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Syarat Asas Perlantikan Sebagai Pengajar Vokasional (Selain VTO) di Pusat Bertauliah JPK

Ya, ramai yang selalu tanya apakah syarat ambil VTO sebab nak jadi pengajar.
Tapi rasanya ramai juga yang tidak tahu bahawa selain kelayakan sijil VTO, dua lagi sijil yang diperlukan untuk dilantik sebagai pengajar vokasional  (biasanya Pegawai Penilai juga) adalah:1) Sijil induksi PP-PPD-PPB (memahami Sistem Persijilan Kemahiran Malaysia) – kursus 2 hari
2) Sijil SKM bidang kemahiran anda (cth elektrikal, automotif, kulinari, pendidikan awal kanak-kanak dsbgnya)

Tempoh sijil induksi anda dah tamat?
Bagi yang dah ada sijil induksi PP-PPD-PPB pula, tahukah anda ia ada tempoh tamat jika tak dilantik? (tak dilantik dlm tempoh 3 tahun sejak lulus induksi – jika anda lulus dlm tempoh Mac-Julai 2015)
Berikut adalah jadual tarikh kursus induksi yang dianjurkan oleh I Smart Educare.
PP-PPD
Tarikh: 7-8 Julai
Tempat: Kolej New Era, KajangTarikh: 28-29 Julai
Tempat: UniKL MIAT, Sepang

PP-PPT
1. Kiranya nak jadi PB-PPT, kena ada penyelaras PPT yg telah ikuti kursus induksi PP-PPT
2. Kiranya nak dilantik jadi PP-PPT bidang kemahiran anda (dah ada SKM & >10 thn pengalaman kerja)
3. Kiranya dah baca Panduan Permohonan SKM melalui PPT tapi masih tak tahu lagi macam mana nak mula
Tarikh: 11-12 Ogos
Tempat: I Smart Educare, Kepong

PPL (Syarat Tambahan – perlu lulus induksi PP-PPD-PPB dulu, selain SKM & pengalaman kerja >10 tahun)
1. Kiranya nak jadi PPL (ketua pengawas pemeriksaan akhir ke Pusat Bertauliah JPK, panel semasa lawatan permohonan/pembaharuan oleh PB)
Tarikh: 4-5 Ogos
Tempat: I Smart Educare, Kepong
Masa: 8.30-5pm
Yuran: RM350+10 (caj pos sijil)* termasuk nota, minum pagi, makan tengah hari & sijil dari JPK
Bayaran atas nama: ISE Education Sdn Bhd, Maybank 514589385943Tunggu apa lagi jika takda sijil diatas tapi minat untuk jadi pengajar vokasional/PP-PPT ataupun PPL?

Muat turun borang disini
Lepas isi & buat bayaran, sila emel slip bayaran serta borang permohonan anda ke ismarteducare@gmail.com

Hello Industrial Revolution 4.0! ― Nurul Izzah Anwar

Nurul Izzah says reforming TVET requires thinking beyond courses and institutions. — Picture by Yusof Mat Isa
Nurul Izzah says reforming TVET requires thinking beyond courses and institutions. — Picture by Yusof Mat Isa

KUALA LUMPUR, June 22 ― Seven ministries. Two Malaysia National Plans. More than RM10 billion spent in a span of three years, from 2015 to 2017. And where is TVET now? Plagued by stories of thousands of stranded, unqualified youths, awaiting placement and promise of a better future.

Regardless the state of affairs, everyone who cares about Malaysia’s future should support TVET as a means to empower Malaysia’s young ― in line with our upcoming embrace of Industrial Revolution 4.0.

Yesterday, Education Minister Dr Maszlee Malik announced my pro bono-related appointment as the head of the national taskforce on reforming our country’s Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) programme.

Today, the head of NUTP decides it was a non-starter, considering the mammoth powers required to structurally reform our TVET sector.

NUTP is certainly not wrong in raising concern on the viability of action pertaining to the Pandora’s box-filled TVET.

