Tag Archives: induction course

TVET, a stepchild no more

Students of Politeknik Ungku Omar get hands on training on automotive engineering at the workshop at their campus in Ipoh.

Students of Politeknik Ungku Omar get hands on training on automotive engineering at the workshop at their campus in Ipoh.

A framework has been proposed to address the long-standing problems of our TVET system

A NEW framework for technical and vocational training is in the pipelines.

If approved, the proposal will see a more streamlined, effective, and industry-relevant, Technical and Vocational Education Training (TVET) system.

Proposed by the National TVET Movement to the Economic Planning Unit last month, the framework aims to address the country’s ailing TVET system.

“Our focus is on upper secondary school students. We want to create a TVET champion.

TVET students being trained to be industry-ready. — File photo

TVET students being trained to be industry-ready. — File photo

“We want students to have better access to choices between academics and something more hands-on like TVET. This is what’s happening in other countries,” said Ahmad Tajudin, who recently retired as the Education Ministry deputy director-general.

Among those part of the Movement are the Federation of Human Resources Ministry’s Department of Skills Development (JPK) Accredited Centres (FeMac), National Council of Professors, and the National Parent-Teacher Associations’ Vocational and Technical Consultative Council.

For too long, TVET has been the “troubled stepchild” of the education system, he said.

This framework tackles long-standing problems like the:

> Overlapping of programmes and certifications;

> Misguided focus on post-secondary TVET students instead of upper secondary students;

> Existence of multiple accreditation bodies and agencies implementing TVET;

> High operations cost resulting from the many ministries involved;

> Weak policies; and

> Private TVET providers being treated as competitors.

“All TVET institutions should be streamlined, rationalised, and consolidated, under the Education Ministry.

“This ensures that teachers and trainers are better taken care of under one scheme of service. And, there won’t be a need to close down any institutions if all facilities and resources are under one roof,” he said, adding that it would also be more cost effective for the Government while ensuring smoother communication between the industry and institutions.

Other reforms proposed by the Movement include:

> Reducing existing certifications to an important few;

> Having a single accreditation body for TVET;

> Establishing two educational pathways for students to choose from;

> Allowing industries to take the lead;

> Enhancing TVET apprenticeship programmes based on models from other developed countries; and

> Formulating policies and legislations to enhance careers in TVET.

Greater emphasis, and an overview, of TVET implementation is needed, Ahmad Tajudin said.

There should be training provisions to facilitate contributions from private TVET providers, and there must be closer collaboration between the industry and these providers.

“Our TVET system needs stronger institutional coordination, and greater transparency among the multiple public agencies.

“TVET restructuring is a small part of a holistic solution, but it’s a start to the reform,” he said, adding that strong political will from the Government was crucial to ensure the country’s TVET success.

Education Minister Dr Maszlee Malik said the Government would continue enhancing the capabilities of TVET institutions and systems to remain competitive and meet industry demands.

Speaking during his annual new year address in Serdang on Monday, he said the ministry would implement a harmonised accreditation and quality assurance system to enable student mobility in TVET institutions, which includes the Malaysian Technical University Network (MTUN).

The launch of Limkokwing TVET International, a TVET Malaysia Training Centre at Limkokwing University.MOHD SAHAR MISNI/The Star

The launch of Limkokwing TVET International, a TVET Malaysia Training Centre at Limkokwing University.MOHD SAHAR MISNI/The Star

MTUN, he said, should move in the direction of Fachhochschule – Germany’s tertiary education institution specialising in topical areas.

MTUN, he added, shouldn’t be evaluated solely based on publications, but also on the ability of the graduates produced to solve technical issues.

He said the ministry plans to increase the quality and delivery of TVET by enabling the industry to lead the curriculum development, avoid overlapping of programmes and resources, improve cost effectiveness, and widen the funding to increase enrolment.

He said the ministry was also in the midst of addressing recognition issues involving controversial vocational colleges.

