TEMPOH MASA PERMOHONAN PENGELUARAN SIJIL SKM/DKM/DLKM/PC DI BAWAH PUSAT BERTAULIAH (PB)

Ruj     : JPK/700/51 Jld 13 (  31   )

Tarikh : 3 Oktober 2017

Salam Sejahtera dan Salam Negaraku,

Adalah dimaklumkan Jabatan Pembangunan Kemahiran (JPK) sedang dalam proses penambahbaikan pengurusan Sijil SKM/DKM/DLKM/PC di bawah kendalian Jabatan ini.

Sehubungan dengan itu, PB adalah dinasihatkan supaya membuat semakan status permohonan lengkap  pengeluaran Sijil SKM/DKM/DLKM/PC kepada JPK selepas tiga (3) bulan daripada permohonan Sijil dikemukakan kepada JPK sekiranya masih belum menerima Sijil tersebut. Sekiranya PB gagal untuk membuat semakan status Sijil tersebut selepas enam (6) bulan dari tarikh permohonan lengkap, PB dikehendaki mengemukakan bukti-bukti permohonan pengeluaran Sijil terdahulu sebagai bukti pengesahan kepada JPK.

Selain itu, bagi PB yang telah menerima Sijil SKM/DKM/DLKM/PC tetapi terdapat kesilapan pada Sijil  tersebut, PB hendaklah mengemukakan permohonan pembetulan Sijil tersebut dalam tempoh dua(2) bulan selepas tarikh cetakan Sijil tersebut.

Peraturan baharu ini berkuatkuasa bagi permohonan pengeluaran Sijil SKM/DKM/DLKM/PC yang diterima bermula 1 November 2017.

Sekian terima kasih.

“BERKHIDMAT UNTUK NEGARA”

“Pekerja Kreatif Pencetus Inovasi”

Ketua Pengarah

Jabatan Pembangunan Kemahiran

Kementerian Sumber Manusia

How Do We Equip Malaysia’s Workforce For Industry 4.0

The focus of Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) recently received widespread attention in Malaysia, after Datuk Seri Najib Razak announced the government’s plan to develop a comprehensive TVET plan to help the future workforce in facing the Fourth Industrial Revolution.

Coined by German economist Klaus Schwab in 2015, the Fourth Industrial Revolution is used to describe the emergence of the Digital Economy and use of automation and data exchange in industrial technologies. Commonly referred to with the catchprase Industry 4.0 it also included the Internet of Things and collaboration between networked machines and human beings in decision-making.

We might not feel it in our daily lives but robots and computers are slowly replacing some traditional jobs from the last century and creeping into our daily lives in the form of smart appliances and machines with computer programmes that can learn our habits and preferences.

Technology experts are already speaking about the coming industrial revolution as one that has the potential to disrupt every industry in every country due to the exponential pace that is the nature of digital revolution which is at the heart of Industry 4.0

This is already happening in businesses and industries as robotics and artificial intelligence can take over jobs traditionally manned by human labour, in particular technical processes that can easily be computerised.

As for the Malaysian government, they are going to allocate RM 50 million from 30 % of the Human Resources Development Fund (HRDF) funds collected for the purpose of TVET, to increase competitiveness as well as improving the calibre of the workforce and the nation’s economic development.

While our nation is still in the process of streamlining vocational education to meet international standards, it also has to grapple with revamping the same fledgling TVET education structure to ensure the skills taught are not at risk of becoming obsolete.

What skills and education do TVET students need in order to ride the coming digital revolution and not risk having their expertise be replaced by a computerised machine?

To understand the importance of TVET in facing Industry 4.0, Malaysian Digest reached out to industry insiders for an insight on the matter.

Malaysia Is Lagging Behind Its Southeast Asian Neighbours In Implementing Vocational Education

Malaysian Digest interviewed Adlan Ali, an electrical engineering and TVET lecturer in Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Melaka (UTeM). He has written many papers relating to TVET education, and have collaborated with many academic institutions, private companies and government agencies relating to TVET for the past 18 years.

