Category Archives: Local News

Rosy future for mobile eSports

GAMING is a beloved pastime for many today. It’s entertaining and engaging as compared with watching television or listening to the radio.

A subset of gaming that has taken the world by storm is eSports. It is still gaming except that it’s hardcore competitive in nature. We have seen eSports grow into a global phenomenon but it doesn’t end there. It is expected to become even bigger in 2018, and here’s why.

RISE OF MOBILE ESPORTS
One of the key factors that is pushing the eSports scene in Malaysia and the rest of the world is Mobile eSports. Typically, the eSports scene will focus on games such as DotA 2, League of Legends and Fifa, but with smartphones becoming more and more powerful, it allows for more complex games to be played on the device.

In fact, we saw a number of mobile eSports tournaments last year such as the Mobile Legends Southeast Asia Cup at Tropicana City Mall, Petaling Jaya with a prize pool of US$10,000 (RM40,000), Season 3 of Vainglory Malaysia League at Cyberjaya, and the Garena Arena of Valor tournament in Kuala Lumpur with a prize pool of RM70,000.

It is true that Mobile eSports has still not cemented its place in the scene but it is the most accessible game to the masses since it just involves the use of a smartphone.

According to former MBT Talon eSports player Keegan “Keegs” Tan, “eSports will definitely grow this year since eSports-oriented games are getting more and more accessible with the advent of mobile games. It acts as a gateway to expose people to eSports.”

With Mobile eSports expected to move forward, it’s not hard to see why this will be a major driving force for the success of the local eSports scene.

GAME-BASED EDUCATION
Another factor contributing to the success of eSports in Malaysia is the establishment of a few eSports and gaming-based education programmes. The first is the year-long Riot Games Student Ambassador Program which is available in 28 universities across Malaysia.

Students work to nurture the growth of League of Legends communities in their respective campuses via tournaments and community events. They will be given a healthy budget to manage that.

Then there’s the Garena Student Alliance programme that aims to empower student gamers to build a thriving gaming community and eSports scene in their respective campuses. It is very similar in nature to the Riot Games programme, and both aim to equip students with real-world skills such as Public Relations and Events Management while exposing them to real world eSports scenarios.

There’s also the Johor-based Academy of eSports. At the moment, two vocational certificate programmes are offered; Professional eSports Athlete and eSports Events Management. Not only will you be educated and trained by experienced eSports professionals, you are also given a certificate at the end of the stint to prove your competency and give yourself a career boost.

BIG MONEY
It is no secret that eSports has the potential to bring in lots of revenue. At Level UP KL 2017, vice president of Malaysia Digital Economy Corp’s Creative Content and Technologies, Hasnul Hadi Samsudin, said Malaysia has recorded earnings of RM1.2 billion in games export alone. This number is expected to increase in the coming years.

Coming from their efforts in the Malaysian eSports scene as of last year, Garena’s partnership manager, Fern Yeap, said: “In Malaysia, there is growing support from commercial brands, the media and government as well as the community. The collaboration between all stakeholders increases exposure and awareness, which in turn expands resources and legitimacy for the local scene.”

She added that Southeast Asia’s current title as the fastest growing region for eSports gives it more opportunities for local eSports to scale both regionally and internationally. “Consultants and industry experts are predicting eSports’ continuous growth for the years to come.” said Yeap.

In simpler terms, there has been an increase in support for eSports which in turn brings in more revenue. This inadvertently will turn eSports into a bigger phenomenon.

SOLIDIFIED PRESENCE
Despite how big it has become, eSports is still largely a growing industry in Malaysia. Stakeholders like MDEC has been pushing for the growth of local eSports industry to put Malaysia as the regional games hub of Southeast Asia under the #MYGAMEON initiative.

In December last year, Youth and Sports Minister Khairy Jamaluddin announced that the National Sports Council will form a special unit to promote the eSports arena in Malaysia. “A new unit at MSN will be set up to look at eSports as it will be featured at the 2022 Asian Games. eSports has already been recognised as a sport by The Olympic Council of Asia and we cannot be left behind in training our athletes,” said Khairy.

While not much is known about the formation of the eSports unit, it will definitely be a game changer as far as eSports is concerned.

Professional gamer Ashley “Vause” Foo from the M8 Tempest eSports team feels that the formation of the eSports unit will “help in changing public perception of eSports.

