Tag Archives: JPK

TVET curriculum to simulate actual workplace, says Kula

PETALING JAYA: The Technical and Vocational Education Training (TVET) curriculum will soon simulate actual workplace situations.

These learning modules, which look to better prepare students for the working world, will be embedded into the curriculum.

Human Resources Minister M. Kulasegaran (pic) said the modules, known as “Problem, Project, Production”, are intended to engage students with real world tasks.

These are some of the measures that will be implemented soon, he said, to strengthen and improve the TVET delivery implementation.

His speech text was read by human resources department planning and research division director Junita Mohamed Ali during the Malaysian TVET Forum 2019.

On Jan 20, StarEdu reported that a new national framework sets out to level the playing field between academics and TVET, offering students more career options for their future.

“TVET is a branch of education that cannot be overlooked by any government.

“Chief among (these measures) is to elevate the quality of TVET programmes as well as TVET instructors; it is essential for instructors, public or private, to gain industrial experience so as to ensure they will be kept abreast with technology,” said Kulasegaran.

“The plan also includes continued funding under the Skills Development Fund (SDF) for TVET students who pursue high demand programmes by industries.

“Existing SDF loan mechanism for employee upskilling and reskilling will be revamped to increase the number of recipients through a cost-sharing arrangement with the industry.

“It’s important for the industry to be deeply involved in the financing aspect of TVET.”

To further strengthen TVET delivery, Kulasegaran said TVET training institutions will need to embrace and integrate the 11 important pillars of the fourth Industrial Revolution in their training, such as Cloud Computing, Cybersecurity and Augmented Reality.

Source: https://www.thestar.com.my

Comment: Am not sure how would be the funds from SDF/PTPK be allocated but going at the current rate, looks like many private TVET institutions that depended heavily on the funding to recruit students would be closing soon.

So if you intend to set up at TVET centre, do your research properly, think what kind of students that you want to have & don’t just think about making money from their tuition fees, ensure they have bright prospects to get into employment with decent pay and your business will surely be sustainable & maybe even flourish when majority are suffering at thinking how to get loans from SDF/PTPK.

Overhaul of TVET programmes in the works

PETALING JAYA: The Education Ministry wants to reform the Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) programmes in the country, says its director-general Datuk Dr Amin Senin.

Amin said that this was why several TVET programmes were halted for a while to give time for the Malaysian Qualifications Agency and Department of Skills Develop­ment to evaluate its curriculum to ensure TVET meets the quality benchmark set by the government and industrial needs.

“The claims made by some that certain TVET programmes have been discontinued are false.

“The ministry only wants to ensure certification and industry standards are met and used as reference in terms of marketability, improving skills, and in making curriculum improvements,” he said in a statement yesterday.

Dr Amin said that the ministry started the Vocational Education Transformation programme in 2012 to create an opportunity for students, who are interested in technical and vocational subjects to gain education to meet the country’s industrial needs.

This, he said, meant that the ministry needed to ensure that the programmes provided by institutions involved were of high quality and based on the coordination of operational policies, development of physical infrastructure and the provision of facilities, and the continuous development of professionalism for teachers and officers.

“After seven years of the programmes being introduced, it is high time that the programmes offered gave importance to a higher standard of education, in line with (the government’s) wishes of producing trainees of the highest quality,” he said.

He added that steps taken to make the programmes better were taken in line with views from stakeholders, including the National Union of the Teaching Profession (NUTP).

“The majority of stakeholders are supportive of the ministry’s wishes to make relevant improvements for the benefit of students and the country,” he added.

He said that the steps to improve the programmes, offered by vocational colleges, were taken after having had discussions with stakeholders since May 2018.

Source: https://www.thestar.com.my

TVET, a stepchild no more

Students of Politeknik Ungku Omar get hands on training on automotive engineering at the workshop at their campus in Ipoh.

Students of Politeknik Ungku Omar get hands on training on automotive engineering at the workshop at their campus in Ipoh.

A framework has been proposed to address the long-standing problems of our TVET system

A NEW framework for technical and vocational training is in the pipelines.

If approved, the proposal will see a more streamlined, effective, and industry-relevant, Technical and Vocational Education Training (TVET) system.

Proposed by the National TVET Movement to the Economic Planning Unit last month, the framework aims to address the country’s ailing TVET system.

“Our focus is on upper secondary school students. We want to create a TVET champion.

TVET students being trained to be industry-ready. — File photo

TVET students being trained to be industry-ready. — File photo

“We want students to have better access to choices between academics and something more hands-on like TVET. This is what’s happening in other countries,” said Ahmad Tajudin, who recently retired as the Education Ministry deputy director-general.