Adlan Ali. Photo: UTeMAdlan Ali. Photo: UTeM“According to a report by the United Nations International Centre For Technical and Vocational Education and Training (UNEVOC), our country is still under the “awaiting validation” status. Meanwhile our neighbouring Southeast Asian countries such as Thailand, Phillipines, Indonesia, Myanmar and Cambodia have already been on the database way ahead of us,” said Adlan.

One of the reasons why our country is lacking in structured TVET education is because currently seven ministries and almost all state governments are running it.

Adlan strongly feels that this stands in the way of proper establishment for TVET governance, which is one the requirements to be fulfilled before Malaysia can be listed on the World TVET Database.

Fortunately, the government has realised the importance of TVET education, and has included its agenda as the third core in the 11th Malaysia Plan to elevate human resources development and making TVET transformation an identified focus field.

TVET lecturers around the country also collaborated to create a structure for the TVET education.

“Starting from a small fund of research grant and a small group of individuals, we have managed to collaborate together and developed the National Occupational Skills Standard (NOSS) for TVET Lecturers, Trainers and Educators. The NOSS has been recently approved and the name of the NOSS is TVET Implementation and Development,” he said, and members of the organisation include lecturers from UTeM, UniKL, UniMAP, Malaysia Science Academy and many other agencies.

As for adapting to Industry 4.0, TVET providers have seriously reviewed their existing programme’s objectives and learning outcomes to ensure FIR is well-stated and learned.

In the case of UTeM, they have recently reviewed its academic programmes at the university level, as well as offering new academic programmes that are tailored and suited towards the FIR.

Malaysia is yet to achieve a validated status by UNEVOC.Malaysia is yet to achieve a validated status by UNEVOC.

In order for the government to decide which industries must be focused in the current TVET education, all ministries and state governments must work with the Ministry Of Human Resource, under the Industry Skills Committee (Jawatankuasa Kemahiran Industri – JKI) and Skills Development Department (Jabatan Pembangunan Kemahiran – JPK).

“That way, we can detect what industries are potentially booming in the country and internationally, what industries are currently lacking competent workers what level of position the industries are lacking such as managers, engineers and technicians,” opined Adlan.

Most TVET graduates will be working in small-and-medium enterprises (SMEs). However, according to the Malaysian Productivity Corporation (MPC), ICT adoption by SMEs in Malaysia is a mere 10%. This is in stark contrast to other developed countries where the adoption stands at 50%. To meet the technological demands of Industry 4.0, ICT education must be taught to TVET students as well.

“Malaysian Industrial Development Authority (MIDA) has got to be given more roles and obligations, to ensure FIR is well within reach of the SMEs and very objective to be achieved.

“The partnership / collaboration between industries – TVET institutions must be made top priority because as far as I’m concerned, the existing scenarios are not that encouraging as the industries are focusing on meeting their production target, while the TVET institutions are focusing on their ‘on-paper only’ planning,” he explained.

The key to implementing TVET education in Malaysia, according to Adlan, is awareness. Industries must support the government’s plans and aspirations, helping the workers grow, and making the country’s TVET on par with the developed countries.

“At national level, we may talk about TVET and FIR but at the production and manufacturing ground level, I believe the awareness are still below par. With the existing global economic scenarios and Malaysian currency exchange, industries tends to commit on productions cum profits rather than focusing on TVET and Industry 4.0,” he shared with Malaysian Digest.

As Adlan highlighted, looking at the big picture is one thing but what about the actual situation on the ground? Malaysian Digest looks at the measures taken by local vocational training organizations to ensure their students can be at the forefront of the coming fourth industrial revolution.

GiatMara’s Role In Enhancing Skills, Knowledge Of The Nation’s Youth

GIATMARA is a government institution providing technical and vocational skills training to youths in rural and urban areas. Their aim is to ensure the students are equipped with the valuable skills to become technical entrepreneurs and workforce in fulfilling the country’s industrial needs.

In understanding how GIATMARA is helping the youths to adapt to today’s challenges created by FIR, Malaysian Digest contacted Dato’ Arman Azha, the deputy chairman of GIATMARA.