He assured polytechnics and community colleges that they wouldn’t be sidelined in the reform process.

“To ensure the employability of our graduates, closer collaboration between these institutions and the industry – especially with the big players – will be prioritised,” he said, adding that these were part of the ministry’s efforts in making sure that TVET, polytechnics, vocational colleges, and community colleges, are no longer seen as second choice options.

In June last year, Dr Maszlee appointed Lembah Pantai MP Nurul Izzah Anwar to chair a special TVET task force.

The duties of the task force, said Dr Maszlee, was to conduct research across all ministries that provide TVET education and training, and recommend how the country’s TVET system can be improved. This includes a review of TVET education and training laws, and the possibility of a TVET commission.

However, the TVET industry was left reeling following Nurul Izzah’s resignation as PKR vice president on Dec 17, and her decision to no longer serve the federal government in any capacity.

“We’ll continue advocating for a sustainable and effective TVET implementation,” said Ahmad Tajudin.

Source: www.thestar.com.my

Comment: It’s good that the Ministry has identified the weaknesses & looking to implement the reforms (personally, I see that our TVET sector would soar to much greater heights compared to now, if reforms are implemented effectively & correctly).

But I have a doubt whether they would reform this particular weakness – Private TVET providers being treated as competitors.

It seems that there are plans to gradually “KILL” the private TVET providers based on their proposed plans (hearsay, so take it with a pinch of salt).


These include but not limited to:

1) Closing all TVET providers that are 2 stars and below after the impending 2019 star rating process (as early as March 2019). It generally affects the smaller private TVET providers who has very limited resources (manpower & finances) vs the public TVET institutions.
2) Closing/revoke Vocational Training Operation (VTO) programme of any private TVET institutions that has does not meet a min of 4 stars and above for that particular programme. Eventually, it would be just offered by the multiple satellite campuses of CIAST, nationwide,
3) Restrict the organising of the JPK’s various induction courses (PP-PPD-PPB, PP-PPT, PPL) to only  CIAST satellite campuses, nationwide.
4) and BEYOND – perhaps you can comment if you think what they are doing/planning to do is gonna KILL the private TVET providers.

CONsultant or Consultant? My experience in the TVET sector

Just a quick sharing.

Yesterday, I had a meet up with another ex-public listed company, interested to purchase a TVET/JPK Accredited centre and/or MQA approved college license.

Guess what? A previous CONsultant tried to push them to purchase an MQA approved college license for RM5 million (not a hefty amount provided it has quite a few good programs & with KDN license with clean records). However, when pushed for more details from the potential buyer, the CONsultant started making stories that does not jive, hence the potential buyer has some reservations. When pushed further for process flow, the CONsultant came out with proposing them SKM/DKM via PPT method at a really hefty figure (5 digits/candidate!), without really probing what the customer actually wanted.

Now, I have this challenge to propose to the company on how they can achieve what they want but hey, it’s a good problem to have. If I can help them to achieve what they wanted, I’m sure I’ll be rewarded appropriately (not necessarily handomely though :-P)

Another case happened just last month. Another CONsultant proposed to sell his SLDN training centre (3-4 programs if not mistaken) for RM500K. Not sure what’s so valuable about the license but anyway he managed to convinced the potential buyer (to me, I wouldn’t even pay RM50K for that!). Unfortunately for the CONsultant, he made a very BIG MISTAKE, not sure it’s by choice or it was just plain silly. He asked to be paid in cash, no cheques, no bank accounts transfer, no receipts to be produced. WTF! Where on earth would a buyer agree to this kind of agreement? Even buying fruits for RM2 at fruit stalls along PLUS Hentian are given receipts!

And I really got a shock when a kursus induksi which cost only RM350 (maximum course fees chargeable, in case you are still unaware) was quoted at 6 times more! And because of the CONsultant’s greed (did not pay me & lied saying he wasn’t paid & fooled by the client – despite the client made the inflated payments to him), I had no choice but to go after the client directly for the payment. Well, you should know what’s the ending for the CONsultant.