“ It will promote healthy gaming habits, such as eSports centres closing by midnight, which is currently being practised by The Pantheon eSports Centre, which will then increase society’s acceptance, and eventually, turn Malaysia into a major eSports tourist destination.”

CONCLUSION
With commitments shown by the major stakeholders including government agencies, we can expect eSports to grow bigger. We also have a diverse talent pool that is competitive enough in the global stage, to do the country proud.

In fact, Malaysia created history at DotA 2 – The International 2017 when a team was placed third at the event, earning more than US$2.6 million prize money. That is a testament to how capable we are in the eSports scene.

With growing popularity and booming revenue potential, it’s game on for the local eSports industry.

Source: https://www.nst.com.my/lifestyle/bots/2018/01/322931/rosy-future-mobile-esports
By Aiman Maulana
 – 

Comment: There is an effort to develop eSports NOSS, so for those who are in the industry who plan to set up an academy and offer a nationally recognised certificate (SKM) in eSports, be prepared for it.

21 disadvantaged girls graduate from cosmetics company’s course

(Standing, from left) NCOW co-chairmann Datuk Ramani Gurusamy, L'Oreal Malaysia senior corporate communications executive Susan Koh, YWCA president Joanne Yeoh, VTOC chairman June Yeoh (standing, second from right) and Loh (standing right) with the graduates.

(Standing, from left) NCOW co-chairmann Datuk Ramani Gurusamy, L’Oreal Malaysia senior corporate communications executive Susan Koh, YWCA president Joanne Yeoh, VTOC chairman June Yeoh (standing, second from right) and Loh (standing right) with the graduates.

Twenty-one Malaysian women from underprivileged backgrounds are now certified hairdressers and make-up artists, after completing the 12-month L’Oreal Malaysia’s Beauty For A Better Life programme.

They graduated at a lively ceremony held at the Vocational Training Opportunity Center (VTOC), witnessed by their proud instructors and family members.

At the event, the graduating class of 2017 put together a graduation hair and makeup show, showcasing their skills by presenting three different looks – Glamour, Romantic and Rock.

The L’Oreal Foundation launched Beauty For A Better Life worldwide, extending a helping hand to young, disadvantaged women in more than 20 countries from Latin America, Asia and the Middle East, Africa and Europe.

Ten women successfully graduated from the programme last year, and three of them secured a job at Centro Hair Salon in The Gardens Mall, Kuala Lumpur, immediately after completing the training.

This year, L’Oreal Malaysia expanded the programme to include a new category, Beauty Care to give participants skills and knowledge required for the make-up industry.

The programme encompasses six months of comprehensive training that includes courses on makeup, bridal and nails.

Graduates of the programme also get the chance to intern at leading cosmetic stores such as Shu Uemura, Urban Decay and YSL Beauty, allowing them to gain first-hand experience.

L’Oréal Malaysia corporate communications director Jean Loh said, “Last year, we had 12 girls who graduated as certified hairdressers through Beauty For A Better Life.

“This year, with the introduction of the Beauty Care programme, we are immensely proud to see 21 young women graduates.

“In line with our company’s credo, L’Oreal Malaysia believes that regardless of their background or financial ability, these girls should be given equal opportunity to obtain the skills and tools needed to integrate themselves into society.

“By helping them achieve the first step of acquiring knowledge, we can give back to the community and encourage these ambitious young women to make a difference in their own lives,” said Loh.

The L’Oreal Malaysia’s Beauty For A Better Life programme was made possible through a partnership with the National Council of Women’s Organization (NCWO) and the VTOC by YWCA.

As a leading advocate of women’s rights, NCWO unites women’s organisations to respect, protect and fulfil human rights, promote the development and advancement of women at all levels, advocate and monitor the full participation, inclusion and representation of all women in decision-making, as well as ensure equitable access for women as agents and beneficiaries in national development.

VTOC, a project of YWCA Kuala Lumpur, provides vocational training for employment to young women and girls from economically-disadvantaged segments of Malaysian society.

Since its inception in 1998, a total of 1,524 young women have benefited from its courses.

