Tag Archives: Education Minister

TVET, a stepchild no more

Students of Politeknik Ungku Omar get hands on training on automotive engineering at the workshop at their campus in Ipoh.

Students of Politeknik Ungku Omar get hands on training on automotive engineering at the workshop at their campus in Ipoh.

A framework has been proposed to address the long-standing problems of our TVET system

A NEW framework for technical and vocational training is in the pipelines.

If approved, the proposal will see a more streamlined, effective, and industry-relevant, Technical and Vocational Education Training (TVET) system.

Proposed by the National TVET Movement to the Economic Planning Unit last month, the framework aims to address the country’s ailing TVET system.

“Our focus is on upper secondary school students. We want to create a TVET champion.

TVET students being trained to be industry-ready. — File photo

TVET students being trained to be industry-ready. — File photo

“We want students to have better access to choices between academics and something more hands-on like TVET. This is what’s happening in other countries,” said Ahmad Tajudin, who recently retired as the Education Ministry deputy director-general.

Among those part of the Movement are the Federation of Human Resources Ministry’s Department of Skills Development (JPK) Accredited Centres (FeMac), National Council of Professors, and the National Parent-Teacher Associations’ Vocational and Technical Consultative Council.

For too long, TVET has been the “troubled stepchild” of the education system, he said.

This framework tackles long-standing problems like the:

> Overlapping of programmes and certifications;

> Misguided focus on post-secondary TVET students instead of upper secondary students;

> Existence of multiple accreditation bodies and agencies implementing TVET;

> High operations cost resulting from the many ministries involved;

> Weak policies; and

> Private TVET providers being treated as competitors.

“All TVET institutions should be streamlined, rationalised, and consolidated, under the Education Ministry.

“This ensures that teachers and trainers are better taken care of under one scheme of service. And, there won’t be a need to close down any institutions if all facilities and resources are under one roof,” he said, adding that it would also be more cost effective for the Government while ensuring smoother communication between the industry and institutions.

Other reforms proposed by the Movement include:

> Reducing existing certifications to an important few;

> Having a single accreditation body for TVET;

> Establishing two educational pathways for students to choose from;

> Allowing industries to take the lead;

> Enhancing TVET apprenticeship programmes based on models from other developed countries; and

> Formulating policies and legislations to enhance careers in TVET.

Greater emphasis, and an overview, of TVET implementation is needed, Ahmad Tajudin said.

There should be training provisions to facilitate contributions from private TVET providers, and there must be closer collaboration between the industry and these providers.

“Our TVET system needs stronger institutional coordination, and greater transparency among the multiple public agencies.

“TVET restructuring is a small part of a holistic solution, but it’s a start to the reform,” he said, adding that strong political will from the Government was crucial to ensure the country’s TVET success.

Education Minister Dr Maszlee Malik said the Government would continue enhancing the capabilities of TVET institutions and systems to remain competitive and meet industry demands.

Speaking during his annual new year address in Serdang on Monday, he said the ministry would implement a harmonised accreditation and quality assurance system to enable student mobility in TVET institutions, which includes the Malaysian Technical University Network (MTUN).

The launch of Limkokwing TVET International, a TVET Malaysia Training Centre at Limkokwing University.MOHD SAHAR MISNI/The Star

The launch of Limkokwing TVET International, a TVET Malaysia Training Centre at Limkokwing University.MOHD SAHAR MISNI/The Star

MTUN, he said, should move in the direction of Fachhochschule – Germany’s tertiary education institution specialising in topical areas.

MTUN, he added, shouldn’t be evaluated solely based on publications, but also on the ability of the graduates produced to solve technical issues.

He said the ministry plans to increase the quality and delivery of TVET by enabling the industry to lead the curriculum development, avoid overlapping of programmes and resources, improve cost effectiveness, and widen the funding to increase enrolment.

He said the ministry was also in the midst of addressing recognition issues involving controversial vocational colleges.

He assured polytechnics and community colleges that they wouldn’t be sidelined in the reform process.

“To ensure the employability of our graduates, closer collaboration between these institutions and the industry – especially with the big players – will be prioritised,” he said, adding that these were part of the ministry’s efforts in making sure that TVET, polytechnics, vocational colleges, and community colleges, are no longer seen as second choice options.

In June last year, Dr Maszlee appointed Lembah Pantai MP Nurul Izzah Anwar to chair a special TVET task force.

