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Syarat: Perlu buktikan dengan salinan sijil induksi, anjuran I Smart Educare SAHAJA. Bagi yang ambil dengan penganjur lain dulu, kami juga beri tawaran, diskaun ~30% (RM250)

PP-PPD-PPB
Kepong: 6-7 Jan 18
Ipoh: 27-28 Jan 18PP-PPT
Kepong: 13-14 Ja 18

PPL
Kepong
3-4 Feb 18

Masa: 8.30-5pm
Yuran: RM350 – Maybank 514589203020, I Smart Educare

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Ambil sijil sendiri lepas sijil keluar dalam masa sebulan dua (kekadang mungkin sampai 3 bulan)
Jika nak pos, tambah RM10 untuk postage.

* Diskaun 50% yuran kursus@RM180 jika anda pernah mengikuti kursus ini
* Sesi I Smart Educare biasanya PENUH, jadi daftar awal supaya tidak menyesal terlepas 😂

DAFTAR SEKARANG!
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Lack of information hampers vocational training push

Vocational schools provide youths opportunities to acquire skills, such as hair styling and also small business opportunities. — Bernama picVocational schools provide youths opportunities to acquire skills, such as hair styling and also small business opportunities. — Bernama pic

IPOH, Nov 25 — Lack of information and inadequate career guidance have contributed to the decline of non-academically inclined secondary students taking up vocational courses.

Most said they were unaware of Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) after completing their Form Three.

Kalaiarasan Pandian, 19, from Kampar, said he wasn’t aware of TVET programmes when he chose to stop schooling after Form Three.

“I was not aware of TVET courses and even my teachers did not suggest I take up vocational training.

“They only persuaded me to complete my studies until Form Five,” he told Malay Mail recently.

He also said he did not know where the TVET institutions were, and this hampered the process of applying for courses offered.

Kalaiarasan, now employed as a motorcycle mechanic, said he quit studying as his academic results were not up to mark and his parents could not provide financial support to further his studies.

On Monday, Deputy Education Minister Datuk P. Kamalanathan said only seven per cent of students across the country took up TVET after Form Three.

He also said the ministry took various steps to increase rural students’ enrolment in vocational colleges.

The measures were gaining popularity following broadcasts over radio channels, newspaper advertisements and collaboration with non-governmental organisations.

Teenager, Veenod Nathan,18, from Pusing, Perak, said he did not know about the TVET programme as there wasn’t much promotion on it.

“I’m not aware of  TVET courses and the vocational schools that I know are from my home.

“I quit school two years ago as I wasn’t performing well in studies and at the same time my father met with a bad accident.

“He could not go to work and I have to support my family by working,” he said.

Veenod who is working as a labourer in a warehouse said students who fared poorly in their studies might go for vocational courses if proper guidance were given to them.

Khoo See Nee, 28, who is also a school drop-out, lamented that vocational training such as TVET was not available during her schooling days.

“If I had this option back then, I would definitely have taken up vocational training,” she said.

Khoo said she did not pursue any other vocational education after coming out of school as her guardians could not support her.

Another dropout, who wished to be only known as Derrick, said he felt he had no purpose in life after gaining his SPM last year.

“I did not know what to do and I ended doing various jobs merely to pass time,” the 19-year-old said.

A relative then introduced Derrick to vocational studies.

Currently undergoing training to repair air conditioners and refrigerators in Kuala Lumpur, Derrick took a loan from Kojadi to subsidise the RM20,000 needed for the course.

Meanwhile, MCA Youth vocational education bureau committee member Jimmy Loh blamed parents and students for the lack of interest in vocational training.

“Parents prefer their children to follow the traditional path which can land them a degree but they are not aware that you can also earn a degree from vocational courses,” he said.

Students, he said, were not bothered to seek out information about vocational courses.

Source: http://www.themalaymailonline.com

 

Comments:

Well, not sure whether the students are internet savvy or not, if they are, hope they are able to see this article & here’s the directory of all the JPK Accredited Centres offering TVET programs in Malaysia, private & public.

