Najib to launch TVet Malaysia

MIRI: Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Tun Razak is scheduled to launch Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVet) Malaysia on Sept 27.

Minister of Human Resources Datuk Seri Richard Riot Jaem said TVet Malaysia is the Ministry of Human Resources’ (KSM) branding initiative for its TVet programme.

“KSM will continue to empower TVet to be the top choice among the people, including through the launch of TVet Malaysia,” he told a press conference after the Manpower Training Institute (ILJTM) convocation ceremony at the Industrial Training Institute (ILP) Miri on Tuesday.

“I believe that through TVet Malaysia, the number of skilled workers in the country will be improve and will achieve the target of 35 per cent of skilled manpower by 2020.”

He stressed that TVet contributes to a high-income economy and should not be considered a second choice.

Riot added ILJTM will ensure its courses are relevant to National Transformation 2050 (TN50).

“I urge more students to venture into technical and vocational fields to a higher level to meet the needs of local and global industries,” he said.

He noted that 92 per cent of ILJTM graduates, including from ILP and Advanced Technology Training Centre (Adtec), were employed within six months after graduation.

The convocation ceremony saw the presentation of 129 diplomas and 664 certificates to ILP Miri, ILP Kota Samarahan and Adtec Bintulu graduates.

Ministry of Human Resources main driver in developing TVET in Malaysia

Datuk Seri Richard Riot

MIRI: The role of the Ministry of Human Resources as the main driver in developing technical and vocational education and training (TVET) in Malaysia is undisputed, said its minister Dato Sri Richard Riot Jaem.

According to him, various programmes have been designed through the Skills Development Department (JPK) to uphold skills training in tandem with the latest industry and technology development.

“The state has taken a serious emphasis on technical education in the effort to produce a skilled workforce to meet the needs of the industry, especially in the Sarawak Corridor of Renewable Energy (SCORE) development region.

He pointed out that the direct involvement of JPK and the state government in promoting skills training to youths is a proactive move.

“By organising Sarawak World Skills Competition 2017, which began in late August until September 2017, it proves our seriousness in recognising local youth talent in the competing skills fields so it can be featured until the international level,” he said at the ministry’s ‘Majlis Jalinan Ramah Mesra’ dinner here on Monday.

Riot pointed out that his ministry has always been involved in the industry to ensure that students at the Human Resources Department Training Institute (ILJTM) students are exposed to the latest training to enhance their skills.

“A Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) was signed by ILJTM in Sarawak with, among others, Petronas Carigali, Sarawak Energy and Telekom Malaysia. These collaborations are aimed at training students in relevant industry fields,” he said, adding such efforts are value-added to students and will make them more competitive, as well as increase their level of workability in the marketplace.

Riot also highlighted the achievements of former ILJTM graduates in their respective fields who are currently earning high salaries.

“I was made to understand that one of the graduates of Industrial Training Institute (ILP) Kota Samarahan, namely Michael Likik Engong, is working as a senior machinist at Heerema Marine Contractors in the Netherlands and is earning a monthly income above RM20,000.

“Congratulations too to ILP Miri on its Welder Arm project victory in the Asean New Invention Innovation category at Crown Prince CIPTA Award 2017 in Brunei last May. This proves that the Manpower Department (JTM) succeeds in producing high-profile and high-income human capital,” he said.

Assistant Minister of Tourism, Arts and Culture Datuk Lee Kim Shin and JTM deputy director general Norman Kusin were among those present at the dinner.

Concerns raised over racial polarisation at public vocational schools

Educationist says government should look into the extremely low non-Malay student enrolment at public vocational schools, noting that most non-Malays enrolled in private vocational institutions.

TVEt_traning_vocational-schools_600

KUALA LUMPUR: Public technical vocational education and training (TVET) institutes in Malaysia are dominated by Malay students, raising concerns among educationists of racial polarisation at such establishments.

Chang Yun Fah, who is a lecturer at Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman (UTAR), claimed that over 90% of students enrolled at public TVET institutions were Malay.

“There appears to be a racial imbalance of ratio in the enrolment of students in public TVET institutes.

“A vast majority of these students belong to the Malay ethnic group. The cause of this must be ascertained and understood,” Chang said at a forum yesterday on issues concerning higher learning institutes.

Chang said in 2010, only 1.6% of about 60,590 students enrolled in public vocational and technical schools were non-Malay.