I recall a conversation with the Secretary-General of Youth and Sports Ministry, Datuk Lokman Hakim Ali, who filled with excitement, planned for our Institut Kemahiran Belia Negara (IKBN) to adopt IR 4.0 as part of its curriculum.

Clearly, to bear fruition, the new government would have to continue with worthier initiatives of its predecessor ― transparently, accountably and efficiently.

To succeed, we need all quarters onboard. This is our Malaysia. It requires all of us to make anything work.

Reforming TVET requires us to think bigger than just courses and institutions.

At its very heart, while we accept the fact that people come with different talents in this world, we have a system that only measures and rewards one, academic talent.

And students who don’t make the cut are thrown into a barrel we now call the TVET system.

This is a systemic problem. And we should treat it as such.

Few would dispute the necessity of TVET in a modern economy; through formal and informal learning, TVET seeks to train and equip individuals with technical skills for the purposes of employment within certain industries.

While conventional education obtained through completion of university remains relevant, the incorporation of TVET as a mainstream option is of equal importance for young Malaysians seeking technical expertise for the working world. TVET is also effective for developing a sustainable, inclusive and socially equitable society and thus should be central to plans for educational reform in Malaysia.

Although TVET has existed in various forms since the 10th and 11th Malaysia Plan, the reality is these efforts have been seriously disjointed in their implementation and are in dire need of thorough structural reforms.

TVET has almost been an afterthought, with incoherent policies often in conflict with each other. Current TVET efforts for example, are supply driven which sees individuals trained in certain skills first prior to any work placement, leading to a severe mismatch of skills and industry. Elsewhere, funding is usually wholly dependent on the government, a dependency which suggests a lack of focus on TVET should funds begin to dry up, as vocational training has not been a priority of the government in the past. Certification to this point has been optional for both individuals seeking work and businesses, which has led to a lack of standards in employment. Trainers involve in TVET have also lacked the quality required for those in their office, lacking clear industry expertise while usually poorly trained themselves. Additionally, synchronization with tertiary education has been found wanting, making it difficult for those with TVET skills and certification to pursue university degrees and higher learning.

Revamping TVET has always been a key goal for Pakatan Harapan, included in the manifesto where we have promised to develop technical and vocational schools to be on par with other streams making it a viable option or alternative to all. This includes setting up a full-board TVET school for outstanding students from all walks of life enabling greater access to opportunity for Malaysians.

Alongside these manifesto promises, significant overhaul is needed for TVET implementation both in the long and short term especially if we hope to make significant progress before by year end. We should look to adopt international best practices as has begun in Penang with the implementation of the German Dual Vocational Training (GDVT).

This scheme offers financial incentives to companies that offer industrial training and/or internships to TVET students. This is reflective of a demand-based approach, where industries are committed to offering apprenticeships based on their own requirements and TVET institutions meeting that demand.

This helps to ensure individuals are equipped with relevant skills and assured to a strong degree of employment, representing an efficient outcome for everyone involved.

Industries and chambers should lead the way as they are best positioned to know the needs of the economy, supported by federal and state governments. Reducing the dependence on the government for both financial and institutional support compliments an industry-driven approach with the state providing assistance as necessary.

Policy reform is thus the best approach for government, creating favourable conditions for TVET institutions and providing incentives to both trainers and trainees, while ensuring coordination between industries and training centres.

With proper oversight, coordinated by the Jabatan Pembangunan Kemahiran under the Ministry of Human Resources, work will be done to ensure proper certification at all levels of both training and business. Where certification was previously optional, it should now be made mandatory in order for those with TVET training to find employment as well as for businesses to be eligible to hire TVET graduates.

Such standardisation of qualifications is long overdue if we want to treat TVET with the same seriousness and respect accorded to tertiary education. Alongside this is better integration and crossovers with academic pathways to provide more opportunities for those who wish to further their formal education to enhance themselves as individuals or change their career entirely.