Read more at https://www.thestar.com.my/metro/metro-news

Lack of information hampers vocational training push

Vocational schools provide youths opportunities to acquire skills, such as hair styling and also small business opportunities. — Bernama picVocational schools provide youths opportunities to acquire skills, such as hair styling and also small business opportunities. — Bernama pic

IPOH, Nov 25 — Lack of information and inadequate career guidance have contributed to the decline of non-academically inclined secondary students taking up vocational courses.

Most said they were unaware of Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) after completing their Form Three.

Kalaiarasan Pandian, 19, from Kampar, said he wasn’t aware of TVET programmes when he chose to stop schooling after Form Three.

“I was not aware of TVET courses and even my teachers did not suggest I take up vocational training.

“They only persuaded me to complete my studies until Form Five,” he told Malay Mail recently.

He also said he did not know where the TVET institutions were, and this hampered the process of applying for courses offered.

Kalaiarasan, now employed as a motorcycle mechanic, said he quit studying as his academic results were not up to mark and his parents could not provide financial support to further his studies.

On Monday, Deputy Education Minister Datuk P. Kamalanathan said only seven per cent of students across the country took up TVET after Form Three.

He also said the ministry took various steps to increase rural students’ enrolment in vocational colleges.

The measures were gaining popularity following broadcasts over radio channels, newspaper advertisements and collaboration with non-governmental organisations.

Teenager, Veenod Nathan,18, from Pusing, Perak, said he did not know about the TVET programme as there wasn’t much promotion on it.

“I’m not aware of  TVET courses and the vocational schools that I know are from my home.

“I quit school two years ago as I wasn’t performing well in studies and at the same time my father met with a bad accident.

“He could not go to work and I have to support my family by working,” he said.

Veenod who is working as a labourer in a warehouse said students who fared poorly in their studies might go for vocational courses if proper guidance were given to them.

Khoo See Nee, 28, who is also a school drop-out, lamented that vocational training such as TVET was not available during her schooling days.

“If I had this option back then, I would definitely have taken up vocational training,” she said.

Khoo said she did not pursue any other vocational education after coming out of school as her guardians could not support her.

Another dropout, who wished to be only known as Derrick, said he felt he had no purpose in life after gaining his SPM last year.

“I did not know what to do and I ended doing various jobs merely to pass time,” the 19-year-old said.

A relative then introduced Derrick to vocational studies.

Currently undergoing training to repair air conditioners and refrigerators in Kuala Lumpur, Derrick took a loan from Kojadi to subsidise the RM20,000 needed for the course.

Meanwhile, MCA Youth vocational education bureau committee member Jimmy Loh blamed parents and students for the lack of interest in vocational training.

“Parents prefer their children to follow the traditional path which can land them a degree but they are not aware that you can also earn a degree from vocational courses,” he said.

Students, he said, were not bothered to seek out information about vocational courses.

Source: http://www.themalaymailonline.com

 

Comments:

Well, not sure whether the students are internet savvy or not, if they are, hope they are able to see this article & here’s the directory of all the JPK Accredited Centres offering TVET programs in Malaysia, private & public.

As for funding, besides Kojadi (refer below), there are other avenues like
1) PTPK (Perbadanan Tabung Pembangunan Kemahiran),
2) SOCSO (children with parents that is)
a) Pencen ilat for contributors that is permanently disabled
b) Pencen penakat for widows
3) Respective state education funds


KOJADI

INTEREST CHARGES

  • Interest will be charged to the applicant’s loan account immediately after the disbursement of the loan.
  • The interest rate for the loan will be as follows :

For existing member of KOJADI with minumum 5 years membership:

1st year (Upon First release of loan) – 5.8% (on a monthly rest and reducing balance basis)

2nd year onwards until full settlement – 6.8% (on a monthly rest and reducing blance basis)

5.8% ~ 6.8% equivalent to 4.5% flat rate

For new member:

1st year (Upon First release of loan) – 6.8% (on a monthly rest and reducing balance basis)

2nd year onwards until full settlement – 7.8% (on a monthly rest and reducing blance basis)

6.8% ~ 7.8% equivalent to 5.8% flat rate

SERVICE OF LOAN INTEREST

Under specified circumstances, loan borrower is required to service loan interest during study period. The monthly interest is between RM100-RM300 depending on the loan amount applied for based the following table :-

Loan Amount Yes No
Below RM25,000 O
RM30,000 O (Course duration > 2 years) O (Course duration < 2 years)
Above RM35,000 O

REPAYMENT OF LOAN

The founding objective of KOJADI is to pool the resources among its members for mutual benefits. Prompt repayment of the loan will enable KOJADI to give similar financial aid to other members for further study.