As for funding, besides Kojadi (refer below), there are other avenues like
1) PTPK (Perbadanan Tabung Pembangunan Kemahiran),
2) SOCSO (children with parents that is)
a) Pencen ilat for contributors that is permanently disabled
b) Pencen penakat for widows
3) Respective state education funds


KOJADI

INTEREST CHARGES

  • Interest will be charged to the applicant’s loan account immediately after the disbursement of the loan.
  • The interest rate for the loan will be as follows :

For existing member of KOJADI with minumum 5 years membership:

1st year (Upon First release of loan) – 5.8% (on a monthly rest and reducing balance basis)

2nd year onwards until full settlement – 6.8% (on a monthly rest and reducing blance basis)

5.8% ~ 6.8% equivalent to 4.5% flat rate

For new member:

1st year (Upon First release of loan) – 6.8% (on a monthly rest and reducing balance basis)

2nd year onwards until full settlement – 7.8% (on a monthly rest and reducing blance basis)

6.8% ~ 7.8% equivalent to 5.8% flat rate

SERVICE OF LOAN INTEREST

Under specified circumstances, loan borrower is required to service loan interest during study period. The monthly interest is between RM100-RM300 depending on the loan amount applied for based the following table :-

Loan Amount Yes No
Below RM25,000 O
RM30,000 O (Course duration > 2 years) O (Course duration < 2 years)
Above RM35,000 O

REPAYMENT OF LOAN

The founding objective of KOJADI is to pool the resources among its members for mutual benefits. Prompt repayment of the loan will enable KOJADI to give similar financial aid to other members for further study.

The repayment of the loan will begin three (3) or six (6) months after graduation and the maximum repayment period shall not exceed 8 years.Depending on the amount of loan and the type of the loan, repayment will be as follows:
  • 1st year – RM200 or RM300 per month
  • 2nd year – RM300 or RM400 per month
  • 3rd year – RM400 or RM500 & above perm onth until full settlement
  • OR equal monthly instalments until full settlement.

FURTHER INFORMATION

The above particulars are subject to change. For further information, please call at out office at

Koperasi Jayadiri Malaysia Berhad (KOJADI)
11th Floor, Wisma MCA,
163 Jalan Ampang,
50450 Kuala Lumpur. Road Map
Tel : 03 – 2161 6499 (Membership and Loan Department)
Fax : 03 – 2162 1413

E-mail :
For Membership related enquiries : member@kojadi.com.my
For Education Loan application related enquiries : loan@kojadi.com.my

 

Ever-expanding roles, responsibilities of MOHR

Riot believes that his ministry has provided a holistic solution to the skilling, upskilling and reskilling of the nation’s workforce.

KUCHING: It comes as no surprise that the Ministry of Human Resources (MOHR) holds many duties under its purview, being the authority in charge of the Malaysian workforce.

The ministry is responsible for skills development, labour, occupational safety and health, trade unions, industrial relations, industrial court, labour market analysis and social security — to name a few — and these responsibilities continue to grow with each new facet introduced, as roles of human resources evolve with time and technology.

Take, for example, the boom of the ‘gig’ economy over the past two years triggering new income-generating trends such as Uber and Airbnb — leading MOHR to come up with new ways to protect the interests of employees in a whole new light.

First formed in 1904 as the Labour Department, it has changed its name six times over the past 114 years, riding on the massive changes in the nation’s industrial landscape and labour forces.

 

Now, MOHR oversees ten federal departments and four federal agencies:

FEDERAL DEPARTMENTS

1. Department of Labour of Peninsular Malaysia (JTKSM)

2. Department of Labour Sarawak

3. Department of Labour Sabah

4. Department of Skills Development (DSD)

5. Manpower Department (JTM)

6. Department of Occupational Safety and Health (Dosh)

7. Department of Industrial Relations Malaysia

8. Department of Trade Union Affairs (JHEKS)

9. Industrial Court of Malaysia

10. Institut of Labour Market Information and Analysis (ILMIA)

FEDERAL AGENCIES

1. Social Security Organisation (SOCSO)

2. Human Resources Development Fund (HRDF)

3. National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)

4. Skills Development Fund Corporation (PTPK)

 

The present minister, Dato Sri (Dr) Richard Riot Jaem — who was sworn in on May 16, 2013 — attributes his success to the holistic approach that he has incorporated in dealing with his ministry’s day-to-day operations and its long-term schemes implemented for the welfare and upskilling of the nation’s labour force.