At present, a lack of integration and accreditation prevents TVET graduates from qualifying from degree programmes at universities. The Penang state government has sought to address this by introducing short term measures aimed at providing accreditation, measures that can further be improved with concerted federal support.

These policy suggestions barely scratch the surface of the potential of TVET, one that can be harnessed to the total benefit of Malaysia and Malaysians through an inclusive approach and better engagement with all stakeholders. These steps will go a long way to dial back on the stigma against TVET and its graduates through better integration in the economy, helping to increase their economic value and ultimately providing better wages.

A holistic improvement of education in Malaysia includes the recognition and enhancement of TVET, elevating it to a status equivalent or superior to traditional tertiary education.

We must demonstrate that a university education does not have to be the be-all-end-all goal for many Malaysians, that many alternatives exist alongside these options, while a system that has for so long practiced various forms of exclusion shall now be expanded to ensure no Malaysians are left behind.

The mandate given to me is to come up with a report on structurally reforming TVET before one year is up. I’ll make sure post engaging with stakeholders, we will have a clear operational step by step action plan.

I urge NUTP to be as loud and demanding as they are today. Time and tide waits for no ministers in implementing much needed reforms.

Malaysians, say hello to industrial revolution 4.0!

*Nurul Izzah Anwar is MP for Permatang Pauh, vice-president and co-elections director for Keadilan. Nurul Izzah wrote this for Malay Mail.

Nurul Izzah to head new committee on technical and vocational training development

Nurul Izzah will head a new committee on the government's Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) programme. — Picture by Yusof Mat Isa
Nurul Izzah will head a new committee on the government’s Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) programme. — Picture by Yusof Mat Isa

PUTRAJAYA, June 21 ― Permatang Pauh MP Nurul Izzah Anwar will be heading a new committee on the government’s Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) programme, under the Education Ministry, its minister Maszlee Malik said today.

“This committee’s role is to prepare a report to strengthen and upgrade the standard of TVET.

“YB Nurul Izzah is someone who is very concerned about TVET, and has discussed with me on how TVET can help youths compete for jobs and become entrepreneurs,” Maszlee said.

“The Pakatan Harapan government understands the importance of the technical and vocational stream, and in line with Pakatan Harapan’s manifesto, we are committed to develop this stream, so that it is truly on par with other streams, and is not viewed as a mere second choice,” he added.

Nurul Izzah when met, said that she hoped to make Malaysia’s technical and vocational training on par with that in Germany.

“We know that there are over half a million Malaysian children who are outside the formal education scope, so it is our duty to lift the standard of TVET, so they will feel confident, they will feel proud with the accreditation, as proud as they would be if they are medical doctors,” Nurul Izzah said.

In January, then human resources minister Datuk Seri Richard Riot said that a TVET Council will be established, and to be chaired by then-prime minister Datuk Seri Najib Razak.

Bernama quoted Richard as saying after a TVET ministerial coordination meeting that among others, the formulation of TVET master plan, which is expected to be ready by October 2018, involving industry engagement model, TVET financing model, matching demand to supply, strategic collaboration among TVET providers and efforts to achieve 35 per cent of skilled workforce by 2020, was discussed in the meeting.

Riot also reportedly announced the appointment of Limkokwing University of Creative Technology founder and president, Tan Sri Lim Kok Wing, as TVET Malaysia adviser.

Source: https://www.malaymail.com

PVMA programme put on ice

PETALING JAYA: Some 5,504 students are left in a bind after finis­hing school last year.

They had enrolled in the Pendidikan Vokasional Menengah Atas (PVMA) programme at their schools to receive Technical Voca­tional Education and Training (TVET) and were supposed to be awarded with two certificates — the Sijil Pelajaran Malaysia (SPM) and Malaysian Skills Certificate (SKM).

Unfortunately, 208 out of 269 national schools offering the PVMA programme have yet to be acc­re­­di­ted as SKM training centres to run it.

