2018 Budget: TVET Malaysia Master Plan unveiled, RM4.9bil allocated

All Technical and Vocational Education Training institutions previously under seven ministries will be rebranded as TVET Malaysia and placed under the Human Resources Ministry.

KUALA LUMPUR: All Technical and Vocational Education Training institutions previously under seven ministries will be rebranded as TVET Malaysia and placed under the Human Resources Ministry.

Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Razak said today that RM4.9 billion will also be allocated to implement the TVET Malaysia Master Plan.

“To encourage TVET graduates to continue their studies, the government has prepared 100 TVET Excellent Students Scholarships worth RM4.5 million,” he added.

The government will also create the National Rail Centre of Excellence in a bid to support skilled workers in the rail industry.

The centre, he said, will supervise and coordinate quality assurance, as well as national rail education and training accreditation.

Najib also said Malaysia Rail Link Sdn Bhd, in cooperation with higher education institutions, will train 3,000 professionals in the industry.

Source: NST Online

Comment: It’s good that finally efforts can be streamlined. Hopefully the Ministry of Human Resources, especially the Department of Skills Development, has the extra capacity in terms of manpower & budget to execute policies well.

National Dual Training System (NDTS) / Sistem Latihan Dual Nasional (SLDN)

NDTS is an industry-oriented training program that combines workplace and institutional training.

School leavers or existing workers who meet the criteria can be offered as apprentices by a sponsoring company to undergo training.

A contract is signed between the company and the apprentices prior to the training. Apprentices are given certain amount of allowance throughout the training by the company and are obliged to work with the company upon completion if they are offered employment.

The hands-on training is conducted continuously and the apprentice is expected to get through the assessment as well as the final test which will be conducted at the end of the training programme. Successful apprentices will be awarded with the national skills qualification by Department of Skills Development (DSD).

SUMMARY

Participating in NDTS is an appropriate decision for every enterprise to make, in order to ensure that apprentices are trained to become k-workers for the development of human capital to steer Malaysia to become a developed nation by the year 2020.

With NDTS in place, Malaysia’s growth is well on its way towards an industry driven skilled workforce development approach. The opportunity to be a part of NDTS not only enhances corporate performance, but also represents a commitment to investment in human resources.

All companies and business enterprises are welcomed to participate and implement the NDTS. The system is established for company interest and benefit.

Department of Skills Development as the coordinating body will provide assistance and guidance to ensure that company can participate in the system.

For more info, please visit official DSD Website: www.dsd.gov.my

 

Time Frame The duration is based on the scope and level of certification
Practical-theory ratio 70 – 80 % Practical training in real work situations
30 – 20 % Related theory classes at training centers
Delivery Method Day Release System
-For example for a four-day practical training in companies, followed by one day class theory at training center.
Block Release System ( if necessary)
-For example 3-4 months, followed by practical training1-4 weeks of class-related theories.
Trainer SPM and / or employees working and selected by the company. The Company is not obligated to offer employment after completion of training
Training Allowance
(If training is carried out in 2 years )
Semester 1 – RM 350.00 Monthly
Semester 2 – RM 400.00 Monthly
Semester 3 – RM 450.00 Monthly
Semester 4 – RM 500.00 Monthly
Awarding Qualifications Certificate K-workers, equivalent to SKM Level 3 qualification or DKM (Level 4) or DLKM (Level 5) approved by the DSD and related employer organizations.

The NDTS with its industry oriented training concept is deemed superior to institutional-based training because:

i.        Minimize mismatch (quality and quantity) between the companies’ requirement and skilled workforce development through demand-driven orientation.

ii.        Training is based on work process approach under actual work conditions

iii.        The need for continuous technological advancement.

iv.        Minimize dependence on foreign workers.

v.        Increase the speed of  transferring technology by providing training in actual working environment

vi.        Inculcates positive training culture in companies, especially in SMEs.