In an exclusive interview with The Borneo Post, Riot admits that his role as the Minister of Human Resources has been a learning experience in itself.

“To be very frank, when I first came into the ministry, I thought it was only going to deal with labour issues.

Only after coming in did I realise the huge responsibility I had on my shoulders.

It was really going to be a tough job,” he shares.

From looking after the interests and welfare of employees in Peninsular Malaysia, Sarawak and Sabah, to ensuring adequate training and development of the country’s future workforce, the MOHR is involved with anything and everything to do with the affairs of the Malaysian workers.

Following the goals set out under the 11th Malaysia Plan (11MP), Riot aims to build a world-class workforce through steady increases in the percentage of skilled workers up to 35 per cent by 2020.

Today, employers and employees nationwide stand to gain from these numerous programmes and plans being put in place.

Employers can utilise MOHR’s skill development facilities and schemes provided to upskill or reskill their employees, allowing them to enhance their human capital and drive innovation from within.

Meanwhile, SPM holders who have no plans to pursue academically oriented tertiary education are encouraged for technical schools to gain better employment prospects, while high-skilled diasporas are slowly but surely being wooed back home to take on the high-skilled roles that need to be filled urgently.

All of this has contributed greatly to the expansion of the Malaysian economy and society as a whole, helping MOHR bring to life the government’s vision of having a competent and skilled workforce.

Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Tun Razak (second left) visits the exhibition held in connection with the launch of TVET Malaysia at Adtec Shah Alam. On the prime minister’s left is Riot. — Bernama photo

 Skilling, upskilling and reskilling

To achieve this task, Riot says he and his ministry has been focusing on skilling, upskilling and reskilling the labour force through various schemes and programmes that are being made available by the different departments and agencies to the wider public.

Most notably, the skilling of youths is regarded as one of the most vital functions of the MOHR as it ensures the future survivability of industries by providing them with an adequate workforce.

“I always encourage graduates from our Malaysia Skills Certificate (MSC) Level 3 Programmes to re-enrol to MSC Level 4, in order to pursue our diploma courses to continue gaining skills as it will greatly increase their livelihood down the line,” Riot shares.

For SPM School-Leavers with no plans to pursue academically oriented tertiary education, the ministry encourages them — via awareness campaigns — to enrol into one of its 32 technical institutes across the country.

Of the 32, 24 provide various technical and vocational education and training (TVET) certificate courses to the public, with eight having diploma programmes for certificate-holders.

Besides increasing the number of certificate and diploma holders, Riot stresses that the quality of graduates is equally crucial.

“We need to produce a labour force that is equipped with the right knowledge, skills and attitude to thrive in the globalised economy where emerging new technology, digitalisation and ‘Industry 4.0’ have drastically changed what is needed for the average worker.

“Because of this, we have introduced new syllabuses to ensure that our workforce would be able to meet the needs and standards of our changing industries.”

These efforts have been fruitful, discloses Riot, as revealed by the high employability percentage reported for graduates from Miri’s Industrial Training Institute (ILP) and Shah Alam’s Advance Technology Training Centre (Adtec).

“I’m very happy to say the employability rates amongst our graduates are 92 per cent — 92 per cent (of the graduates) showcasing exactly how important TVET skills are to workers nowadays,” he says.

Adding to this, the MOHR has been pushing hard especially for youths to embrace technical courses, as it is anticipated that 60 per cent of our industries would require employees who are technically skilled in the near future.

 Focus on current workforce

With much focus being placed on youths, it appears that many members of the workforce are unable to participate due to prior financial obligations.

To address this, MOHR makes available several programmes to accommodate those currently working — some under the HRDF, and one under the DSD.