National Union of the Teaching Profession (NUTP) secretary-general Harry Tan (pic) told The Star that the PVMA programme was put on hold by the Education Ministry in February due to the matter.

“These schools are not recognised by the Department of Skills Development under the Human Resources Ministry because the teachers appointed to deliver the programme are unqualified,” he said in the interview.

A Human Resources Ministry guideline states that qualified teac­hers must have SKM qualification in the relevant programmes to assess the students’ programmes under Levels One and Two.

Currently, many of the teachers are SKM Level Two holders.

Tan said the equipment in the schools also do not comply with the regulations set by the Department of Skills Development.

Describing the situation as unfair towards affected students, Tan said those who have graduated from the programme are skilled and qualified but do not possess the paper qualifications.

Department of Skills Develop­ment director-general Nidzam Kamarul­zaman said schools must adhere to criteria before implementing SKM programmes.

“We also have a standard code of practice for schools to comply with.

“There are many elements involved, including having qualified instructors and trained teachers, meeting the requirements of our National Occupational Skills Standard and having a compound that is legal and safe for students.

“Serious consideration was not given towards the preparation of these schools (to run the programme),” he added.

Nidzam said the affected schools have since reached out to the department.

“We have been conducting meetings with them to correct the situation and we are targeting to solve the matter by next year,” he added.

An official from the ministry’s Technical and Vocational Education Division said a budget is set aside every year to be disbursed gradually to schools to buy necessary equipment.

“To resolve the equipment shortage issue, we began disbursing this year’s allocation last year, to speed up the process of accrediting these schools as approved training centres to run the PVMA.

He said the programme was temporarily suspended to allow the division to fully equip these schools before it resumes while schools that are already accredited are conducting the programme as per normal.

On the lack of trained SKM teachers, he said the division has begun the training process to tackle the issue.

While training takes only three months to complete, the official said due to the high number of teachers involved, it takes up to two years to complete.

Human Resources Minister M. Kulasegaran said earlier this month that the ministry plans to standardise and park all the vocational skills training centres under one ministry to eliminate redundancy.

Some skills training centres currently fall under the purview of the Education and Youth and Sports Ministries.

Tan said the 5,504 students are being asked by the Human Resources Ministry to sit for an assessment known as the Recognition of Prior Achievement (RPA or Pengiktirafan Pencapaian Terdahulu), that formally recognises their existing skills and enables them to pursue further studies in other TVET institutions.

Education Ministry officials said a special task force was set up at the end of last year between the ministry and the Department of Skills Development at the national level to resolve this issue.

The ministry, added the officials, set up an internal taskforce in January this year and a state-level taskforce to facilitate accreditation issues on the ground.

The affected students will complete the assessment between July and August this year and gain a Level Two SKM certificate by the end of the year.

By the end of 2018, students are expected to be certified with a SKM Level Two.

Source: https://www.thestar.com.my/news/nation/2018/06/21/pvma-programme-put-on-ice-5504-students-affected-by-education-ministrys-move/#AD9IV6CbohJcAluA.99

City & Guilds Group announces RM80,102 bursary funding for Malaysians

The City and Guilds bursary can be used for vocational and leadership courses provided by City and Guilds, and ILM across a variety of sectors.
The City and Guilds bursary can be used for vocational and leadership courses provided by City and Guilds, and ILM across a variety of sectors.

KUALA LUMPUR, June 13 — City & Guilds Group, a pioneer in global skills development, is currently accepting applications from Malaysians for its £15,000 (RM80,102) bursary programme.

The bursaries are available from a number of City & Guilds and ILM centres across Malaysia and aim to maximise accessibility to its vocational courses and training for all; ensuring that any individual in genuine financial need, who would otherwise struggle to complete a City & Guilds or ILM qualification, is given the opportunity to learn and develop their skills and fully contribute to the economic development of their country.

Chris Jones, Chief Executive of the City & Guilds Group, commented, “At the City & Guilds Group, we are committed to helping people, organisations and economies across the world develop their skills to support growth.