Source: www.dsd.gov.my

Free higher education for all, Pakatan pledges in alternative budget

Pakatan Harapan said free education is imperative to address a lack of critical thinking skills desired by employers among graduates hunting for jobs. — Picture by Choo Choy MayPakatan Harapan said free education is imperative to address a lack of critical thinking skills desired by employers among graduates hunting for jobs. — Picture by Choo Choy MayKUALA LUMPUR, October 25 — Tertiary education will be free to everyone within 10 years if the Pakatan Harapan (PH) pact succeeds in taking control of Putrajaya in the next elections.

The federal Opposition pact made the pledge in its alternative Budget 2018 today, saying such a policy was possibly as it would conduct “a full audit and study on cost, wastage and corruption factors in all public universities”.

“Pakatan Harapan believes in free public education for all. The provision of free public university education is an ideal that we must achieve within 10 years of taking over government.

“Further, we need to help our graduates increase their employability and wages. To do this, Pakatan Harapan will place greater emphasis on Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET),” it said.

The Opposition alliance of PKR, DAP, Parti Amanah Negara and Parti Pribumi Bersatu Malaysia said free education is imperative to address a lack of critical thinking skills desired by employers among graduates hunting for jobs.

PH also said it would also expand the Penang government’s German Dual Vocational Training (GDVT), launched in 2015, into a nationwide programme.

It said that while the ruling Barisan Nasional administration’s Education Blueprint has identified TVET as a priority area, there are few resources for apprentice programmes.

“Under this programme, host companies are given funding to conduct on-the-job training for selected TVET students who can then go on to obtain jobs in the same companies or the same sector,” it added.

Source: Malaymailonline

Comment: Much that I laud PH’s pledge in its alternative Budget 2018 for free higher education in 10 years time should they come into power but saying that there are limited resources for apprentice programmes are not true. The government has allocated & spent quite a lot (I don’t have the figure but I can feel it as an industry player) to implement the National Dual Training System (NDTS) via the Department of Skills Development, Ministry of Human Resources. Nevertheless, it could have been better if leakages/corruption were to be minimized.

So, what’s NDTS & why NDTS? Well, that deserve another post 🙂

Program PVMA bantu selesai isu pelajar tercicir

SHAH ALAM – Pandangan Menteri Pembangunan Wanita, Keluarga dan Masyarakat (KPWKM), Datuk Seri Rohani Abdul Karim terhadap isu pelajar tercicir atau pelajar bermasalah boleh diselesaikan dengan cara yang lebih baik.

Sebaliknya menurut Pengerusi Jawatankuasa Bertindak ILKS Bumiputera, Nordin Abdul Malek, masalah pelajar tercicir mungkin dapat diatasi dengan kelas pemulihan atau kelas kemahiran di sekolah.

“Pihak kami menghormati pandangan banyak pihak terhadap isu ini. Bagaimanapun saya lihat tidak ada penyelesaian terbaik yang disuarakan oleh kerajaan.

“Pada pandangan kami, isu pelajar tercicir sepatutnya sudah ada penyelesaian.Pelajar yang bermasalah atau tidak minat untuk mengikuti  kelas kemahiran, yang mana ia diisi dengan aktiviti yang boleh membimbing semula mereka,” katanya kepada Sinar Online, hari ini.

Menurut beliau, kerajaan sepatutnya bekerjasama dengan pengusaha pusat latihan kemahiran bumiputera yang menguruskan Program Pendidikan Vokasional Menengah Atas (PVMA) untuk menyelesaikan isu tersebut.

“Kami berpengalaman lebih 20 tahun untuk menguruskan pelajar seperti ini dan kami mengambil pelajar mengikuti program kemahiran seawal tingkatan empat.

“Kami tawarkan kepada remaja atau pelajar yang kebanyakannya tidak berminat untuk mengikuti pembelajaran akademik,” jelasnya.

Kelmarin, Kementerian KPWKM  mencadangkan hukuman buang sekolah digantikan dengan kelas pemulihan atau peralihan untuk pelajar bermasalah yang diisi dengan aktiviti yang boleh membimbing semula mereka.

Rohani menyarankan Kementerian Pendidikan menimbang  semula hukuman buang sekolah itu memandangkan kebanyakan pelajar yang dibuang sekolah lebih terdedah untuk bergaul dengan golongan yang salah dan terlibat dengan jenayah.