The schemes under HRDF are tailored for employees already in the workforce who are looking to upskill or reskill themselves in order to increase their career prospects.

Employers may actively participate in many of HRDF’s programmes by sending their workers for further training.

Besides that, the DSD also provides a programme called the ‘National Dual Training’, which pairs up citizens with paid apprenticeships at selected companies where they may receive offers of employment after graduating from the programme.

This programmes focuses on 30 per cent classroom learning and 70 per cent on-thejob learning, to ensure that the graduates would be able to adapt to their new jobs with ease upon completion of the course.

The skilling of youths is regarded as one of the most vital functions of the MOHR as it ensures the future survivability of industries by providing them with an adequate workforce. — Bernama photo

 Recognising prior experience learning

Riot also recognises that not all workers need further training as they may have already obtained the appropriate experience from long years on the job.

Still, they may lack the formal credentials to justify their skills.

“A lot of people in Malaysia — including Sarawak — are already very skilful with their hands, but they lack the paper accreditation that acts as proof of their skills to employers.

“A worker may be a very good carpenter or welder but because he doesn’t have formal credentials, upon seeking employment he may find that his pay is much lower than what he should be receiving because he is regarded as an unskilled labour,” Riot explains.

Understanding that this would deny a significant part of the local workforce from appropriate wages and bright career paths, Riot discloses that his ministry alongside with the Defence Ministry launched a recognition of prior experiential learning on Feb 22 this year, to help anyone with prior experience or skills from a variety of industries to officially obtain diplomas certifying their abilities.

Each applicant would be assessed in terms of their skills and competency to see if they qualify for the diploma accreditation.

According to Riot, so far more than 1,000 people have registered for the scheme, with 300 due to graduate with diplomas by the end of this year.

“While this scheme is mostly geared towards former Armed Forces personnel, I would like to stress that it is open to those who seek to upgrade themselves for better job prospects and better recognition of their skills and abilities.

“As far as Armed Forces go, they register with Perhebat (Armed Forces Ex-Servicemen Affairs Corporation), but the civilians can either register with the HRDF, or directly with the ministry (MOHR).

” Overall, Riot believes that his ministry has provided a holistic solution to the skilling, upskilling and reskilling of the nation’s workforce.

He adds that while there has been some concern on whether or not Malaysia would be able to meet the goal of 35 per cent skilled workers by 2020, he is confident that the target remains achievable.

“We have about two years to go before reaching 2020 — I am very confident that the 35 per cent target as required by the government can be achieved.

“In order to do so, I would like to especially promote the ministry to Sarawak as I believe there is still a lack of awareness and misconception of what MOHR actually does.

“I believe Sarawakians are still not fully aware of these benefits and opportunities they can obtain from MOHR,” he points out.

Riot looking at the interview registration prosses at the Job Fair organised by the Ministry of Human Resources at UTC Kuching on May 20, 2017.

Source: http://www.theborneopost.com/

Only 7% go for technical, vocational skills after Form Three

KUALA LUMPUR, Nov 20 — Only 7 per cent of students across the country take up Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) after their Form Three.

Deputy Education Minister, Datuk P. Kamalanathan said various efforts had been implemented to increase the entry of students into TVET institutions and vocational colleges, besides giving them exposure on career prospects after graduating from the vocational colleges.

“The Education Ministry has been transforming the TVET since 2012 to uplift the status of this stream as a premier stream to help realise the government’s aspiration of meeting the country’s need for skilled workers by 2020,” he said in reply to a question from Nurul Izzah Anwar (PKR-Lembah Pantai) in the Dewan Rakyat, here, today.

To a supplementary question from Dr Mansor Abd Rahman (BN-Sik) on the ministry’s strategies to increase rural students’ enrolment into the vocational colleges, Kamalanathan said the measures included making publicity broadcasts via the radio channels, newspaper advertisements and collaboration with non-governmental organisations.

He said online applications for entry into the TVET institutions for the 2018 session had been opened and many applications had been received thus far.