“This bursary programme is designed to support learners in their skills development journeys, and ultimately contribute to their financial empowerment.

“We know that access to vocational training has a significant and positive impact on economies around the world and is fundamental to closing skills gaps.

“We want to give individuals in Malaysia the opportunity to develop the skills they need to thrive in their careers and help these economies go from strength to strength.”

The bursaries can be used for vocational and leadership courses provided by City & Guilds and ILM across a variety of sectors, including travel, transport, hospitality, health and social care, construction and manufacturing.

Applicants must be

  • 16 or over
  • Currently studying, or seeking to study, a City & Guilds or ILM qualification
  • A resident of the country of study
  • Able to demonstrate that they are in genuine financial need

Bursary applications close on June 18. Prospective applicants can apply here.

Source: https://www.malaymail.com

Kulasegaran: All vocational training centres should be under one ministry to avoid redundancy

Human Resources minister M. Kulasegaran (centre) being briefed by Industrial Training Institute personnel on the air-conditioning course available at the centre. - SAIFUL BAHRI/The Star

Human Resources minister M. Kulasegaran (centre) being briefed by Industrial Training Institute personnel on the air-conditioning course available at the centre. – SAIFUL BAHRI/The Star

IPOH: The Human Resources Ministry will suggest to the Cabinet to standardise and park all the vocational skills training centres under one ministry.

Its Minister M. Kulasegaran said there are many such centres parked under different ministries and he hoped that this can be changed to eliminate redundancy.

“The overlapping must stop, why must there be competition between ministries?” he asked.

“It’s all under one family. I will submit a paper to the Cabinet to standardise it,” he told reporters after visiting the Industrial Training Institute here on Sunday (June 3).

Kulasegaran was commenting on the need for the standardisation, as some skills training centres also come under the Education and Youth and Sports Ministries.

Kulasegaran said such practices started in the 1990s and must be stopped.

“We don’t want competition between ministries.

“We want to compete with the private entrepreneurs and with other countries to be the best in the world. That should be the way,” he said.

Source: www.thestar.com.my

Concern over 30% drop in numbers enrolling in skills training institutes

This will affect government’s plans to develop a skilled workforce, says minister Kulasegaran.

Human Resources Minister M Kulasegaran says financial constraints were believed to be the cause of the declining student enrolment.

SHAH ALAM: Human Resources Minister M Kulasegaran has expressed concern over the 30% drop in student enrolment into various skills training institutes over the past two years.

He said the declining number was alarming as such a scenario would damper the government’s aspiration to make Malaysia a highly-skilled nation if this trend continued to persist.

Kulasegaran said although the country had been having many technical and vocational education training (TVET) colleges, financial constraints were believed to be the cause for the declining student enrolment.

“The drop in student enrolment needs to be looked into thoroughly and I will raise this issue in the Cabinet meeting soon because we want to produce highly-skilled workers and empower them,” he told reporters after opening the Tamil Foundation Malaysia’s annual general meeting here today.

Meanwhile, Kulasegaran said his ministry was now reviewing the current minimum wage policy to give priority to the rights of Malaysians in the employment sector.

He said details of the policy would be announced on Monday.

On the programme today, the Ipoh Barat MP said the government would continue to empower the Indian community, including bringing transformation to the work sector dominated by the ethnic group.

“I was directed by Prime Minister Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad to come out with drafts of various programmes to improve the skills of the Indians and all races in the future.

“There is a special segment for the development of the Indian community mentioned in the Pakatan Harapan manifesto which covers various aspects. We will work on it.

“In fact, the Indian Community Development Blueprint of the previous administration would be examined.

“We will implement (the plan) if it is beneficial for the targeted groups,” he said.