[ARTIKEL BERKAITAN: Kaji semula hukuman buang sekolah]

Menurutnya lagi, program itu mampu meringankan bebanan guru dalam mengawal selia pelajar di sekolah.

“Setiap sekolah ada kelompok yang dianggap berisiko tinggi yang tidak berminat untuk meneruskan sesi pembelajaran. Mereka mempunyai sikap yang mengganggu keharmonian sekolah.

“Beban guru sudah terlalu tinggi. Mereka perlu fokus kepada pelajar yang mahu meneruskan pengajian dan dalam masa sama mereka perlu menumpukan perhatian kepada kelompok pelajar berisiko tinggi ini,” ujarnya lagi.

Sehubungan itu, beliau mencadangkan satu jawatan kuasa ditubuhkan kementerian bagi menangani masalah tersebut.

“Saya cadangkan tubuhkan task force dan jemput kami sebagai ahli jawatan kuasa memandangkan kami mempunyai pengalaman lebih 20 tahun dalam menguruskan kelompok pelajar tercicir,” katanya lagi.

Sumber: Sinar Harian

Ulasan: Pelajar PVMA lazimnya tiada 5 kredit, jadi, boleh mohon sambung belajar di pusat latihan kemahiran di Pusat Bertauliah JPK, boleh cari di sini

MAKLUMAN PELAKSANAAN SISTEM ESPKM VER 2.0 KEPADA SEMUA PUSAT BERTAULIAH (PB) DI BAWAH SISTEM PERSIJILAN KEMAHIRAN MALAYSIA(SPKM)

Ruj : JPK /700/43/1 Bil ( 50 )
Tarikh : 25 Oktober 2017

Salam Sejahtera dan Salam Kemahiran,

Adalah dimaklumkan Jabatan Pembangunan Kemahiran (JPK) telah membangunkan satu sistem yang dikenali sebagai Sistem eSPKM Ver 2.0 bagi memantapkan proses sedia ada dalam pelaksanaan Sistem Persijilan Kemahiran Malaysia (SPKM).

Mulai 1 Ogos 2017, penggunaan Sistem eSPKM Ver 2.0 ini telah dibuat secara Pilot Projek kepada semua PB Melaka untuk pendaftaran pelatih dan penilaian. Susulan daripada itu, Jabatan akan memperluaskan penggunaan sistem ini kepada semua PB lain. Sehubungan itu, semua PB hendaklah mengunakan Sistem eSPKM Ver 2.0 berkuatkuasa 1 November 2017 melalui capaian http://staging.skkm.gov.my/espkm Sebarang pertanyaan berkaitan penggunaan sistem ini bolehlah menghubungi helpdesk 03-8886 5527 dan 03-8886 2309.
Sekian,Terima Kasih.

“BERKHIDMAT UNTUK NEGARA”
“Pekerja Kreatif Pencetus Inovasi ’’
Ketua Pengarah
Jabatan Pembangunan Kemahiran
Kementerian Sumber Manusia

 

Muat turun Dokumen

save Makluman Pelaksanaan

save Carta Alir Proses Pendaftaran Pelatih

save Senarai Semak Pendaftaran Pelatih

save Panduan Penggunaan Sistem eSPKM Versi 2.0

900,000 new jobs require TVET under 11th Plan

Haslina (centre) presents a certificate to a graduand, as Mohd Nizam looks on.

MIRI: About 1.5 million new jobs are expected under the 11th Malaysia Plan (11MP) and 60 per cent of these jobs will require qualifications in technical and vocational training.

Ministry of Youth and Sports Deputy Secretary General (Strategic), Haslina Abdul Hamid said this shows that Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) is instrumental in providing the skilled manpower required for Malaysia to become a developed country by 2020.

Haslina said this when officiating at Institut Kemahiran Belia Negara (IKBN) Miri 10th Convocation Ceremony in Meritz Hotel yesterday. Also present at the function was IKBN Miri director Mohd Nizam Ismail.

“To fulfil the demands of industries, ‘Programme 20:50’ which aims to have 50 per cent skill courses by the year 2020, especially for those serving in the frontline in ILKBS (Ministry of Youths and Sports Training Institutes), will use English as a medium of instruction.