Dato' Arman Azha.Dato’ Arman Azha.“GIATMARA focuses on hands-on education, rather than theory-based reading. We have 231 GIATMARA centers all over the country,” he briefed Malaysian Digest.

Before the implementation of TVET education by Datuk Seri Najib Razak two years ago, GIATMARA created 22,000 graduates annually. Out of the 22,000 graduates, only 10% will be entrepreneurs, while the rest will be working in factories and workshops.

“However, since about one year ago, we decided to teach entrepreneurship skills to our students as well. From there, we created a course called Mobilepreneur Muda (Young Mobilepreneurs) in collaboration with Minister of Rural and Regional Development,” explained Dato’ Armand, in which the aim of the programme is at least 50% of their graduates will become SME entrepreneurs.

On top of the normal vocational lessons, the qualified students under this program will receive some assistance in the form of free motorbikes to help them move around, as well as equipment related to their vocational training. More importantly, they are taught to utilise technology to promote themselves in the digital market and adapt to the challenges of FIR.

In the past, GIATMARA provided small financial assistance to its graduates in helping them adapt to the industry. However, many of them mismanaged the money, so the organisation decided to help with other form of assistance.

“Instead of providing financial assistance, this programme is much more efficient and cheaper as well. In six months, the students under the programme must show their progress after we helped them.

“If they are doing well, then the equipment and motorbike will be given to them for free. On the other hand, if they failed to utilise our assistance well, we have the right to take the motorbike back,” he explained.

Mobilepreneur Muda intends to help vocational graduates in kickstarting their business.Mobilepreneur Muda intends to help vocational graduates in kickstarting their business.

This year alone, the programme has helped 3,000 young TVET enterpreneurs. Other than creating new programmes, GIATMARA also revises their curriculum and creates new courses to adapt to today’s demands that are shaped by the FIR.

New courses include aircraft maintenance, heavy machine maintenance and many others that are in high demand.

GIATMARA also realises the crucial role of technology in creating successful SMEs, and students are encouraged to make full use of the technology such as social media and smartphone applications to promote their businesses.

“In facing the FIR, we are providing digital courses as well, such as online marketing and graphic design.

“GIATMARA also revises our courses from time to time to ensure our courses remain relevant with today’s technological demands,” he concluded.

Introducing TVET Education To Tahfiz Students To Prepare For Industry 4.0

Maahad Tahfiz Vokasional Aman Bistari in Puchong.Maahad Tahfiz Vokasional Aman Bistari in Puchong.

One of the main points in Datuk Seri Najib Razak’s recently launched TVET initiative is to introduce TVET educational to tahfiz students as value add for them, whereby besides memorising the Quran, they would also have valuable trade skills.

The initiative is highly lauded by Mohd Asri Yunus, founder and principal of Maahad Tahfiz Vokasional Aman Bistari, a group of tahfiz schools in Malaysia that teaches not only Islamic knowledge, but vocational training as well.

Mohd Asri Yunus.Mohd Asri Yunus.“The first school was founded back in 2009. At first, we only taught culinary skills to our students. Over the years, we have expanded to nine vocational courses on top of culinary, such as sewing, calligraphy, animation, automotive repair, and farming,” explained Mohd Asri to Malaysian Digest.

While the students are learning the vocational skills, Islamic knowledge is at the core of the school’s basic education.

Maahad Tahfiz Vokasional Aman Bistari is the first vocational tahfiz center in the country, and since their inception have grown to six campuses all over Malaysia.

Students in the culinary hall.Students in the culinary hall.

A vocational institution graduate himself and former oil-and-gas employee, Mohd Asri was requested by the late Kelantan chief minister Tuan Guru Nik Aziz to transform traditional tahfiz center systems into a more modern system, one that teaches skills outside of religious knowledge as well.

“The syllabus that is taught in our centers is on par with the ones being taught at normal vocational institutions. Our equipment is industrial-grade, and we have spent more than RM60,000 to equip our schools.

“Even for our teachers, our tahfiz center hires industry veterans with certified qualifications and years of experience. For example, our culinary teachers are consultants to Federal Agricultural Marketing Authority (FAMA) and many universities,” he said. In the future, the tahfiz center aims to create hospitality and mold-and-die manufacturing courses.