Moral of the above 2 REAL LIFE stories:

1. Be knowledgable in your area if you really WANT to consult someone on that area, otherwise, be upfront & frank with your client that you’re working with an associate and NEVER pretend that you know everything despite KNOWING NOTHING about it as clients may sometimes be more knowledgable than you in that area if you’re not the EXPERT! You may not be lucky to be able to CON all the way, just like the Malay proverb:
Sepandai-pandai tupai melompat, akhirnya akan jatuh ke tanah juga

2. Be as transparent as possible with your clients, they will appreciate it.

3. GOD will reward you if you work hard & genuinely.

4. DON’t MESS UP with TVET Malaysia@I Smart Educare, we will go after what we’re supposed to get

5. Consultants (individuals or companies) that agrees everything that you requested as easy as ABC, especially without much thinking, should give you an ALARM! Don’t fall into the trap. Probe further on the Consultants past track records, check up for any info on the web (just Google the company or person, if not much web presences or many negative comments about the Consultant, that’s another ALARM!), testimonials and etc.

With that, I hope you will not be the next victim to such CONsultant!

And should you need any advice on TVET matters especially related to JPK/SKM/VTO/Induction course, feel free to call/whatsapp (pls introduce yourself, who you are, what you want to know, in details) or email us at:
012-3123430 or ismarteducare @ gmail.com

Freeze hurting our agriculture – Labour shortage issues

Cause and effect: Prices of vegetables and poultry are expected to keep increasing due to manpower shortage at the farms.

PETALING JAYA: The freeze on foreign labour is hurting the local agriculture industry here with livestock farmers claiming that the industry will be crippled within a year if nothing is done.

Federation of Livestock Farmers’ Associations Malaysia president Datuk Jeffrey Ng said consumers would have to pay more for imported meat because local farms would be forced to close down due to the lack of workers.

“We do not want this to happen,” he said.

Stressing that many farms were struggling to keep up with production to meet market needs, Ng said he was not optimistic of the situation getting any better.

“I do not know how long we can sustain because the workers are leaving gradually after their contracts end,” he said.

Ng said claims that foreign workers contributed to social and security problems could not be applied to the livestock industry because the farms were mostly away from the cities.

“Our workers eat and stay at the farms.

“They do not get their weekly off days like others, so they can hardly leave their work place,” he said.

He pointed out that the industry was facing a shortage of at least 8,000 workers.

“We are not asking for more but to replace those whose contracts have expired,” he said.

In Johor Baru, the state’s Small and Medium Poultry Farmers Association president Lim Ka Cheng said farmers and businesses had voiced out their concerns over the shortage of foreign workers.

“Johor usually supplies some 10 million dressed chickens and eight million eggs each month but production has dropped by some 20% since early this year.

“We are the top producer of chickens and eggs in the country, contributing 30% of the overall supply while 10% of the production is exported to Singapore,” he said.

Lim said during the recent meeting with the Federation of Malaysian Vegetable Farmers Association, Malaysian Mushroom Research Association and Malaysian Fruit Farmers Association, it was highlighted that the shortage of workers was at a “very worrying stage”.

“The Government’s policy has posed a huge challenge for us as foreign workers cannot extend their contracts nor can business owners bring in more foreign labour to work at farms and sites,” he said when contacted.

He said the production sector would be affected if the problem was not resolved soon.

Lim said locals stayed away from such jobs and the association’s 300 chicken farmers needed foreign workers to maintain the hygiene of the farms and processing plants.

 Source: The Star Online

Comments: Should reconsider previous implementation of an induction course for the foreign workers to attend, learning about our culture, language & law. Perhaps that may lead to lower social & security problems. Or is that just an excuse by the government to make way for locals to be employed (but yet the low skill & low knowledge locals still avoid these jobs?)