“As communication is among the soft-skills required in the job market, English has become an important element to equip and prepare these ILKBS students,” she said.

The ministry is hoping to attract and encourage youths to take up skill courses with ILKBS especially at IKBN Miri.

At the convocation ceremony 292 graduates received certificates in Automotive (178), Mechanical (18) and Hospitality (96).

“The ministry is also proud that there are some ILKBS alumni members who are serving in various industries within and outside the country, becoming successful entrepreneurs and earning high incomes,” she said.

Haslina disclosed that based on a research, the average monthly income for ILKBS graduates is between RM3,000 to RM60,000.

Comments: Unfortunately, in the race to achieve the numbers, the Ministry overlooked on the quality side. There’s some loopholes & weaknesses where so called experienced candidates who are not that expert in their field are able to obtain their SKM (Sijil Kemahiran Malaysia) via the RPEL  (PPT) method.

Source: The Borneo Post

Despite election budget, Malaysia still needs to tackle long-term structural problems: Experts

Despite election budget, Malaysia still needs to tackle long-term structural problems: Experts

After failing to get a job with her engineering degree, the Ipoh woman became a maid to make ends meet.

It is problems like these that economists say must be tackled in Budget 2018 even though it’s likely be filled with “election goodies” targeted at the ruling coalition’s traditional supporters.

Aid and handouts are important for a significant portion of the population in 2018, but structural reforms to solve issues like youth unemployment and stagnant wages are critical for the country in the next five years.

“It will be timely for Budget 2018 to catalyse the shift towards private sector-led and market-based approaches,” said Dr Yeah Kim Leng of Sunway University’s Business School.

“(This is) to address the stagnant wage, weak employment growth, low productivity and over-dependence on unskilled foreign workers.”

Other issues that experts said the government needs to deal with include being disciplined with how it spends public funds and reducing barriers to business to drive more investment.

Although the government is expected to spend more in 2018 over expectations that revenue will increase, it should not overspend, said Dr Yeah.

“The budget should continue its prudent and disciplined path of fiscal consolidation and deficit reduction as this will ensure sustainable growth, enhanced investor confidence.”

Economist Lee Heng Guie said whatever extra money that is earned should be spent efficiently.

“The government should stay the path of fiscal consolidation to ensure optimal deployment of resources and preserve fiscal stability,” said Mr Lee, who is with the Socio-Economic Research Centre.

“With a broad-based consumption tax (the goods and services tax), the federal government does not suffer from a lack of revenue (so) it’s important not to overspend and to plug leakages,” he added.

This year, the economy grew at a stronger pace after a slump of two years, said Mr Lee, powered by consumer spending, rebound in private investments and a strong surge in exports.

“Real GDP (gross domestic product) growth roared back to expand strongly by 5.7 per cent year-on-year in the first half of 2017.”

This has allowed the overall unemployment rate to remain low at 3.3 per cent.

But the youth unemployment rate hit 10.6 per cent in 2016 and about 23 per cent of university graduates are unemployed, said Mr Lee, which is a worrying figure.

“The youth employability must be tackled both at the supply- and demand-side equations. It is not just a simple mismatch between training and job requirements.”

It is a problem that is closely tied with the rapidly changing technological landscape, the quality and investment in universities and industries’ addiction to cheap, unskilled foreign labour, experts said.

Mr Lee noted that getting more youths back in the job market requires more money and emphasis on technical and vocational education and developing entrepreneurs.

Economist Raja Rasiah of Universiti Malaya said that the government should consider introducing incentives for the creation of a dual-training system like how Germany does it.

The renowned German education system sees vocational schools and small and medium companies work together to produce highly skilled workers for industries. It has been credited for keeping youth unemployment low.

Dr Rajah added that more money should be spent on creating entrepreneurship programmes in public and private universities.

Mr Lee said policies to help companies to invest in the “Fourth Industrial Revolution” will also create new skilled job opportunities.

“The revolution is essentially about ‘smart factories’, leveraging on robotics, digitalised data censoring, the internet of things to reap cost savings in real-time quality control and maintenance.”