Besides the Education Ministry, six other ministries involved in implementing the TVET are the Human Resources; Higher Education; Works; Youth and Sports; Rural and Regional Development; and Agriculture and Agro-based Industry ministries.

Source: Bernama

Preparing Malaysians for the work of the future

The integration of on-the-job training and lifelong learning into TVET curriculum can ensure that graduates are job-ready, yet adaptable to changing skills requirements.

“WHAT do you want to be when you grow up?” This is one question we have all been asked at one point in our lives, whether the answer requires a 350-word essay or just one-word, usually referring to a job.

How does one answer this same question today with automation taking place and the fact that many jobs of the future do not exist yet?

A good example is social media jobs. It is hard to imagine a high-paying social media job a decade ago and this same job may be completely transformed in the near future, if it still exists at all.

Over one-third of skills that are considered important in today’s workforce will probably have changed five years from now based on research by the World Economic Forum (WEF). The young people today will need a portfolio of skills and capabilities to navigate the complex world of work in the future.

In fact, a report by Deloitte University Press on “Re-imagining Higher Education” predicts that 50 per cent of the content in an undergraduate degree will be obsolete within five years due to the impact of digital transformation.

While we talk about the future of work — which jobs will disappear and which will remain — we also need to shift the focus to understand the skills and capabilities in demand.

Another WEF report, The Future of Jobs, identified complex problem solving, critical thinking and creativity as the top three skills out of 10 that workers will need in 2020.

Although active listening is considered a core skill today, the report said that it will completely disappear from being an important skill at the workplace. Instead, emotional intelligence is said to become one of the top skills needed by all in the future.

Linear careers, where the path begins with the choices you made in the subjects you studied at university before entering the world of work, will be far less common. There is a strong need to constructively engage employers in changing the education system in the years to come.

The allocation of RM4.9 billion for TVET (technical and vocational education training) institutions in the 2018 Budget is definitely more necessary now than ever before to prepare for the work of the future.

Malaysia plans to have 35 per cent of skilled workforce by 2020 to achieve a high-income nation status. The government has also set a goal to increase the country’s percentage of skilled workers to 45 per cent by 2030. It is about time the country upgrades its TVET system.

If there is one thing that TVET can do is that it could provide a means of tackling unemployment. Vocational education tends to result in a faster transition into the workplace and countries that place greater emphasis on TVET have been successful in maintaining low youth unemployment rates.

However, a negative social bias has often prevented young people from enrolling in TVET. Although vocational subjects are more varied, they are often poorly understood.

Many people associate vocational track programmes with low academic performance, poor quality provision and blocked future pathways that do not lead to higher education. Young people and parents shun vocational education, which they regard as a “second-choice” education option.

Academic subjects are valued more highly than vocational ones. Medicine, law and engineering are seen as career options with huge earnings potential. Several academic studies also caution against specialising vocational subjects at a young age because they are more specific and directly related to particular occupations.

For TVET to be valued as the equal of academic education, further education providers should not be overlooked.

The integration of on-the-job training and lifelong learning into TVET curriculum can ensure that graduates are job-ready yet adaptable to changing skills requirements. The funding is necessary so that TVET institutions can upgrade learning environments and invest in professional development. In return, it can raise teaching quality by increasing the qualification levels of the instructors and making pedagogical training obligatory.

Finland is one example of TVET success — a result of external and internal policy shifts — that we can learn from. The country’s systematic efforts since 2000 to upgrade the quality and status of TVET has lead to an increased percentage of application for the programmes from the Finnish youth.

TVET institutions in this country received the same basic and development funding as general education institutions. The curriculum has been restructured to include the national core curriculum required for access to university, as well as strong on-the-job training and lifelong learning components. TVET students are allowed to progress to further studies at university or applied sciences level.

Many parents’ worst nightmare is seeing their child aimlessly chasing dream without achieving anything. It is time that we should retire asking the young ones on what they want to be when they grow up.

Instead, we should provide accurate information and exposure to where future jobs will exist, including the skills to craft and navigate their careers.