Among those part of the Movement are the Federation of Human Resources Ministry’s Department of Skills Development (JPK) Accredited Centres (FeMac), National Council of Professors, and the National Parent-Teacher Associations’ Vocational and Technical Consultative Council.

For too long, TVET has been the “troubled stepchild” of the education system, he said.

This framework tackles long-standing problems like the:

> Overlapping of programmes and certifications;

> Misguided focus on post-secondary TVET students instead of upper secondary students;

> Existence of multiple accreditation bodies and agencies implementing TVET;

> High operations cost resulting from the many ministries involved;

> Weak policies; and

> Private TVET providers being treated as competitors.

“All TVET institutions should be streamlined, rationalised, and consolidated, under the Education Ministry.

“This ensures that teachers and trainers are better taken care of under one scheme of service. And, there won’t be a need to close down any institutions if all facilities and resources are under one roof,” he said, adding that it would also be more cost effective for the Government while ensuring smoother communication between the industry and institutions.

Other reforms proposed by the Movement include:

> Reducing existing certifications to an important few;

> Having a single accreditation body for TVET;

> Establishing two educational pathways for students to choose from;

> Allowing industries to take the lead;

> Enhancing TVET apprenticeship programmes based on models from other developed countries; and

> Formulating policies and legislations to enhance careers in TVET.

Greater emphasis, and an overview, of TVET implementation is needed, Ahmad Tajudin said.

There should be training provisions to facilitate contributions from private TVET providers, and there must be closer collaboration between the industry and these providers.

“Our TVET system needs stronger institutional coordination, and greater transparency among the multiple public agencies.

“TVET restructuring is a small part of a holistic solution, but it’s a start to the reform,” he said, adding that strong political will from the Government was crucial to ensure the country’s TVET success.

Education Minister Dr Maszlee Malik said the Government would continue enhancing the capabilities of TVET institutions and systems to remain competitive and meet industry demands.

Speaking during his annual new year address in Serdang on Monday, he said the ministry would implement a harmonised accreditation and quality assurance system to enable student mobility in TVET institutions, which includes the Malaysian Technical University Network (MTUN).

The launch of Limkokwing TVET International, a TVET Malaysia Training Centre at Limkokwing University.MOHD SAHAR MISNI/The Star

The launch of Limkokwing TVET International, a TVET Malaysia Training Centre at Limkokwing University.MOHD SAHAR MISNI/The Star

MTUN, he said, should move in the direction of Fachhochschule – Germany’s tertiary education institution specialising in topical areas.

MTUN, he added, shouldn’t be evaluated solely based on publications, but also on the ability of the graduates produced to solve technical issues.

He said the ministry plans to increase the quality and delivery of TVET by enabling the industry to lead the curriculum development, avoid overlapping of programmes and resources, improve cost effectiveness, and widen the funding to increase enrolment.

He said the ministry was also in the midst of addressing recognition issues involving controversial vocational colleges.

He assured polytechnics and community colleges that they wouldn’t be sidelined in the reform process.

“To ensure the employability of our graduates, closer collaboration between these institutions and the industry – especially with the big players – will be prioritised,” he said, adding that these were part of the ministry’s efforts in making sure that TVET, polytechnics, vocational colleges, and community colleges, are no longer seen as second choice options.

In June last year, Dr Maszlee appointed Lembah Pantai MP Nurul Izzah Anwar to chair a special TVET task force.

The duties of the task force, said Dr Maszlee, was to conduct research across all ministries that provide TVET education and training, and recommend how the country’s TVET system can be improved. This includes a review of TVET education and training laws, and the possibility of a TVET commission.

However, the TVET industry was left reeling following Nurul Izzah’s resignation as PKR vice president on Dec 17, and her decision to no longer serve the federal government in any capacity.

“We’ll continue advocating for a sustainable and effective TVET implementation,” said Ahmad Tajudin.

Source: www.thestar.com.my

Comment: It’s good that the Ministry has identified the weaknesses & looking to implement the reforms (personally, I see that our TVET sector would soar to much greater heights compared to now, if reforms are implemented effectively & correctly).

But I have a doubt whether they would reform this particular weakness – Private TVET providers being treated as competitors.

It seems that there are plans to gradually “KILL” the private TVET providers based on their proposed plans (hearsay, so take it with a pinch of salt).