The repayment of the loan will begin three (3) or six (6) months after graduation and the maximum repayment period shall not exceed 8 years.Depending on the amount of loan and the type of the loan, repayment will be as follows:
  • 1st year – RM200 or RM300 per month
  • 2nd year – RM300 or RM400 per month
  • 3rd year – RM400 or RM500 & above perm onth until full settlement
  • OR equal monthly instalments until full settlement.

FURTHER INFORMATION

The above particulars are subject to change. For further information, please call at out office at

Koperasi Jayadiri Malaysia Berhad (KOJADI)
11th Floor, Wisma MCA,
163 Jalan Ampang,
50450 Kuala Lumpur. Road Map
Tel : 03 – 2161 6499 (Membership and Loan Department)
Fax : 03 – 2162 1413

E-mail :
For Membership related enquiries : member@kojadi.com.my
For Education Loan application related enquiries : loan@kojadi.com.my

 

Ever-expanding roles, responsibilities of MOHR

Riot believes that his ministry has provided a holistic solution to the skilling, upskilling and reskilling of the nation’s workforce.

KUCHING: It comes as no surprise that the Ministry of Human Resources (MOHR) holds many duties under its purview, being the authority in charge of the Malaysian workforce.

The ministry is responsible for skills development, labour, occupational safety and health, trade unions, industrial relations, industrial court, labour market analysis and social security — to name a few — and these responsibilities continue to grow with each new facet introduced, as roles of human resources evolve with time and technology.

Take, for example, the boom of the ‘gig’ economy over the past two years triggering new income-generating trends such as Uber and Airbnb — leading MOHR to come up with new ways to protect the interests of employees in a whole new light.

First formed in 1904 as the Labour Department, it has changed its name six times over the past 114 years, riding on the massive changes in the nation’s industrial landscape and labour forces.

 

Now, MOHR oversees ten federal departments and four federal agencies:

FEDERAL DEPARTMENTS

1. Department of Labour of Peninsular Malaysia (JTKSM)

2. Department of Labour Sarawak

3. Department of Labour Sabah

4. Department of Skills Development (DSD)

5. Manpower Department (JTM)

6. Department of Occupational Safety and Health (Dosh)

7. Department of Industrial Relations Malaysia

8. Department of Trade Union Affairs (JHEKS)

9. Industrial Court of Malaysia

10. Institut of Labour Market Information and Analysis (ILMIA)

FEDERAL AGENCIES

1. Social Security Organisation (SOCSO)

2. Human Resources Development Fund (HRDF)

3. National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)

4. Skills Development Fund Corporation (PTPK)

 

The present minister, Dato Sri (Dr) Richard Riot Jaem — who was sworn in on May 16, 2013 — attributes his success to the holistic approach that he has incorporated in dealing with his ministry’s day-to-day operations and its long-term schemes implemented for the welfare and upskilling of the nation’s labour force.

In an exclusive interview with The Borneo Post, Riot admits that his role as the Minister of Human Resources has been a learning experience in itself.

“To be very frank, when I first came into the ministry, I thought it was only going to deal with labour issues.

Only after coming in did I realise the huge responsibility I had on my shoulders.

It was really going to be a tough job,” he shares.

From looking after the interests and welfare of employees in Peninsular Malaysia, Sarawak and Sabah, to ensuring adequate training and development of the country’s future workforce, the MOHR is involved with anything and everything to do with the affairs of the Malaysian workers.

Following the goals set out under the 11th Malaysia Plan (11MP), Riot aims to build a world-class workforce through steady increases in the percentage of skilled workers up to 35 per cent by 2020.

Today, employers and employees nationwide stand to gain from these numerous programmes and plans being put in place.

Employers can utilise MOHR’s skill development facilities and schemes provided to upskill or reskill their employees, allowing them to enhance their human capital and drive innovation from within.

Meanwhile, SPM holders who have no plans to pursue academically oriented tertiary education are encouraged for technical schools to gain better employment prospects, while high-skilled diasporas are slowly but surely being wooed back home to take on the high-skilled roles that need to be filled urgently.