Source: http://www.freemalaysiatoday.com

Taiwan promotes vocational and technical education for overseas compatriot students

Wu Hsin-hsing (吳新興), Chairman of the Overseas Chinese Affairs Committee, pictured above. (By Central News Agency)

TAIPEI (Taiwan News) – To commemorate Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen’s second year in office, chief of the Overseas Community Affairs Council (OCAC) is looking back at the achievements of the education projects made for the overseas compatriot students from the Southeast Asian countries under President Tsai Ing-wen’s New Southbound Policy.

In terms of education, the OCAC has encouraged students to come to Taiwan for training and education. The number of  overseas compatriot students coming to Taiwan has increased from 700+ to more than 1,000, in two years, and the students’ country of origin has also gradually expanded.

In an interview with the Central News Agency (CNA), Wu Hsin-hsing (吳新興), the chairman of OCAC, said that over the past two years, the Taiwanese government has relaxed the number of schools participating in the “3+4 Overseas Compatriot Students’ Technical and Vocational Training Courses,” and has actively enrolled students from Southeast Asian countries, and the results have been remarkable.

The students of the “3+4 Overseas Compatriot Students’ Technical and Vocational Training Courses” come to Taiwan to study in vocational high schools for 3 years. After graduation, they continue their studies for 4 years at technical colleges.

According to OCAC data, in 2016, there were only five participating schools and 754 overseas compatriot students studying in the program. In 2017, there were 12 schools participating with 1034 overseas compatriot students, and this year, the numbers have increased to 13 schools with 1,531 enrolled students.

Not only has the number of overseas compatriot vocational school students increased, but also the number of countries from which they have come. Wu said that a majority have been coming from Vietnam and Malaysia, and now, more students are also coming from Indonesia, Burma, and other countries.

He said that in the future, the OCAC will continue to expand the reach of this program and hope to recruit more Chinese-ethnic students of different nationalities by communicating with overseas compatriot parents and promote the services provided for overseas compatriot students.

Wu pointed out that in addition to the “3+4 Overseas Compatriot Students’ Technical and Vocational Training Courses,” the OCAC also promotes youth technology courses for overseas compatriot students, overseas compatriot graduates and workers, and students who have come to Taiwan to study at two-year technical and vocational programs. The graduation certificate issued by the OCAC helps the overseas compatriots start their own businesses after returning home

According to OCAC data, in 2016, Overseas Youth Vocational Training Classes had 1,179  students distributed among 17 schools and in 2017 the number increased to 1,380 attending 21 schools.

With regard to the advantages of overseas students coming to study in Taiwan, Wu said that quality of vocational senior high schools and higher education in Taiwan is slightly better than Southeast Asian countries, including teachers and equipment.

At the same time, Taiwan and Southeast Asian countries are culturally similar. So the overseas compatriot students are able to integrate quickly into Taiwan’s society, including Taiwan’s freedom and democracy among the advantages.

Wu conveys that the OCAC provides tuition subsidies to overseas students who are studying at Taiwan. Overseas compatriot students can also work part-time up to 20 hours per week, alleviating the financial burdens of studying abroad.

Additionally, the Overseas Credit Guarantee Fund (OCGFund) can provide a loan of NT$80,000 to overseas students who need assistance when they arrive in Taiwan, and then repay them in installments.

In order to attract more overseas compatriots to Taiwan, Wu mentions that the OCAC also discussed with related ministries and councils to relax the conditions under which the overseas compatriot students can remain in Taiwan after graduation.

He said that the draft of the “New Economic Immigration Law” planned by the Cabinet includes this modification. Those who graduate from vocational high school and receive their certification will be able to stay in Taiwan to look for a job, which will help increase Taiwan’s middle-level technical manpower.

SourceL https://www.taiwannews.com.tw

Tawaran Istimewa: 50% Yuran kursus* Induksi PPL (19-20 Mei)

Salam kemahiran, sempena pembentukan kerajaan baru serta harapan baru untuk rakyat, I Smart Educare juga nak raikan dengan menawarkan 50% rebat (RM180 setelah rebat) untuk anda jika anda menyertai serta bawa seorang rakan lagi (TERHAD kepada seorang kawan shj) untuk menyertai kursus induksi PPL ni minggu depan (19-20 Mei).
Tawaran ini cuma terhad kepada 5×2=10 peserta sahaja.