It looks like learning and adapting will become more apparent in the future of workforce. As more students will find themselves doing work that does not exist, we should prepare them intellectually, socially and emotionally to continuously adapt to changes.

Source: www.nst.com.my

 

International School for Sale

International School 1 (Negeri Sembilan)

Asking price : RM 160million with land and building.

On paper profitable

2) International School 2 ( group of 8 schools )

Located in various parts of Peninsular Malaysia and in large cities

As group profitable

Asking Price RM 250 million ( some with buiding and some without / only licence.

The option to seek buyers are with my associates. You will need to furnish and sign an  NDA from the buyers party to seek further information, view the site and to start negotiation.

TVET getting more popular, says Human Resources Minister

Human Resources Minister Datuk Richard Riot Jaem (centre) presenting a scroll to one of the graduates at the National Dual Training System’s 3rd Convocation Ceremony at Panggung Budaya of the Sarawak Cultural Village. Pix by Goh Pei Pei

Human Resources Minister Datuk Richard Riot Jaem said TVET used to be a second option for those who did not excel academically.

“However, in the past four to five years, we noticed that students who did well academically also enrolled in TVET institutions.

“This show that there the government’s efforts, in raising awareness on the importance and potential of TVET, have worked out positively,” he said.

“Malaysia plans to have 35 per cent of skilled workforce by 2020 in order to achieve a high income nation status.

“I am confident that we can reach our target because our skilled workforce has increased from 28 per cent (in 2015) to 31 per cent this year,” he said.

Many developed countries, Richard said, also emphasised on TVET.

For instances, more then 50 per cent of the workforce in Singapore are skilled workers, he pointed out.

Speaking at the National Dual Training System’s 3rd Convocation Ceremony here, he said academic success is still relevant but there is also a need to have a workforce that is equipped with skills and technical knowledge.

He said an allocation of RM4.9 billion for TVET institutions in the 2018 Budget showed the government’s commitment towards the vision.

“I can assure you that if you are a graduate of TVET, you will have a bright future as the country needs you,” he added.

A total 173 students received their scroll at the ceremony today, having attended various courses including food preparation and presentation, homestay operation, traditional music and dancing performances and audio production.

Source: By Goh Pei Pei – 

Education Ministry: No racial quota for entry to vocational colleges

Deputy Education Minister Datuk Chong Sin Woon said the government was building more vocational colleges to provide more places for students interested in taking up technical and vocational courses. — Saw Siong FengDeputy Education Minister Datuk Chong Sin Woon said the government was building more vocational colleges to provide more places for students interested in taking up technical and vocational courses. — Saw Siong Feng

KUALA LUMPUR, Nov 1 — The Education Ministry said today it had not set any racial quota for intake of students into vocational colleges.

Deputy Education Minister Datuk Chong Sin Woon said the government was building more vocational colleges to provide more places for students interested in taking up technical and vocational courses.

He said that since the Vocational Education Transformation Plan was introduced in 2012, some 81 vocational colleges went into operation throughout the country and five more were under construction.

“The provision of new places for vocational training does not depend on racial quota as it is open to all students who want to acquire the skills,” he said during Question Time in the Dewan Rakyat.

He was replying to a supplementary question from M. Kulasegaran (DAP-Ipoh Barat) who wanted to know the efforts of the government in assisting minority groups such as the Indian community to obtain places in vocational colleges.

When replying to the original question from Kulasegaran on the number of students who succeeded in obtaining the Sijil Kemahiran Malaysia (Malaysia Skills Certificate), Chong said that to date, 2,273 graduates in the 2016 first cohort from 15 vocational colleges received the Vocational College Diplomas.

He said 12,997 graduates in the second cohort obtained similar diplomas in August this year.

“A total of 90.58 per cent of the 2,273 first cohort graduates had gained employment while 55.49 per cent of the 12,997 students in the second cohort were offered jobs even before completing their studies,” he said. — Bernama

Comment: It’s the awareness & perhaps language & culture barrier that limits the number of non Malay students in these vocational colleges (basically any public institutions). Therefore, it’s very important that non Malay students have a better command of the Malay language and this must start from primary schools, otherwise they would shun these public institutions.