This calls for targeted incentives and grants, investment capital allowance and high-tech Industrial Adjustment Fund to facilitate more manufacturers, especially small and medium enterprises to automate and embrace industrial internet, he observed.

Upgrading the country’s industrial base will also help deal with another economic bugbear – addiction to low-skilled foreign workers.

Manufacturing firms need to be pushed more to upgrade their operations so that they relied less on low-skilled foreign workers, Dr Rajah stressed.

Lawmakers such as Mr Liew Chin Tong, said that Malaysia’s unchecked use of low-skilled foreign workers had led to depressed wages for everyone.

“(An) influx of unskilled foreign labour hurts the wages of Malaysians at all levels, not just for labour,” Mr Liew wrote on his blog.

“Since there is abundance of supply of labour, workers have no bargaining power to demand better pay and conditions in the ‘race to the bottom’ for wages.”

The use of less-skilled foreign labour in export-oriented firms has also reduced the pressure on firms to upgrade, said Dr Rajah.

Source: THE MALAYSIAN INSIGHT

Malaysia needs 45pc skilled workforce by 2030

KUALA LUMPUR, Oct 20 — At least, 45 per cent of the total workforce need to be skilled workers by 2030 to help realise Malaysia’s goal as a developed high income nation, says Yayasan Melaka International College chief executive Datuk Saroni Judi.

He said in this regard, the skilled workforce needed to be upgraded with continuous training to be more competitive in employment and to command higher earnings.

“Efforts in empowering TVET (Technical and Vocational Education and Training) have resulted in TVET gaining more recognition in the world for its role in the economic development of the country.

“Malaysia has almost 28 per cent skilled workers and targets to raise it to 35 per cent by 2020, while a developed nation like Switzerland has almost 50 per cent skilled manpower,” he added in a statement here today.

Saroni said investment in education was important to contribute to the wellbeing of the people inclusively and sustainably where the government through human resource development programmes allocated RM50 million to create competitive workers at global level.

Apart from that, the government was also committed to ensure TVET was implemented effectively by recognising the field as the third thrust in the 11th Malaysia Plan (11MP), he said. — Bernama

TEMPOH MASA PERMOHONAN PENGELUARAN SIJIL SKM/DKM/DLKM/PC DI BAWAH PUSAT BERTAULIAH (PB)

Ruj     : JPK/700/51 Jld 13 (  31   )

Tarikh : 3 Oktober 2017

Salam Sejahtera dan Salam Negaraku,

Adalah dimaklumkan Jabatan Pembangunan Kemahiran (JPK) sedang dalam proses penambahbaikan pengurusan Sijil SKM/DKM/DLKM/PC di bawah kendalian Jabatan ini.

Sehubungan dengan itu, PB adalah dinasihatkan supaya membuat semakan status permohonan lengkap  pengeluaran Sijil SKM/DKM/DLKM/PC kepada JPK selepas tiga (3) bulan daripada permohonan Sijil dikemukakan kepada JPK sekiranya masih belum menerima Sijil tersebut. Sekiranya PB gagal untuk membuat semakan status Sijil tersebut selepas enam (6) bulan dari tarikh permohonan lengkap, PB dikehendaki mengemukakan bukti-bukti permohonan pengeluaran Sijil terdahulu sebagai bukti pengesahan kepada JPK.

Selain itu, bagi PB yang telah menerima Sijil SKM/DKM/DLKM/PC tetapi terdapat kesilapan pada Sijil  tersebut, PB hendaklah mengemukakan permohonan pembetulan Sijil tersebut dalam tempoh dua(2) bulan selepas tarikh cetakan Sijil tersebut.

Peraturan baharu ini berkuatkuasa bagi permohonan pengeluaran Sijil SKM/DKM/DLKM/PC yang diterima bermula 1 November 2017.

Sekian terima kasih.

“BERKHIDMAT UNTUK NEGARA”

“Pekerja Kreatif Pencetus Inovasi”

Ketua Pengarah

Jabatan Pembangunan Kemahiran

Kementerian Sumber Manusia

How Do We Equip Malaysia’s Workforce For Industry 4.0

The focus of Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) recently received widespread attention in Malaysia, after Datuk Seri Najib Razak announced the government’s plan to develop a comprehensive TVET plan to help the future workforce in facing the Fourth Industrial Revolution.