The center takes in students up to 17 years old, and prides itself of being a tahfiz center that teaches worldly skills on top of religious knowledge.

According to Mohd Asri, students in his center are less likely to lose interest in memorising the Quran as they are also taught interesting courses in between Quranic lessons.

The skills taught to the students are designed so that once they graduate, they can immediately work in their respective fields. The culinary students of the tahfiz center run their own conventional catering service for weddings and special functions, and the sewing students also take up orders from customers outside the tahfiz center so that the students can develop their skills to be marketable.

The students providing catering service to a special function.The students providing catering service to a special function.

“We emphasise hands-on approach. They prepare all the foods that the students eat, and the students sewed their own clothes as well. Once the students have been with us for more than a year, they will be sent to the industry for on-the-job training.”

The center is registered under the Selangor Islamic Department (JAIS) and receives funding from the parents, corporate sponsorships and state government. Even though their education is separate from the national school system, the students can take their SPM examinations when they are 18 years old.

Mohd Asri encourages other tahfiz centers to develop vocational education as well, however he admits that creating such education is not easy.

“For one, hiring the right teachers is difficult. Many qualified individuals refuse to work with tahfiz centers, and sometimes, the tahfiz centers have issues with hiring teachers that are not of religious background.

“For me, I do not care whether the teachers are religious or not. We only employ them for their expertise, and sometimes the teachers can learn religious matters from the students as well,” he relayed to Malaysian Digest.

Other challenges include high cost of starting vocational education, but Mohd Asri has seen tahfiz centers taking their own initiatives to help their students learn much-needed vocational skills. Some centers have collaborated with their local vocational centers and community colleges to teach the tahfiz students.

Many of Aman Bistari’s graduates have found jobs or even started their own businesses thanks to the skills learned while they were in the center. Mohd Asri hopes that his center can be an example for other tahfiz centers to follow to add value to their students, and embrace the call to TVET education by Datuk Seri Najib Razak.

— Malaysian Digest

Thai & Malaysia students to gain from Taiwan’s policy

More scholarships offered to academic staff and students from the region.

TAIWAN’S NEW “Southbound” policy will mean more educational opportunities for people from all Asean countries, including Thailand.

“In line with the policy, our government will offer more scholarships for academic staff and students from Southeast Asian nations to boost the development of the region’s human resource,” said Taiwanese Education Minister Pan Wen-chung.

Fifteen scholarships are being granted via the Thai Ministry of Education, which is also covering Bt20,000 personal expenses per month for Masters Degree students and Bt15,000 for undergraduate students besides a Bt40,000 contribution towards the tuition fees.

“We want to help Thai lecturers, most of whom have Masters Degrees to study for their PhD in Taiwan via this scholarship scheme,” said Pan. “We are also creating a platform for Thai and Taiwanese universities to work together and we are also organising human resources training.”

Taiwan would expand its foreign student quota, particularly for those from Asean countries, in the academic year 2018, he added.

In 2016, Taiwan granted 193 scholarships for undergraduates from Asean countries. while also giving a further 984 language learning scholarships and 100 scholarships for lecturers from these countries.

In that same period, Taiwan had 12,000 students from Malaysia, 5,000 students from Indonesia, 4,700 students from Vietnam and 1,700 students from Thailand. The ministry expected the number of Asean students to rise in future.

Besides scholarships, Taiwan also offered human resources training for Asean countries on various subjects, including academic, industry, vocational promotion or executives’ business administration, Pan said. “What Taiwan wants is to pass on its experience and knowledge to Asean countries,” Pan said, adding that Taiwan was looking at hiking Taiwan-Asean investments in education to a value of Bt1 billion.

President Tsai Ing-wen administration’s “new southbound policy”, which came from a proposal by the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP), was clear that a priority should be to strengthen ties with Southeast Asian nations and India, as well as Australia and New Zealand.

As some critics feared this policy might not last long if Taiwan’s opposition Nationalist Party, also known as Kuomintang, won power, Pan affirmed the policy would remain as it concerned education. This policy was also useful to Taiwan, he said citing the increase in the number of visitors from Southeast Asia to Taiwan, which is safe and friendly to visitors.