All of this has contributed greatly to the expansion of the Malaysian economy and society as a whole, helping MOHR bring to life the government’s vision of having a competent and skilled workforce.

Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Tun Razak (second left) visits the exhibition held in connection with the launch of TVET Malaysia at Adtec Shah Alam. On the prime minister’s left is Riot. — Bernama photo

 Skilling, upskilling and reskilling

To achieve this task, Riot says he and his ministry has been focusing on skilling, upskilling and reskilling the labour force through various schemes and programmes that are being made available by the different departments and agencies to the wider public.

Most notably, the skilling of youths is regarded as one of the most vital functions of the MOHR as it ensures the future survivability of industries by providing them with an adequate workforce.

“I always encourage graduates from our Malaysia Skills Certificate (MSC) Level 3 Programmes to re-enrol to MSC Level 4, in order to pursue our diploma courses to continue gaining skills as it will greatly increase their livelihood down the line,” Riot shares.

For SPM School-Leavers with no plans to pursue academically oriented tertiary education, the ministry encourages them — via awareness campaigns — to enrol into one of its 32 technical institutes across the country.

Of the 32, 24 provide various technical and vocational education and training (TVET) certificate courses to the public, with eight having diploma programmes for certificate-holders.

Besides increasing the number of certificate and diploma holders, Riot stresses that the quality of graduates is equally crucial.

“We need to produce a labour force that is equipped with the right knowledge, skills and attitude to thrive in the globalised economy where emerging new technology, digitalisation and ‘Industry 4.0’ have drastically changed what is needed for the average worker.

“Because of this, we have introduced new syllabuses to ensure that our workforce would be able to meet the needs and standards of our changing industries.”

These efforts have been fruitful, discloses Riot, as revealed by the high employability percentage reported for graduates from Miri’s Industrial Training Institute (ILP) and Shah Alam’s Advance Technology Training Centre (Adtec).

“I’m very happy to say the employability rates amongst our graduates are 92 per cent — 92 per cent (of the graduates) showcasing exactly how important TVET skills are to workers nowadays,” he says.

Adding to this, the MOHR has been pushing hard especially for youths to embrace technical courses, as it is anticipated that 60 per cent of our industries would require employees who are technically skilled in the near future.

 Focus on current workforce

With much focus being placed on youths, it appears that many members of the workforce are unable to participate due to prior financial obligations.

To address this, MOHR makes available several programmes to accommodate those currently working — some under the HRDF, and one under the DSD.

The schemes under HRDF are tailored for employees already in the workforce who are looking to upskill or reskill themselves in order to increase their career prospects.

Employers may actively participate in many of HRDF’s programmes by sending their workers for further training.

Besides that, the DSD also provides a programme called the ‘National Dual Training’, which pairs up citizens with paid apprenticeships at selected companies where they may receive offers of employment after graduating from the programme.

This programmes focuses on 30 per cent classroom learning and 70 per cent on-thejob learning, to ensure that the graduates would be able to adapt to their new jobs with ease upon completion of the course.

The skilling of youths is regarded as one of the most vital functions of the MOHR as it ensures the future survivability of industries by providing them with an adequate workforce. — Bernama photo

 Recognising prior experience learning

Riot also recognises that not all workers need further training as they may have already obtained the appropriate experience from long years on the job.

Still, they may lack the formal credentials to justify their skills.

“A lot of people in Malaysia — including Sarawak — are already very skilful with their hands, but they lack the paper accreditation that acts as proof of their skills to employers.

“A worker may be a very good carpenter or welder but because he doesn’t have formal credentials, upon seeking employment he may find that his pay is much lower than what he should be receiving because he is regarded as an unskilled labour,” Riot explains.

Understanding that this would deny a significant part of the local workforce from appropriate wages and bright career paths, Riot discloses that his ministry alongside with the Defence Ministry launched a recognition of prior experiential learning on Feb 22 this year, to help anyone with prior experience or skills from a variety of industries to officially obtain diplomas certifying their abilities.

Each applicant would be assessed in terms of their skills and competency to see if they qualify for the diploma accreditation.

According to Riot, so far more than 1,000 people have registered for the scheme, with 300 due to graduate with diplomas by the end of this year.