The duties of the task force, said Dr Maszlee, was to conduct research across all ministries that provide TVET education and training, and recommend how the country’s TVET system can be improved. This includes a review of TVET education and training laws, and the possibility of a TVET commission.

However, the TVET industry was left reeling following Nurul Izzah’s resignation as PKR vice president on Dec 17, and her decision to no longer serve the federal government in any capacity.

“We’ll continue advocating for a sustainable and effective TVET implementation,” said Ahmad Tajudin.

Source: www.thestar.com.my

Comment: It’s good that the Ministry has identified the weaknesses & looking to implement the reforms (personally, I see that our TVET sector would soar to much greater heights compared to now, if reforms are implemented effectively & correctly).

But I have a doubt whether they would reform this particular weakness – Private TVET providers being treated as competitors.

It seems that there are plans to gradually “KILL” the private TVET providers based on their proposed plans (hearsay, so take it with a pinch of salt).


These include but not limited to:

1) Closing all TVET providers that are 2 stars and below after the impending 2019 star rating process (as early as March 2019). It generally affects the smaller private TVET providers who has very limited resources (manpower & finances) vs the public TVET institutions.
2) Closing/revoke Vocational Training Operation (VTO) programme of any private TVET institutions that has does not meet a min of 4 stars and above for that particular programme. Eventually, it would be just offered by the multiple satellite campuses of CIAST, nationwide,
3) Restrict the organising of the JPK’s various induction courses (PP-PPD-PPB, PP-PPT, PPL) to only  CIAST satellite campuses, nationwide.
4) and BEYOND – perhaps you can comment if you think what they are doing/planning to do is gonna KILL the private TVET providers.

Varsity CGPA to consist of academic, co-curricular activities

A picture of Malaysia’s oldest university, Universiti Malaya. The Education Ministry will now include students’ involvement in co-curricular activities into their cumulative grade point average, or CGPA. – The Malaysian Insider pic, March 14, 2015.A picture of Malaysia’s oldest university, Universiti Malaya.

The Education Ministry will now include students’ involvement in co-curricular activities into their cumulative grade point average, or CGPA. The cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of students at institutions of higher learning (IPT) will no longer be based solely on academic achievement as it will include their involvement in co-curricular activities as well.

Second Education Minister Datuk Seri Idris Jusoh said this would be implemented under the 2015-2025 Malaysian Education Blueprint – Higher Education (PPPM-PT) which would see the ministry’s intention to implement the integrated CGPA.

Through the initiative, CGPA will no longer be based on academic achievement alone and it will take into consideration, involvement in co-curricular, community and voluntary, skill and leadership activities.

“Presently, students who obtain all As in academic performance will obtain a CGPA of 4 or four flat but under the integrated CGPA, the student needs to be excellent on the overall to obtain four flat,” he told reporters after a briefing on PPPM-PT recently.He said the new CGPA would be implemented in the first shift of the PPPM-PT to produce enterprising, holistic and balanced graduates.

Discussions on the matter, he said, were being carried out at public universities and it might take some time before the new CGPA was implemented.

A PPPM-PT briefing for senior editors of the electronic and print media was also attended by Deputy Prime Minister Tan Sri Muhyiddin Yassin, who is also education minister.

The briefing was held in view of its launch scheduled on April 7, by Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Razak.

Idris said the new plan would also continue to empower technical, vocational, education and training (TVET) as a premier choice.

He said the initiative on TVET programme was to provide diversity in education through vocational colleges, polytechnics and community colleges, as well as the four technical universities in the country.

“The objective of making TVET as a choice began during the launch of the transformation of vocational education in 2012, and it will continue to be enhanced as the community starts to accept TVET.

“TVET is seen as viable alternative to produce good graduates with certificate or diploma qualifications and obtain high-paying jobs,” he said.

He said TVET and co-curricular activities based on industry needs would make programme graduates more sought after by the industries.

PPPM-PT is a continuation of the School Sector PPPM and the National Higher Education Strategic Plan (PSPTN).

The new plan encompasses 10 shifts on enterprising, holistic, balanced graduates, higher education talent excellence, lifelong learning community and quality TVET graduates.

The six other shifts are financial sustainability, empowering governance, enhancement of ecosystem innovation, renowned system at global level; global online learning and delivery of higher education for transformation.

The plan has been translated into 100 initiatives in three waves, namely the first wave for 2013-2015, second wave from 2016 to 2020 and the third wave from 2021 to 2025. – Bernama, March 14, 2015