Taiwan’s capital Taipei is home to 100,000 foreign partners and children of Taiwanese nationals. The biggest immigrant group is Vietnamese, followed by Indonesian, Myanmar and Thai.

To help educate them in their original languages the ministry would add Asean language courses in primary schools, Pan said.

Starting in 2019, every primary school in Taiwan will include seven Asean languages as elective subjects: Thai, Vietnamese, Malaysian, Burman, Indonesian, Cambodian and Filipino.

Besides the private businesses in Taiwan those in the wooden furniture industry also want to invite Asean people for training in furniture design and related technology.

“Many Taiwanese have invested in Southeast Asia. We have capital and technology but we don’t have the raw materials. So we are ready and willing to train new people if the government can promote this as an educational scheme under the new southbound policy,” said Mauson Industrial Co’s general manager Hsu Michael.

Jason Huang, director of the Taiwan Woodworking Machinery Association in Taichung City, said businesspeople were ready to train Asean people as many had already invested in the region.

The association has supported an industrial-academic cooperation training programme in furniture and carpentry at National Taipei University of Technology and next year, 40 Vietnamese students will undergo one-year vocational training course there.

At National Formosa University, a well-known technical institute in Huwei District, Yunlin County, study programmes in engineering and technology are popular among students from Southeast Asia.

Most of the foreign students were Chinese Malaysians who were studying undergraduate programmes as the university .

One lecturer, Assistant Professor Arnold Wang, said 18 Malaysian students were studying a programme comprising eight months of teaching classes and four months of internship.

Two of these students would be awarded full tuition coverage based on highest grade averages.

The university also wants to introduce courses at Malaysian institutes with a high population of Chinese Malaysian students, such as Taylor’s University Subang Jaya in the Malaysian State of Selangor.

A Malaysian student identified only as Daniel said he chose to study at Formosa due to its prestigious mechanical engineering courses and the opportunity of internship at a real workplace. He said being taught in the Chinese language posed no difficulty to him and although it was more expensive than studying in Malaysia, Daniel said it was worth it.

Another student, Chan Kwan Chen from the Malaysian State of Kedah, agreed, saying that studying in Taiwan offered new opportunities and experiences compared with studying in his home country.

Having some relatives in Thailand, the young man said he knew too little about Thai institutes and hoped to learn more.

Source: http://www.nationmultimedia.com

Polytechnics can help reduce dependence on foreign labour

Polytechnics can help reduce dependence on foreign labour - DPM Zahid

DPM AHMAD ZAHID: We are confident that the government education system also focuses on TVET, which is better than any qualification that is not too technical. -Bernama

BESUT: Establishing polytechnics that offer technical and vocational education and training (TVET) can reduce the country’s dependence on skilled and semi-skilled immigrant workers, Deputy Prime Minister Datuk Seri Ahmad Zahid Hamidi said today.

Then, immigrant workers would only be required for the 3D (dirty, difficult and dangerous) occupations, he said.

“With the establishment of polytechnics, the Higher Education Ministry targeted a total of 100,000 students nationwide. I strongly support the policy and operating system implemented by Minister Datuk Seri Idris Jusoh.

“When polytechnics focus on TVET, it means emphasis on training of skilled and semi-skilled workers. We know that jobs in our country in these skills depend on immigrant workers,” he said at the ground-breaking for the Besut Polytechnic building in Bukit Keluang here.

Also present were Terengganu Menteri Besar Datuk Seri Ahmad Razif Abd Rahman and Idris.

The polytechnic is the 34th established so far.

“We are confident that the government education system also focuses on TVET, which is better than any qualification that is not too technical,” said Ahmad Zahid.

He quoted statistics indicating that 85 per cent of polytechnic students secure employment within six months after graduation while 50 per cent of eligible students who pass the Sijil Pelajaran Malaysia (SPM) examination opt for polytechnics as their first choice in TVET.

Meanwhile, some 500 graduates were produced annually in the creative and information technology industries, he said, adding that he hoped that Idris would be able to work on producing 5,000 such graduates in the future.