“While this scheme is mostly geared towards former Armed Forces personnel, I would like to stress that it is open to those who seek to upgrade themselves for better job prospects and better recognition of their skills and abilities.

“As far as Armed Forces go, they register with Perhebat (Armed Forces Ex-Servicemen Affairs Corporation), but the civilians can either register with the HRDF, or directly with the ministry (MOHR).

” Overall, Riot believes that his ministry has provided a holistic solution to the skilling, upskilling and reskilling of the nation’s workforce.

He adds that while there has been some concern on whether or not Malaysia would be able to meet the goal of 35 per cent skilled workers by 2020, he is confident that the target remains achievable.

“We have about two years to go before reaching 2020 — I am very confident that the 35 per cent target as required by the government can be achieved.

“In order to do so, I would like to especially promote the ministry to Sarawak as I believe there is still a lack of awareness and misconception of what MOHR actually does.

“I believe Sarawakians are still not fully aware of these benefits and opportunities they can obtain from MOHR,” he points out.

Riot looking at the interview registration prosses at the Job Fair organised by the Ministry of Human Resources at UTC Kuching on May 20, 2017.

Source: http://www.theborneopost.com/

Only 7% go for technical, vocational skills after Form Three

KUALA LUMPUR, Nov 20 — Only 7 per cent of students across the country take up Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) after their Form Three.

Deputy Education Minister, Datuk P. Kamalanathan said various efforts had been implemented to increase the entry of students into TVET institutions and vocational colleges, besides giving them exposure on career prospects after graduating from the vocational colleges.

“The Education Ministry has been transforming the TVET since 2012 to uplift the status of this stream as a premier stream to help realise the government’s aspiration of meeting the country’s need for skilled workers by 2020,” he said in reply to a question from Nurul Izzah Anwar (PKR-Lembah Pantai) in the Dewan Rakyat, here, today.

To a supplementary question from Dr Mansor Abd Rahman (BN-Sik) on the ministry’s strategies to increase rural students’ enrolment into the vocational colleges, Kamalanathan said the measures included making publicity broadcasts via the radio channels, newspaper advertisements and collaboration with non-governmental organisations.

He said online applications for entry into the TVET institutions for the 2018 session had been opened and many applications had been received thus far.

Besides the Education Ministry, six other ministries involved in implementing the TVET are the Human Resources; Higher Education; Works; Youth and Sports; Rural and Regional Development; and Agriculture and Agro-based Industry ministries.

Source: Bernama

TVET getting more popular, says Human Resources Minister

Human Resources Minister Datuk Richard Riot Jaem (centre) presenting a scroll to one of the graduates at the National Dual Training System’s 3rd Convocation Ceremony at Panggung Budaya of the Sarawak Cultural Village. Pix by Goh Pei Pei

Human Resources Minister Datuk Richard Riot Jaem said TVET used to be a second option for those who did not excel academically.

“However, in the past four to five years, we noticed that students who did well academically also enrolled in TVET institutions.

“This show that there the government’s efforts, in raising awareness on the importance and potential of TVET, have worked out positively,” he said.

“Malaysia plans to have 35 per cent of skilled workforce by 2020 in order to achieve a high income nation status.

“I am confident that we can reach our target because our skilled workforce has increased from 28 per cent (in 2015) to 31 per cent this year,” he said.

Many developed countries, Richard said, also emphasised on TVET.

For instances, more then 50 per cent of the workforce in Singapore are skilled workers, he pointed out.

Speaking at the National Dual Training System’s 3rd Convocation Ceremony here, he said academic success is still relevant but there is also a need to have a workforce that is equipped with skills and technical knowledge.

He said an allocation of RM4.9 billion for TVET institutions in the 2018 Budget showed the government’s commitment towards the vision.

“I can assure you that if you are a graduate of TVET, you will have a bright future as the country needs you,” he added.

A total 173 students received their scroll at the ceremony today, having attended various courses including food preparation and presentation, homestay operation, traditional music and dancing performances and audio production.