“While most Malays are in public TVET institutions, most non-Malays enrolled in private TVET institutions,” he added.

He said the government should address the issue and determine whether it is due to monocultural or monolingual environments.

“Academically weak non-Malay students who are not proficient in Bahasa Melayu must be given attention,” he said, adding that a multilingual approach in running TVET courses should be considered.

“Efforts in ensuring equal opportunities in TVET institutions should be included in the Malaysian Higher Education Blueprint 2015-2025 (HEB).”

To eliminate racial polarisation in TVET institutions, Chang said the education ministry should ensure in both policy and practice that all opportunities for education were open to all Malaysians, regardless of race or creed.

He was speaking at a forum after the launch of a book titled “Feedback and Recommendations on HEB 2015-2025”, a response by an education pressure group called the National Education Reform Initiative (NERI) to the education blueprint.

HEB was made public in April 2015.

NERI is a coalition of 17 non-governmental organisations created in 2014, comprising educationists, researchers and scholars.

Source: http://www.freemalaysiatoday.com

Comment: I personally view that one of the challenges is the delivery medium, where most if not all public TVET institutions teaches in the national language & the candidates are usually very weak in the language, hence they couldn’t cope or not interested with what’s being taught in their previous school prior to being a dropout or completed their studies with low academic results. 

Vocational grads are in demand

KUALA LUMPUR: The starting salary of vocational and technical graduates at between RM2,000 and RM5,000 a month is comparable to university graduates, said Deputy Education Minister Datuk Chong Sin Woon.

“They are highly sought after by industries – 90% of the cohort in our TVET (technical and vocational education and training) who graduated last year are already employed,” said Chong to reporters after the opening of the third High Officials’ Meeting on South-East Asia TVET here yesterday.

He reiterated his call to parents, particularly from the Chinese community, to change the outdated view that university education was more prestigious, especially when university graduates were struggling to secure jobs.

“Vocational and technical graduates don’t just end up opening beauty salons or bakeries, many of them work for multinational companies like (aircraft manufacturer) Boeing, which has a service centre in Malaysia.

“If your children aren’t interested in academic studies, don’t force them. Let them choose their career paths according to their interests,” he said.

Chong said the country urgently needed vocational graduates to build a skilled workforce which was necessary to support industries in aviation, automobile, manufacturing and oil and gas.

“Only 8% of our secondary students are in TVET.

“This is low compared to advanced countries like Germany and Switzerland, where almost 60% of their students are in TVET,” Chong said, adding that the Government also aimed to increase the percentage to 20% by 2020.

In line with that, Chong said the Government had introduced the “Upper Secondary School Industry Apprenticeship” (Pima) at a national school this year, and planned to roll it out to other interested national schools.

Involving only Form Four and Five students, those who join Pima will spend 70% of their time in industrial training and 30% in academic studies.

At the end of the programme, the students will receive a certificate – Sijil Pelajaran Malaysia or Sijil Kemahiran Malaysia.

The Government is also converting unused teachers’ training institutes into polytechnics and vocational colleges.

The High Officials’ Meeting on South-East Asia TVET aims to create a network among leaders in the field and related development agencies in the region.

It also promotes exchange programmes among lecturers and students, joint research programmes and industrial linkages.

Chong said Malaysia, Thailand and Indonesia were among the most active in the network.
Read more at http://www.thestar.com.my/news/nation/2017/05/24/chong-vocational-grads-are-in-demand-tvet-students-are-highly-sought-after-by-industries-and-earn-go/#aMG8HIuZv9p5JeZK.99

College, industries sign MoU to promote technical education

Sahran (left) exchanges the MoU documents with a representative of 28 TVET-related industry players, witnessed by Fazzrudin (second left) and Zainuren. — Photo by Muhammad Rais Sanusi

KUCHING: Kolej Vokasional Matang has reached another milestone with the signing of a memorandum of understanding (MoU) aimed at establishing partnership with 28 local industries and intensifying the development of highly-skilled students.

Education Ministry’s technical education and vocational training (school division) director Zainuren Mohd Nor said the MoU was vital as it encouraged the sharing of expertise and technology between industry players and the college, as well as to promote technical education.

According to him, the government realises the importance of technical and vocational education and training (TVET)-related skills in order to attain the ‘First World’ country status by 2020.

Statistics have shown a low turnout of students in the country pursuing technical education – constituting only seven per cent out of the total number of students.