“Education is an important asset of the country. It is also a long-term investment because we want to build social mobility.

“We want to improve the socio-economic status of the people,” he said.

The Besut Polytechnic was officially established on March 22 in line with the government recommendation under the 11th Malaysia Plan that promoted opportunities for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

The Besut Polytechnic offers, among others, the Diploma in Digital Technology (Information Technology) and provides opportunities for students to contribute their skills in various sectors including agriculture, fisheries and manufacturing technology.

Besides the Besut Polytechnic, another polytechnic is to be built in Bagan Datuk, Perak, once the matter of land acquisition has been settled.

Source: BERNAMA

PM outlines several initiatives for TVET transformation

Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Abdul Razak officiating the launch of TVET Malaysia at the Advanced Technology Training Centre (ADTEC) in Shah Alam on Sept 27, 2017. — Sunpix by Zulfadhli Zaki

SHAH ALAM: Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Abdul Razak today outlined several initiatives to transform Technical and Vocational Education and Training in the country, which includes developing a TVET Masterplan.

He said the masterplan will be streamlined by the Ministry of Human Resources with other ministries involved in TVET like the Higher Education Ministry and Education Ministry.

Secondly, the prime minister said the government would allocate RM50 million from 30% of Pembangunan Sumber Manusia Bhd’s (PSMB) accumulated funds, for TVET.

“For the information of all, PSMB has set aside 30% of levies collected by the Human Resource Development Fund as a pool fund to implement strategic programmes as an effort to support achieving of national objectives in raising the level of skilled workers in Malaysia,” he said when launching TVET Malaysia at the Advanced Technology Training Centre (ADTEC) here today.

Also present were Human Resource Minister Datuk Seri Richard Riot Jaem, Higher Education Minister Datuk Seri Idris Jusoh and Education Minister Datuk Seri Mahdzir Khalid.

Najib said that to transform TVET, special attention must also be given to Industrial Revolution 4.0 so as to create a workforce that is able to compete on the world stage.

He said that to support this revolution, collaboration was being forged with Skills Development Centres, polytechnics, universities and companies, entailing an allocation of RM75 million.

“Besides this, the government will also review the rate and charges related to filing of intellectual property as well as incentives that are suitable to encourage more innovation especially through the TVET institution,” he said.

The prime minister said human capital that was highly skilled was very important in transforming the national economy and function to narrow the the skills gap the country was facing, particularly by industry.

As such, he said that with Malaysia heading to become a high income nation, the government was committed to five core thrusts in transforming TVET including training 300,000 Malaysians from the lower income or B40 group from now until 2025.

The B40 group, Najib said, involved rural residents, urban poor, Orang Asli, school leavers and dropouts, single mothers and unemployed people.

“The government also plans to introduce TVET to tahfiz students as value add for them, whereby besides memorising the Quran they would also have skills in TVET.

“At the same time, from now till 2025, the government will make efforts to train and raise the number of teaching staff in TVET, whereby we are targeting 20,000 more Vocational Training Officers, thus contributing to training a higher number of people to have TVET qualifications.

“Besides that, the number of specialist trainers in TVET will also be increased by 4,000 people in various TVET fields by 2025,” he said.

As for the second thrust, Najib said the government was committed to strengthen and intensify strategic Public-Private Partnership cooperation or between TVET and industry to create synergy in developing quality human capital.

The strategic cooperation, he explained, could be realised in various forms like industry contributing expertise or machinery and equipment for training in certain fields where the industrial market badly needs such human capital.

“Thirdly, for TVET graduates, career opportunities are not only limited in the industry, TVET graduates can also venture into business, especially technopreneurship or become technopreneurs in technical fields.

“Fourthly, in the 2017 Budget, the government has allocated RM20 million for the purpose of matching grants, where the financial provision is given at the same value of contributions received from industry for high impact TVET programmes. Surely, this grant can be utilised in joint ventures between public agencies and the private sector to train and produce more skilled manpower.

“Fifth is to brand the TVET institutions in this country as TVET Malaysia, where all TVET institutions under various ministries are united as a great collaboration to train Malaysians, especially young people to become a highly skilled technical workforce,” he said.