Coined by German economist Klaus Schwab in 2015, the Fourth Industrial Revolution is used to describe the emergence of the Digital Economy and use of automation and data exchange in industrial technologies. Commonly referred to with the catchprase Industry 4.0 it also included the Internet of Things and collaboration between networked machines and human beings in decision-making.

We might not feel it in our daily lives but robots and computers are slowly replacing some traditional jobs from the last century and creeping into our daily lives in the form of smart appliances and machines with computer programmes that can learn our habits and preferences.

Technology experts are already speaking about the coming industrial revolution as one that has the potential to disrupt every industry in every country due to the exponential pace that is the nature of digital revolution which is at the heart of Industry 4.0

This is already happening in businesses and industries as robotics and artificial intelligence can take over jobs traditionally manned by human labour, in particular technical processes that can easily be computerised.

As for the Malaysian government, they are going to allocate RM 50 million from 30 % of the Human Resources Development Fund (HRDF) funds collected for the purpose of TVET, to increase competitiveness as well as improving the calibre of the workforce and the nation’s economic development.

While our nation is still in the process of streamlining vocational education to meet international standards, it also has to grapple with revamping the same fledgling TVET education structure to ensure the skills taught are not at risk of becoming obsolete.

What skills and education do TVET students need in order to ride the coming digital revolution and not risk having their expertise be replaced by a computerised machine?

To understand the importance of TVET in facing Industry 4.0, Malaysian Digest reached out to industry insiders for an insight on the matter.

Malaysia Is Lagging Behind Its Southeast Asian Neighbours In Implementing Vocational Education

Malaysian Digest interviewed Adlan Ali, an electrical engineering and TVET lecturer in Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Melaka (UTeM). He has written many papers relating to TVET education, and have collaborated with many academic institutions, private companies and government agencies relating to TVET for the past 18 years.

Adlan Ali. Photo: UTeMAdlan Ali. Photo: UTeM“According to a report by the United Nations International Centre For Technical and Vocational Education and Training (UNEVOC), our country is still under the “awaiting validation” status. Meanwhile our neighbouring Southeast Asian countries such as Thailand, Phillipines, Indonesia, Myanmar and Cambodia have already been on the database way ahead of us,” said Adlan.

One of the reasons why our country is lacking in structured TVET education is because currently seven ministries and almost all state governments are running it.

Adlan strongly feels that this stands in the way of proper establishment for TVET governance, which is one the requirements to be fulfilled before Malaysia can be listed on the World TVET Database.

Fortunately, the government has realised the importance of TVET education, and has included its agenda as the third core in the 11th Malaysia Plan to elevate human resources development and making TVET transformation an identified focus field.

TVET lecturers around the country also collaborated to create a structure for the TVET education.

“Starting from a small fund of research grant and a small group of individuals, we have managed to collaborate together and developed the National Occupational Skills Standard (NOSS) for TVET Lecturers, Trainers and Educators. The NOSS has been recently approved and the name of the NOSS is TVET Implementation and Development,” he said, and members of the organisation include lecturers from UTeM, UniKL, UniMAP, Malaysia Science Academy and many other agencies.

As for adapting to Industry 4.0, TVET providers have seriously reviewed their existing programme’s objectives and learning outcomes to ensure FIR is well-stated and learned.

In the case of UTeM, they have recently reviewed its academic programmes at the university level, as well as offering new academic programmes that are tailored and suited towards the FIR.

Malaysia is yet to achieve a validated status by UNEVOC.Malaysia is yet to achieve a validated status by UNEVOC.

In order for the government to decide which industries must be focused in the current TVET education, all ministries and state governments must work with the Ministry Of Human Resource, under the Industry Skills Committee (Jawatankuasa Kemahiran Industri – JKI) and Skills Development Department (Jabatan Pembangunan Kemahiran – JPK).