However, society now realises the importance of TVET. It is estimated that 1.6 million jobs would be created across all economic corridors throughout the nation by 2020.

“Our country is still far behind in terms of technical education and vocational training compared with other developed countries. One of the factors is the lack of interest among students in technical courses.

“It is hoped that in years to come, more students would opt for technical education and vocational training in order to secure a better future with high salaries,” he said at the MoU signing ceremony between Kolej Vokasional Matang and the 28 TVET-related industries at Yayasan Sarawak auditorium here yesterday.

Moreover, Zainuren disclosed that under the Vocational Education Transformation Plan, the expectation for TVET students would be for 70 per cent of them to become skilled workers, 20 per cent to further their studies, and 10 per cent to become entrepreneurs.

Tupong assemblyman Fazzrudin Abdul Rahman and Kolej Vokasional Matang director Mohamad Sahran Amin were also present at the function.

Source: 

Kerajaan isytihar 2017 tahun TVET – Riot

RIOT: Kerajaan telah mengisytiharkan 2017 sebagai Tahun TVET dalam usaha mencapai status negara berpendapatan tinggi menjelang 2020.Kerajaan isytihar 2017 tahun TVET - Riot

SHAH ALAM: Kerajaan telah mengisytiharkan 2017 sebagai Tahun Pendidikan Teknikal dan Latihan Vokasional (TVET) dalam usaha mencapai status negara berpendapatan tinggi menjelang 2020, kata Menteri Sumber Manusia Datuk Seri Richard Riot Jaem.

Beliau berkata inisiatif itu juga seiring dengan ucapan Perdana Menteri Datuk Seri Najib Tun Razak semasa membentangkan Bajet 2017 bahawa keupayaan TVET akan dipertingkatkan di bawah bajet tersebut.

“Walaupun perkara ini tidak diumumkan secara rasmi sebelum ini, kalau kita nampak pada ucapan Najib dalam Bajet 2017 tempoh hari, perkataan TVET ditekankan.

“Ini bermakna, dengan penekanan ini, secara langsung dan tidak langsung, TVET menjadi permulaan kepada usaha kerajaan untuk lebih gigih dalam melahirkan ramai modal insan berkemahiran,” katanya pada sidang media selepas penyerahan akreditasi kepada Proton Holdings Berhad sebagai pusat sehenti untuk program Sistem Latihan Dual Nasional, di sini pada Khamis.

Riot berkata untuk mencapai status negara maju berpendapatan tinggi, tenaga kerja berkemahiran tinggi diperlukan dan setakat ini hanya 28 peratus modal insan Malaysia merupakan pekerja berkemahiran dan kerajaan menyasarkan untuk mencapai sekurang-kurangnya 35 peratus menjelang 2020.

Dalam perkembangan lain, beliau berkata Majlis Ekonomi Negara telah meluluskan cadangan Skim Insurans Pekerjaan (EIS) bagi membantu pekerja yang diberhentikan dan usul akan dibentang di Parlimen pada Januari 2018.

Sebelum ini, menteri itu dilapor berkata skim yang memperuntukkan sumbangan majikan dan pekerja itu amat penting untuk memastikan pekerja yang diberhentikan mampu menyara hidup sekurang-kurangnya selama empat bulan sebelum mendapat pekerjaan baharu.

Terdahulu, Riot menyampaikan Diploma Lanjutan Kemahiran Malaysia kepada 30 penerima selain menyaksikan pemeteraian memorandum persefahaman antara Proton dan Jabatan kemahiran Malaysia bagi program pembangunan jangka panjang pekerja berkemahiran.

Pada majlis itu, 27 individu menerima biasiswa Yayasan Proton untuk menyambung pendidikan peringkat Sijil Kemahiran malaysia.

– BERNAMA

Khairy: Public perception of vocational education has improved

Khairy with Malaysian Youth Council- 1Belia 1Kemahiran graduates at their convocation ceremony in Putrajaya. - Bernama

Khairy with Malaysian Youth Council- 1Belia 1Kemahiran graduates at their convocation ceremony in Putrajaya. – Bernama

PUTRAJAYA: The perception towards technical and vocational education and training (TVET) in Malaysia has improved over the past few years, and is no longer seen as a “last option” in career choices, says Khairy Jamaluddin.