Source: By Goh Pei Pei – 

Education Ministry: No racial quota for entry to vocational colleges

Deputy Education Minister Datuk Chong Sin Woon said the government was building more vocational colleges to provide more places for students interested in taking up technical and vocational courses. — Saw Siong FengDeputy Education Minister Datuk Chong Sin Woon said the government was building more vocational colleges to provide more places for students interested in taking up technical and vocational courses. — Saw Siong Feng

KUALA LUMPUR, Nov 1 — The Education Ministry said today it had not set any racial quota for intake of students into vocational colleges.

Deputy Education Minister Datuk Chong Sin Woon said the government was building more vocational colleges to provide more places for students interested in taking up technical and vocational courses.

He said that since the Vocational Education Transformation Plan was introduced in 2012, some 81 vocational colleges went into operation throughout the country and five more were under construction.

“The provision of new places for vocational training does not depend on racial quota as it is open to all students who want to acquire the skills,” he said during Question Time in the Dewan Rakyat.

He was replying to a supplementary question from M. Kulasegaran (DAP-Ipoh Barat) who wanted to know the efforts of the government in assisting minority groups such as the Indian community to obtain places in vocational colleges.

When replying to the original question from Kulasegaran on the number of students who succeeded in obtaining the Sijil Kemahiran Malaysia (Malaysia Skills Certificate), Chong said that to date, 2,273 graduates in the 2016 first cohort from 15 vocational colleges received the Vocational College Diplomas.

He said 12,997 graduates in the second cohort obtained similar diplomas in August this year.

“A total of 90.58 per cent of the 2,273 first cohort graduates had gained employment while 55.49 per cent of the 12,997 students in the second cohort were offered jobs even before completing their studies,” he said. — Bernama

Comment: It’s the awareness & perhaps language & culture barrier that limits the number of non Malay students in these vocational colleges (basically any public institutions). Therefore, it’s very important that non Malay students have a better command of the Malay language and this must start from primary schools, otherwise they would shun these public institutions.

2018 Budget: TVET Malaysia Master Plan unveiled, RM4.9bil allocated

All Technical and Vocational Education Training institutions previously under seven ministries will be rebranded as TVET Malaysia and placed under the Human Resources Ministry.

KUALA LUMPUR: All Technical and Vocational Education Training institutions previously under seven ministries will be rebranded as TVET Malaysia and placed under the Human Resources Ministry.

Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Razak said today that RM4.9 billion will also be allocated to implement the TVET Malaysia Master Plan.

“To encourage TVET graduates to continue their studies, the government has prepared 100 TVET Excellent Students Scholarships worth RM4.5 million,” he added.

The government will also create the National Rail Centre of Excellence in a bid to support skilled workers in the rail industry.

The centre, he said, will supervise and coordinate quality assurance, as well as national rail education and training accreditation.

Najib also said Malaysia Rail Link Sdn Bhd, in cooperation with higher education institutions, will train 3,000 professionals in the industry.

Source: NST Online

Comment: It’s good that finally efforts can be streamlined. Hopefully the Ministry of Human Resources, especially the Department of Skills Development, has the extra capacity in terms of manpower & budget to execute policies well.

Free higher education for all, Pakatan pledges in alternative budget

Pakatan Harapan said free education is imperative to address a lack of critical thinking skills desired by employers among graduates hunting for jobs. — Picture by Choo Choy MayPakatan Harapan said free education is imperative to address a lack of critical thinking skills desired by employers among graduates hunting for jobs. — Picture by Choo Choy MayKUALA LUMPUR, October 25 — Tertiary education will be free to everyone within 10 years if the Pakatan Harapan (PH) pact succeeds in taking control of Putrajaya in the next elections.

The federal Opposition pact made the pledge in its alternative Budget 2018 today, saying such a policy was possibly as it would conduct “a full audit and study on cost, wastage and corruption factors in all public universities”.

“Pakatan Harapan believes in free public education for all. The provision of free public university education is an ideal that we must achieve within 10 years of taking over government.

“Further, we need to help our graduates increase their employability and wages. To do this, Pakatan Harapan will place greater emphasis on Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET),” it said.

The Opposition alliance of PKR, DAP, Parti Amanah Negara and Parti Pribumi Bersatu Malaysia said free education is imperative to address a lack of critical thinking skills desired by employers among graduates hunting for jobs.

PH also said it would also expand the Penang government’s German Dual Vocational Training (GDVT), launched in 2015, into a nationwide programme.