“That way, we can detect what industries are potentially booming in the country and internationally, what industries are currently lacking competent workers what level of position the industries are lacking such as managers, engineers and technicians,” opined Adlan.

Most TVET graduates will be working in small-and-medium enterprises (SMEs). However, according to the Malaysian Productivity Corporation (MPC), ICT adoption by SMEs in Malaysia is a mere 10%. This is in stark contrast to other developed countries where the adoption stands at 50%. To meet the technological demands of Industry 4.0, ICT education must be taught to TVET students as well.

“Malaysian Industrial Development Authority (MIDA) has got to be given more roles and obligations, to ensure FIR is well within reach of the SMEs and very objective to be achieved.

“The partnership / collaboration between industries – TVET institutions must be made top priority because as far as I’m concerned, the existing scenarios are not that encouraging as the industries are focusing on meeting their production target, while the TVET institutions are focusing on their ‘on-paper only’ planning,” he explained.

The key to implementing TVET education in Malaysia, according to Adlan, is awareness. Industries must support the government’s plans and aspirations, helping the workers grow, and making the country’s TVET on par with the developed countries.

“At national level, we may talk about TVET and FIR but at the production and manufacturing ground level, I believe the awareness are still below par. With the existing global economic scenarios and Malaysian currency exchange, industries tends to commit on productions cum profits rather than focusing on TVET and Industry 4.0,” he shared with Malaysian Digest.

As Adlan highlighted, looking at the big picture is one thing but what about the actual situation on the ground? Malaysian Digest looks at the measures taken by local vocational training organizations to ensure their students can be at the forefront of the coming fourth industrial revolution.

GiatMara’s Role In Enhancing Skills, Knowledge Of The Nation’s Youth

GIATMARA is a government institution providing technical and vocational skills training to youths in rural and urban areas. Their aim is to ensure the students are equipped with the valuable skills to become technical entrepreneurs and workforce in fulfilling the country’s industrial needs.

In understanding how GIATMARA is helping the youths to adapt to today’s challenges created by FIR, Malaysian Digest contacted Dato’ Arman Azha, the deputy chairman of GIATMARA.

Dato' Arman Azha.Dato’ Arman Azha.“GIATMARA focuses on hands-on education, rather than theory-based reading. We have 231 GIATMARA centers all over the country,” he briefed Malaysian Digest.

Before the implementation of TVET education by Datuk Seri Najib Razak two years ago, GIATMARA created 22,000 graduates annually. Out of the 22,000 graduates, only 10% will be entrepreneurs, while the rest will be working in factories and workshops.

“However, since about one year ago, we decided to teach entrepreneurship skills to our students as well. From there, we created a course called Mobilepreneur Muda (Young Mobilepreneurs) in collaboration with Minister of Rural and Regional Development,” explained Dato’ Armand, in which the aim of the programme is at least 50% of their graduates will become SME entrepreneurs.

On top of the normal vocational lessons, the qualified students under this program will receive some assistance in the form of free motorbikes to help them move around, as well as equipment related to their vocational training. More importantly, they are taught to utilise technology to promote themselves in the digital market and adapt to the challenges of FIR.

In the past, GIATMARA provided small financial assistance to its graduates in helping them adapt to the industry. However, many of them mismanaged the money, so the organisation decided to help with other form of assistance.

“Instead of providing financial assistance, this programme is much more efficient and cheaper as well. In six months, the students under the programme must show their progress after we helped them.

“If they are doing well, then the equipment and motorbike will be given to them for free. On the other hand, if they failed to utilise our assistance well, we have the right to take the motorbike back,” he explained.

Mobilepreneur Muda intends to help vocational graduates in kickstarting their business.Mobilepreneur Muda intends to help vocational graduates in kickstarting their business.

This year alone, the programme has helped 3,000 young TVET enterpreneurs. Other than creating new programmes, GIATMARA also revises their curriculum and creates new courses to adapt to today’s demands that are shaped by the FIR.

New courses include aircraft maintenance, heavy machine maintenance and many others that are in high demand.

GIATMARA also realises the crucial role of technology in creating successful SMEs, and students are encouraged to make full use of the technology such as social media and smartphone applications to promote their businesses.