The Youth and Sports Minister said the public has grown to realise the potential of TVET due to its importance to a developing nation and its high employability level.

“In conjunction with the 2010 National Youth Day, the Malaysian Youth Council launched the 1Youth 1Skill (1B1K) programme to help youths get involved in skills training programmes and select TVET as a career choice.

“At that time, society’s perception was that TVET is only for those who didn’t complete Form Five, those who were expelled from school or those who have been sent for juvenile rehabilitation.

“But today, the public have changed their mindset towards TVET. They do not see it as a second or last option in one’s career choice.

“People acknowledge that products of technical and vocational education are highly employable and have an easier career path.

“The Government recognises TVET graduates as assets to the country that we can be proud of.

“Graduates of the National Youth Skills Institute today have a 90% employability rate, which means nine out of 10 graduates will definitely get a job.

“Compare this to degree holders, who cannot land a job after graduating. Why? It’s because their courses are not tailored to the demands of the industry.

“Those who pursue TVET in Malaysia are assured that their training is in line with what the industry wants,” said Khairy in his speech at the fourth 1B1K convocation on Tuesday.

He said Malaysia should emulate developed countries like Germany, Japan and South Korea where TVET is given top recognition.

“These are countries that are more developed than Malaysia and are well-advanced in technology, ahead of others. They make TVET a priority in their education system.

“In Germany, nearly 60% of the students are in the vocational and technical stream. The country’s economy and advances in automative technology are spearheaded by the successes of TVET graduates.

“Malaysia should emulate these countries. And that is why the Government has invested a lot in TVET. The last budget saw RM1bil allocated to enhance the quality of TVET,” said Khairy.

He said 4,967 youths have received skills training at public and private institutes since the 1B1K programme was launched.

About 500 youths received their certificates at the convocation ceremony.

Source: The Star Online, 10th May 2016

Mahdzir: Malaysia TVET programmes leading in region

TVET

KUALA LUMPUR: Malaysia is at the forefront of Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) in the Asia-Pacific region with three local vocational learning institutes accredited the Gold level.

Education Minister Datuk Seri Mahdzir Khalid said the three institutes awarded the Asia-Pacific Accreditation and Certification Commission (APACC) were Politeknik Ungku Omar, Politeknik Sultan Salahuddin Abdul Aziz Shah, and Politeknik Sultan Ibrahim.

“This is a testimony of the quality of our TVET programmes which has gained international recognition in terms of standards that are comparable to other countries in the region,” Mahdzir said at the Asia-Pacific Education and Training Conference (ACET) in Berjaya Times Square Hotel today.

Despite the international recognition, he said, people still perceive vocational training as less desirable than pursuing higher academic learning.

Mahdzir said Malaysia under the Economic Transformation Programme (ETP) will require 2.5 times more TVET enrollment by 2025 but there is currently a shortage of such graduates.

“Currently, TVET programmes do not necessarily attract students with stronger academic qualifications. This could be due to a perception that TVET qualifications offer less attractive career and academic progression,” he said.

As such, he added, the National Education Blueprint 2015-2025 aims to promote vocational and skills training as a parallel path to success along with higher education.

Among the efforts undertaken by the Education and Higher Education Ministries are letting the industry design the curriculum in vocational schools, introducing apprenticeship, hands-on training, real-life simulations, and employer training programmes.

Another is to enhance coordination across the Ministry’s various TVET providers to eliminate redundant programmes, to provide greater specialisation in areas of expertise and improve cost efficiency.

Mahdzir added that TVET is one of Malaysia’s success stories and the ACET provides a platform for other countries to learn from it.

Source: Borneo Post Online, 1st May 2016

MCA Youth holds second round of vocational education talks

Leong (centre) and other MCA Youth members with posters promoting the talks.

KUALA LUMPUR: A series of technical and vocational education and training (TVET) education talk will be held in several states to promote its importance as an alternative education and career path for students.

MCA Youth secretary-general Datuk Leong Kim Soon said the second session of the talk was organised following the success of the first session in April.

“Unlike the first session which was organise in our headquarters and several MCA branches, this time, we will have it in secondary schools for students.

“We had the first educational talk of the second session in Segamat, Johor on Sept 13 and response was encouraging.

“More than 1,000 attendees are expected to attend the (TVET) educational talk and is open to the public,” he said during a press conference at Wisma MCA here.