It said that while the ruling Barisan Nasional administration’s Education Blueprint has identified TVET as a priority area, there are few resources for apprentice programmes.

“Under this programme, host companies are given funding to conduct on-the-job training for selected TVET students who can then go on to obtain jobs in the same companies or the same sector,” it added.

Source: Malaymailonline

Comment: Much that I laud PH’s pledge in its alternative Budget 2018 for free higher education in 10 years time should they come into power but saying that there are limited resources for apprentice programmes are not true. The government has allocated & spent quite a lot (I don’t have the figure but I can feel it as an industry player) to implement the National Dual Training System (NDTS) via the Department of Skills Development, Ministry of Human Resources. Nevertheless, it could have been better if leakages/corruption were to be minimized.

So, what’s NDTS & why NDTS? Well, that deserve another post 🙂

Program PVMA bantu selesai isu pelajar tercicir

SHAH ALAM – Pandangan Menteri Pembangunan Wanita, Keluarga dan Masyarakat (KPWKM), Datuk Seri Rohani Abdul Karim terhadap isu pelajar tercicir atau pelajar bermasalah boleh diselesaikan dengan cara yang lebih baik.

Sebaliknya menurut Pengerusi Jawatankuasa Bertindak ILKS Bumiputera, Nordin Abdul Malek, masalah pelajar tercicir mungkin dapat diatasi dengan kelas pemulihan atau kelas kemahiran di sekolah.

“Pihak kami menghormati pandangan banyak pihak terhadap isu ini. Bagaimanapun saya lihat tidak ada penyelesaian terbaik yang disuarakan oleh kerajaan.

“Pada pandangan kami, isu pelajar tercicir sepatutnya sudah ada penyelesaian.Pelajar yang bermasalah atau tidak minat untuk mengikuti  kelas kemahiran, yang mana ia diisi dengan aktiviti yang boleh membimbing semula mereka,” katanya kepada Sinar Online, hari ini.

Menurut beliau, kerajaan sepatutnya bekerjasama dengan pengusaha pusat latihan kemahiran bumiputera yang menguruskan Program Pendidikan Vokasional Menengah Atas (PVMA) untuk menyelesaikan isu tersebut.

“Kami berpengalaman lebih 20 tahun untuk menguruskan pelajar seperti ini dan kami mengambil pelajar mengikuti program kemahiran seawal tingkatan empat.

“Kami tawarkan kepada remaja atau pelajar yang kebanyakannya tidak berminat untuk mengikuti pembelajaran akademik,” jelasnya.

Kelmarin, Kementerian KPWKM  mencadangkan hukuman buang sekolah digantikan dengan kelas pemulihan atau peralihan untuk pelajar bermasalah yang diisi dengan aktiviti yang boleh membimbing semula mereka.

Rohani menyarankan Kementerian Pendidikan menimbang  semula hukuman buang sekolah itu memandangkan kebanyakan pelajar yang dibuang sekolah lebih terdedah untuk bergaul dengan golongan yang salah dan terlibat dengan jenayah.

[ARTIKEL BERKAITAN: Kaji semula hukuman buang sekolah]

Menurutnya lagi, program itu mampu meringankan bebanan guru dalam mengawal selia pelajar di sekolah.

“Setiap sekolah ada kelompok yang dianggap berisiko tinggi yang tidak berminat untuk meneruskan sesi pembelajaran. Mereka mempunyai sikap yang mengganggu keharmonian sekolah.

“Beban guru sudah terlalu tinggi. Mereka perlu fokus kepada pelajar yang mahu meneruskan pengajian dan dalam masa sama mereka perlu menumpukan perhatian kepada kelompok pelajar berisiko tinggi ini,” ujarnya lagi.

Sehubungan itu, beliau mencadangkan satu jawatan kuasa ditubuhkan kementerian bagi menangani masalah tersebut.

“Saya cadangkan tubuhkan task force dan jemput kami sebagai ahli jawatan kuasa memandangkan kami mempunyai pengalaman lebih 20 tahun dalam menguruskan kelompok pelajar tercicir,” katanya lagi.

Sumber: Sinar Harian

Ulasan: Pelajar PVMA lazimnya tiada 5 kredit, jadi, boleh mohon sambung belajar di pusat latihan kemahiran di Pusat Bertauliah JPK, boleh cari di sini