“In facing the FIR, we are providing digital courses as well, such as online marketing and graphic design.

“GIATMARA also revises our courses from time to time to ensure our courses remain relevant with today’s technological demands,” he concluded.

Introducing TVET Education To Tahfiz Students To Prepare For Industry 4.0

Maahad Tahfiz Vokasional Aman Bistari in Puchong.Maahad Tahfiz Vokasional Aman Bistari in Puchong.

One of the main points in Datuk Seri Najib Razak’s recently launched TVET initiative is to introduce TVET educational to tahfiz students as value add for them, whereby besides memorising the Quran, they would also have valuable trade skills.

The initiative is highly lauded by Mohd Asri Yunus, founder and principal of Maahad Tahfiz Vokasional Aman Bistari, a group of tahfiz schools in Malaysia that teaches not only Islamic knowledge, but vocational training as well.

Mohd Asri Yunus.Mohd Asri Yunus.“The first school was founded back in 2009. At first, we only taught culinary skills to our students. Over the years, we have expanded to nine vocational courses on top of culinary, such as sewing, calligraphy, animation, automotive repair, and farming,” explained Mohd Asri to Malaysian Digest.

While the students are learning the vocational skills, Islamic knowledge is at the core of the school’s basic education.

Maahad Tahfiz Vokasional Aman Bistari is the first vocational tahfiz center in the country, and since their inception have grown to six campuses all over Malaysia.

Students in the culinary hall.Students in the culinary hall.

A vocational institution graduate himself and former oil-and-gas employee, Mohd Asri was requested by the late Kelantan chief minister Tuan Guru Nik Aziz to transform traditional tahfiz center systems into a more modern system, one that teaches skills outside of religious knowledge as well.

“The syllabus that is taught in our centers is on par with the ones being taught at normal vocational institutions. Our equipment is industrial-grade, and we have spent more than RM60,000 to equip our schools.

“Even for our teachers, our tahfiz center hires industry veterans with certified qualifications and years of experience. For example, our culinary teachers are consultants to Federal Agricultural Marketing Authority (FAMA) and many universities,” he said. In the future, the tahfiz center aims to create hospitality and mold-and-die manufacturing courses.

The center takes in students up to 17 years old, and prides itself of being a tahfiz center that teaches worldly skills on top of religious knowledge.

According to Mohd Asri, students in his center are less likely to lose interest in memorising the Quran as they are also taught interesting courses in between Quranic lessons.

The skills taught to the students are designed so that once they graduate, they can immediately work in their respective fields. The culinary students of the tahfiz center run their own conventional catering service for weddings and special functions, and the sewing students also take up orders from customers outside the tahfiz center so that the students can develop their skills to be marketable.

The students providing catering service to a special function.The students providing catering service to a special function.

“We emphasise hands-on approach. They prepare all the foods that the students eat, and the students sewed their own clothes as well. Once the students have been with us for more than a year, they will be sent to the industry for on-the-job training.”

The center is registered under the Selangor Islamic Department (JAIS) and receives funding from the parents, corporate sponsorships and state government. Even though their education is separate from the national school system, the students can take their SPM examinations when they are 18 years old.

Mohd Asri encourages other tahfiz centers to develop vocational education as well, however he admits that creating such education is not easy.

“For one, hiring the right teachers is difficult. Many qualified individuals refuse to work with tahfiz centers, and sometimes, the tahfiz centers have issues with hiring teachers that are not of religious background.

“For me, I do not care whether the teachers are religious or not. We only employ them for their expertise, and sometimes the teachers can learn religious matters from the students as well,” he relayed to Malaysian Digest.

Other challenges include high cost of starting vocational education, but Mohd Asri has seen tahfiz centers taking their own initiatives to help their students learn much-needed vocational skills. Some centers have collaborated with their local vocational centers and community colleges to teach the tahfiz students.

Many of Aman Bistari’s graduates have found jobs or even started their own businesses thanks to the skills learned while they were in the center. Mohd Asri hopes that his center can be an example for other tahfiz centers to follow to add value to their students, and embrace the call to TVET education by Datuk Seri Najib Razak.

— Malaysian Digest