The talks, organised by MCA Youth, will be held in Setiawan, Perak; Kapar, Selangor; Sungai Petani, Kedah; Kuala Lumpur, Seremban, Negeri Sembilan and Teluk Intan throughout October and November.

Leong reiterated that students should look into the importance of TVET as there was a severe shortage of skilled workers, especially in the agricultural and wood-based industries.

“Under the 11th Malaysia Plan (11MP), the Government announced an allocation of RM1bil for the Skills Development Fund for students to receive vocational education.

“However, vocational education should not be seen as an option for poor academic achievers but an additional choice for the right career path one wished to venture in,” he said,

“Parents should also encourage their children to consider vocational education as an alternative path in their career,” he said, adding that there will more talks to be added soon.

Technical training also for the gifted

START a conversation about the education system and someone is bound to be riled up. With global indicators showing that our children lag behind in literacy and numeracy skills, and our graduates lack soft skills and are unemployable, it’s hardly surprising.

The common view is that we need to do something about our education system. But are we certain of the real problems and how we should solve them? First, we know that our human capital falls short in quality and quantity. We need more graduates, particularly in the fields of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM). Statistics show that about two-thirds of our workforce have secondary qualifications and below.

We look up to South Korea and envy its achievement in economic and human capital development. It managed to escape the middle income trap when we haven’t. At an extraordinary rate of 98 per cent, it boasts the highest gross tertiary education enrolment rate in the world. Virtually all South Korean youth go to university after secondary school. Like South Korean parents, Malaysian parents, too, place a high value on university education. We take pride in our children who have obtained a place in universities, and even more so, if they are abroad.

More universities were built locally as demand for higher education spiked, especially with the opening up of the industry to private sector players. As a result, our gross enrolment rates have increased from about 22 per cent in 1998 to about 37 per cent in 2013.

But, along the way, we realise that this approach is slowly breaking down. The economy is suffering from a severe labour mismatch amidst the persistent shortfall in the number of students in STEM.

Perhaps the economy doesn’t need as many university graduates. Even South Korea is being saddled with the same realisation. Although employing about 90 per cent of the South Korean workforce, its small and medium enterprises are unable to attract local talents who instead prefer to work with the higher-paying chaebols, or the top-ranked companies. In 2011, Lee Myung-Bak, the former South Korean president, warned its youth against a reckless entrance into universities. The Economist magazine said that the country is “glutted with graduates”.

But culture and perceptions are not easily changed. Our people — students, parents and policymakers — remain obsessed with obtaining university degrees.

Nowadays, there is increasing attention towards technical and vocational education and training (TVET) and, as PEMANDU’s analysis has revealed, at least 40 per cent of the jobs to be created by 2020 require such qualifications.

A group of educationists and policymakers are now looking to countries, such as Switzerland and Germany, for inspiration. TVET in these countries not only have the society buy-in, it is also employer and market-driven. In Switzerland, about 70 per cent of its youth are enrolled in the vocational stream. About 30 per cent of Swiss companies host apprentices. Likewise, in Germany, about 60 per cent of high school graduates go on a vocational training programme that embeds workplace training. Learning by doing is the cornerstone of their education system. As a result, the labour market in both economies held up pretty well during the European and global economic slowdown.The unemployment rate of 15-to-24-year-olds is relatively close to the adults (25-year-olds and above) unemployment rate, at about 1.5 times, when the global average is about three times.

TVET in Malaysia has been evolving. From vocational schools where fourth formers interested in a vocational course had to apply to special schools, to vocational programmes where students can choose a course at their local school, to basic vocational education where students can enrol in the vocational stream as early as Form One.

Access to vocational education has expanded. But, the main problem remains. Notwithstanding our achievements, vocational education is still seen as a choice for the “less-academically inclined” — a sugar-coated, politically-correct term — instead of it being career-centred. The moment TVET is sold as a route for those unable to perform academically, the more able students and their parents will immediately shy away from this path. The most needed reform would thus be to appreciate that, as much as STEM is no superior to non-STEM, the academic field is also no superior to TVET.

The two famous Adi Putras in this country — one a Maths genius, the other an actor — are both stars, but they are completely different. The point is, TVET should be made available to all, including the talented. We have to decide whether we want to do a South Korea or a Switzerland. Stop tinkering, because we need a whole new system. The writer is an independent researcher

Read More : http://www.nst.com.my/news/2015/09/technical-training-also-gifted