The prime minister said TVET Malaysia should be used as an ongoing campaign to attract Malaysians to choose TVET as the main choice in their career path.

Indirectly, Najib said it would be able to change and correct the negative perceptions of the people who often thought that TVET was the second or last choice and was only ventured into by those who did not have good academic qualifications.

In conjunction with the launch of TVET Malaysia, the prime minister also attended a TN50 dialogue session with students from TVET institutions nationwide, which aimed at gaining their aspirations in the field of human capital development in the future.

The event also recognised seven TVET icons who are successful in their career and business.

Source: BERNAMA

PM moots vocational training for tahfiz students

Najib today launched an initiative to rebrand all vocational training centres to spur a collaborative movement across several government ministries headed by the Human Resource Ministry. ― Bernama picSHAH ALAM, Sept 27 — Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Razak today mooted providing technical and vocational training for students of Islamic religious schools, or tahfiz schools in Malaysia.

Najib said that providing such trainings for tahfiz students would allow them to gain valuable technical experience while becoming well versed in the Quran.

“I suggest introducing Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) to tahfiz students as an addition to their abilities. They would be well versed in Al-Quran and also have skills,” he said during the launch of a rebranding campaign for all vocational training centres in Malaysia.

Najib today launched an initiative to rebrand all vocational training centres under the same umbrella called TVET Malaysia, to spur a collaborative movement across several government ministries headed by the Human Resource Ministry.

Najib said that Malaysia must strive to produce a generation with skills to undertake new jobs, which are likely to be created in the future with the advent of technology.

“Back in the 1960s, we had only four TVETs, but now there are over 1,000 TVETs across Malaysia,” Najib pointed out.

The transformation and rebranding of TVETs are part of the National Blue Ocean Strategy (NBOS).

The aim, Najib said, is to enable TVETs to help 300,000 students from the B40 category by 2025.

Source: http://www.themalaymailonline.com/malaysia/article/pm-moots-vocational-training-for-tahfiz-students

Closing of IPGs no cause for worry

Datuk Joseph Salang

SIBU: There is no need for the people to worry about the decision to close down the Teachers Training Institute (IPG) Rajang Campus.

According to Julau MP Datuk Joseph Salang, the government would convert the institute into a technical and vocational education and training (TVET) centre for the state.

“The trend is now more for the world to shift from academic to vocational and technical education.

“Many graduates are now getting less marketable than those with technical education and training,” he said at ‘Projek Simfoni Kasih 4.0’ held by Betong Vocational College at Rumah Selikau, Nanga Selaut Tengah in Julau recently.

“There is this fear that Sarawak would not be able to produce 90 per cent local teachers when the college is closed down in 2020.

“But our universities are also producing trained teachers as well,” said Salang, stressing that the country would also need more technically-qualified youths apart from administrators. If we want to be a progressive nation, we need to follow suit,” he said.

On the government’s intention to set up more TVET institutions, Salang said this is a very good thing for the youth.

“I am sure they will not only be learning to use Bahasa Malaysia, but will also be making use of English as the medium of instruction for some of the subjects that they may take,” he said.

Earlier in his speech, Betong Vocational College director Lim Ah Juan said the objective of the two-day programme was to instil and develop good social values and communication skill in its students.

Source: http://www.theborneopost.com/2017/09/25/closing-of-ipgs-no-cause-for-worry/

Kursus Induksi PP-PPD-PPB, PP-PPT & PPL bulan Oktober/November

Induksi PP-PPD-PPB

1) Tarikh: 30/9-1/10 2017
Tempat: HTC International Academy, Metro Pudu (tinggal 1 tempat sahaja – Kemaskini 21/9)
2) Tarikh: 14-15 Okt 2017
Tempat: Setiawalk, Puchong
3) Tarikh: 18-19 Nov 2017
Tempat: Kepong Metro Prima

Masa: 8.30-5pm
Yuran: RM350 + 10 (caj pengeposan sijil)