2018 Budget: TVET Malaysia Master Plan unveiled, RM4.9bil allocated

All Technical and Vocational Education Training institutions previously under seven ministries will be rebranded as TVET Malaysia and placed under the Human Resources Ministry.

KUALA LUMPUR: All Technical and Vocational Education Training institutions previously under seven ministries will be rebranded as TVET Malaysia and placed under the Human Resources Ministry.

Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Razak said today that RM4.9 billion will also be allocated to implement the TVET Malaysia Master Plan.

“To encourage TVET graduates to continue their studies, the government has prepared 100 TVET Excellent Students Scholarships worth RM4.5 million,” he added.

The government will also create the National Rail Centre of Excellence in a bid to support skilled workers in the rail industry.

The centre, he said, will supervise and coordinate quality assurance, as well as national rail education and training accreditation.

Najib also said Malaysia Rail Link Sdn Bhd, in cooperation with higher education institutions, will train 3,000 professionals in the industry.

Source: NST Online

Comment: It’s good that finally efforts can be streamlined. Hopefully the Ministry of Human Resources, especially the Department of Skills Development, has the extra capacity in terms of manpower & budget to execute policies well.

National Dual Training System (NDTS) / Sistem Latihan Dual Nasional (SLDN)

NDTS is an industry-oriented training program that combines workplace and institutional training.

School leavers or existing workers who meet the criteria can be offered as apprentices by a sponsoring company to undergo training.

A contract is signed between the company and the apprentices prior to the training. Apprentices are given certain amount of allowance throughout the training by the company and are obliged to work with the company upon completion if they are offered employment.

The hands-on training is conducted continuously and the apprentice is expected to get through the assessment as well as the final test which will be conducted at the end of the training programme. Successful apprentices will be awarded with the national skills qualification by Department of Skills Development (DSD).

SUMMARY

Participating in NDTS is an appropriate decision for every enterprise to make, in order to ensure that apprentices are trained to become k-workers for the development of human capital to steer Malaysia to become a developed nation by the year 2020.

With NDTS in place, Malaysia’s growth is well on its way towards an industry driven skilled workforce development approach. The opportunity to be a part of NDTS not only enhances corporate performance, but also represents a commitment to investment in human resources.

All companies and business enterprises are welcomed to participate and implement the NDTS. The system is established for company interest and benefit.

Department of Skills Development as the coordinating body will provide assistance and guidance to ensure that company can participate in the system.

For more info, please visit official DSD Website: www.dsd.gov.my

 

Time Frame The duration is based on the scope and level of certification
Practical-theory ratio 70 – 80 % Practical training in real work situations
30 – 20 % Related theory classes at training centers
Delivery Method Day Release System
-For example for a four-day practical training in companies, followed by one day class theory at training center.
Block Release System ( if necessary)
-For example 3-4 months, followed by practical training1-4 weeks of class-related theories.
Trainer SPM and / or employees working and selected by the company. The Company is not obligated to offer employment after completion of training
Training Allowance
(If training is carried out in 2 years )
Semester 1 – RM 350.00 Monthly
Semester 2 – RM 400.00 Monthly
Semester 3 – RM 450.00 Monthly
Semester 4 – RM 500.00 Monthly
Awarding Qualifications Certificate K-workers, equivalent to SKM Level 3 qualification or DKM (Level 4) or DLKM (Level 5) approved by the DSD and related employer organizations.

The NDTS with its industry oriented training concept is deemed superior to institutional-based training because:

i.        Minimize mismatch (quality and quantity) between the companies’ requirement and skilled workforce development through demand-driven orientation.

ii.        Training is based on work process approach under actual work conditions

iii.        The need for continuous technological advancement.

iv.        Minimize dependence on foreign workers.

v.        Increase the speed of  transferring technology by providing training in actual working environment

vi.        Inculcates positive training culture in companies, especially in SMEs.

Source: www.dsd.gov.my