INI KALI LAH SAHAJA
Malaysia dah cipta sejarah, I Smart Educare juga nak cipta sejarah dengan penawaran istimewa ini 🙂 

PPL
Kepong: 19-20 Mei 18
Masa: 8.30-5pm
Yuran: RM360 – Maybank 514589385943, ISE Education Sdn Bhd

(termasuk nota, sijil dari JPK & PALING PENTING, tips peperiksaan)


DAFTAR SEKARANG!

Jika berminat, boleh muat turun borang Borang Permohonan KIP-01 dan emel kembali ke ismarteducare@gmail.com beserta dengan slip bayaran.

T&C sepintas lalu
1. Ini Kali Sahaja
2. Anda perlu menyertai kursus ini, anda bayar RM180 tapi kawan bayar RM360
3. Terhad kepada rebat 50% untuk yuran kursus anda, tak kira berapa ramai kawan yg diajak
4. Kawan tidak pernah mengikuti mana-mana kursus induksi dengan I Smart Educare sebelum ni.

Malaysia has what it takes to attract MNC investments: GE Malaysia CEO

SUNPIX/ADIB RAWI

KUALA LUMPUR: Malaysia has all the key ingredients to attract multinational companies (MNCs) to invest here but more could be done in terms of providing skilled labour, said General Electric (GE) Malaysia CEO Datuk Mark Rozario (pix).

“Talent, particularly new graduates, that’s probably one area that could improve but that’s not unique to Malaysia. If you think about university education, what’s lacking are things like critical thinking. The kind of skills that are required by industries are normally never fulfilled by just doing a university course.

“But the government is doing a lot in that area as well, they’ve got things like TVET (Technical and Vocational Education and Training), vocational training, internships; so continue doing that. The other thing that probably needs to be done is for the country to move away from the reliance of cheap labour, which the government is also doing,” he told SunBiz in an interview.

Rozario was one of the speakers at the recent 2018 APCAC Business Summit, which was hosted by the American Malaysian Chamber of Commerce. Themed “Charting a Bold Future: US Businesses in the Asian Century”, the event shed light on US investments in Malaysia and the region.

For GE, which has been here since 1975, the environment in Malaysia is very conducive and all its key businesses, namely, aviation, power, oil and gas and healthcare, are present here today.

“We have invested in things like iCentre (monitoring and diagnostics centre) that we described just now, which is the only one in Asia Pacific for GE; one for the oil and gas industry and the other for power. The one for oil and gas is a global centre and is one of three centres, with the other two in Florence, Italy, and Houston, US. The centres operate in eight-hour shifts,” said Rozario.

He said the reason iCentre is sited in Malaysia is because of the infrastructure that is available here, such as broadband with good coverage and skilled labour, while cost of talent is competitive compared with the rest of the region.

“When you talk about Industry 4.0, one of the first jobs that would go are those semi-skilled jobs. Here in GE, we don’t have any requirement for unskilled labour. All our employees here have to be quite highly skilled.”

According to him, GE’s aircraft engine workshop in Subang employs 300 staff, all of whom are Malaysians. He said the facility, which is a global business servicing more than 40 airlines, used to have expatriate staff but with the transfer of technology and skills over the years, it now has 100% Malaysian staff.

The facility overhauls jet engines and is the only facility outside the US with the capability for GE’s latest LEAP jet engines, which is for the Airbus A320neo and the Boeing 737 MAX.

“Again, why is it sited here? Because we have the infrastructure, the logistics ability for the engines to be sent here by cargo. The engines are taken off the aircraft and flown over to the workshop. We have the logistics, we have the availability of talent. I think the environment here is very conducive for multinationals to have their operations here,” he added.

GE’s main businesses in Malaysia are aviation, power, oil and gas, and healthcare.

Source: http://www.thesundaily.my