Induksi PP-PPT
Tarikh: 7-8 Okt 2017
Tempat: Kepong Metro Prima

Induksi PPL
Tarikh: 21-22 Okt 2017
Tempat: Kepong Metro Prima

Faedah kursus kepada peserta
* Berpengetahuan mengenai Pentauliahan Persijilan melalui konsep Persijilan & Sistem Latihan Dual Nasioan (SLDN).
* Peningkatan kelayakan personel untuk pembangunan kerjaya
* Dapat menyediakan panduan & motivasi kepada masyarakat dan organisasi dalam aspek pembangunan & penilaian Pusat Bertauliah.Berpeluang menjadi Tenaga pakar Industri Negara (DPIN)
* Persijilan yang diiktiraf oleh pihak Awam & SwastaFaedah kursus kepada organisasi-* * Mempunyai aset dalam aspek jaminan mutu pentauliahan Pusat Bertauliah
* Mempunyai personel yang berkelayakan & diiktiraf
* Kualiti Pusat Bertauliah dan daya saing dapat ditingkatkan

Siapa yang WAJIB hadir?
a) Calon Pegawai Pengesah Luaran
b) Calon Pegawai Pengesah luaran SLDN
c) PP-PPT yang ingin dilantik sebagai PPL-PPT
d) Individu yang terlibat dengan pengendalian Pusat Bertauliah (PB) atau bakal dilantik menjadi PP, PPD atau PPB di PB (induksi PP, PPD & PPB

Kenapa perlu hadir (induksi PPL)?
a) Memenuhi syarat untuk menjadi PPL
b) Memahami tugas dan tanggungjawab PPL

Syarat
a) 18 tahun ke atas
b) Warganegara Malaysia atau PR
c) Telah lulus kursus induksi PP-PPD (untuk PPL sahaja)

Untuk pengesahan tempat anda, sila isi borang permohonan yg boleh dimuat turun dari sini http://jpkmalaysia.com/?attachment_id=603, kemudian emel kembali bersama slip bayaran ke ismarteducare@gmail.com.

Butiran Bank: I Smart Educare, Maybank 514589203020
Yuran: RM350 + 10 (caj pengeposan sijil)

Manyin: Stop stigmatising vocational education

Manyin presents a trophy and certificate to a student. At left is Kuching Vocational College director Ng Fook Yin. — Photo by Chimon Upon

KUCHING: Vocational education should not be stigmatised as an option for dropouts because skilled workers are key to steering Malaysia towards developed nation status.

Minister of Education, Science and Technological Research Dato Sri Michael Manyin Jawong stressed that parents should instead motivate their children to go for vocational training.

According to him, as early as the 1970s, vocational education became stigmatised as the option for dropouts who failed to excel in public examinations.

“At that time, people thought that you’re there because you’re a dropout, so vocational school was not very popular. Our education system is academic-centric and does not emphasise skills training,” he said during the Kuching Vocational College’s awards presentation ceremony yesterday.

“This is why today we are so far behind in terms of skilled workers compared to other developed nations.” Manyin said Malaysia only has a 7 per cent skilled workforce at present compared to South Korea’s 96 per cent, Germany at 80 per cent, the United States at 75 per cent, and China at 45 per cent.

“Malaysia has only 7 per cent, so how do we compete with the world? So we don’t talk about the 4.0 industrial revolution. We are now still at 2.0 industrial stage,” he lamented.

Manyin pointed out that in the next five to 10 years, about 80 per cent of jobs would be science- and engineering- or skills-based.

He also quoted a projection that 1.5 million jobs in Malaysia would require skills training by 2020.

“Our education system is too exam-oriented and in Malaysia, people are embarrassed to tell others that ‘I’m a plumber’ or ‘I’m an electrician’. In Germany, they don’t ask you what degree you have, but what skills you have,” he added.

He stressed that with the right training, skilled workers could even earn more than those in other sectors.

“Get the correct training and you will be the future of Malaysia. When we reach 4.0 industrial revolution, those with degree qualifications might not be able to get jobs but with specific skills, you will be competitive and employable.

Let vocational training be the first choice for our boys and girls. Tell the world that you have skills, that you can be more productive than others,” he said.