These include but not limited to:

1) Closing all TVET providers that are 2 stars and below after the impending 2019 star rating process (as early as March 2019). It generally affects the smaller private TVET providers who has very limited resources (manpower & finances) vs the public TVET institutions.
2) Closing/revoke Vocational Training Operation (VTO) programme of any private TVET institutions that has does not meet a min of 4 stars and above for that particular programme. Eventually, it would be just offered by the multiple satellite campuses of CIAST, nationwide,
3) Restrict the organising of the JPK’s various induction courses (PP-PPD-PPB, PP-PPT, PPL) to only  CIAST satellite campuses, nationwide.
4) and BEYOND – perhaps you can comment if you think what they are doing/planning to do is gonna KILL the private TVET providers.

CONsultant or Consultant? My experience in the TVET sector

Just a quick sharing.

Yesterday, I had a meet up with another ex-public listed company, interested to purchase a TVET/JPK Accredited centre and/or MQA approved college license.

Guess what? A previous CONsultant tried to push them to purchase an MQA approved college license for RM5 million (not a hefty amount provided it has quite a few good programs & with KDN license with clean records). However, when pushed for more details from the potential buyer, the CONsultant started making stories that does not jive, hence the potential buyer has some reservations. When pushed further for process flow, the CONsultant came out with proposing them SKM/DKM via PPT method at a really hefty figure (5 digits/candidate!), without really probing what the customer actually wanted.

Now, I have this challenge to propose to the company on how they can achieve what they want but hey, it’s a good problem to have. If I can help them to achieve what they wanted, I’m sure I’ll be rewarded appropriately (not necessarily handomely though :-P)

Another case happened just last month. Another CONsultant proposed to sell his SLDN training centre (3-4 programs if not mistaken) for RM500K. Not sure what’s so valuable about the license but anyway he managed to convinced the potential buyer (to me, I wouldn’t even pay RM50K for that!). Unfortunately for the CONsultant, he made a very BIG MISTAKE, not sure it’s by choice or it was just plain silly. He asked to be paid in cash, no cheques, no bank accounts transfer, no receipts to be produced. WTF! Where on earth would a buyer agree to this kind of agreement? Even buying fruits for RM2 at fruit stalls along PLUS Hentian are given receipts!

And I really got a shock when a kursus induksi which cost only RM350 (maximum course fees chargeable, in case you are still unaware) was quoted at 6 times more! And because of the CONsultant’s greed (did not pay me & lied saying he wasn’t paid & fooled by the client – despite the client made the inflated payments to him), I had no choice but to go after the client directly for the payment. Well, you should know what’s the ending for the CONsultant.

Moral of the above 2 REAL LIFE stories:

1. Be knowledgable in your area if you really WANT to consult someone on that area, otherwise, be upfront & frank with your client that you’re working with an associate and NEVER pretend that you know everything despite KNOWING NOTHING about it as clients may sometimes be more knowledgable than you in that area if you’re not the EXPERT! You may not be lucky to be able to CON all the way, just like the Malay proverb:
Sepandai-pandai tupai melompat, akhirnya akan jatuh ke tanah juga

2. Be as transparent as possible with your clients, they will appreciate it.

3. GOD will reward you if you work hard & genuinely.

4. DON’t MESS UP with TVET Malaysia@I Smart Educare, we will go after what we’re supposed to get

5. Consultants (individuals or companies) that agrees everything that you requested as easy as ABC, especially without much thinking, should give you an ALARM! Don’t fall into the trap. Probe further on the Consultants past track records, check up for any info on the web (just Google the company or person, if not much web presences or many negative comments about the Consultant, that’s another ALARM!), testimonials and etc.

With that, I hope you will not be the next victim to such CONsultant!

And should you need any advice on TVET matters especially related to JPK/SKM/VTO/Induction course, feel free to call/whatsapp (pls introduce yourself, who you are, what you want to know, in details) or email us at:
012-3123430 or ismarteducare @ gmail.com

TVET centre (Pusat Bertauliah JPK) in NS for SALE

This is the latest TVET centre for sale on offer (refer to www.jpkmalaysia.com/our-services for complete list)

1. NS (IPTS license also available for sale)

Code: FB-025-3:2013 (4 Star)
Program: Corporate Executive Secretaryship
Current students: 12
2018 PTPK quota: 25
AND
Code: EE-320-2:2012
Program: Electrical – Single Phase
Current students: 24
2018 PTPK quota: 20

Rental expiring Jun 2019 (3 lots – RM7,800)
Note: Some liabilities/debts

Update: No PTPK quota

CALL 012-3123430 or email ismarteducare@gmail.com NOW before it’s gone

PINDAAN PEMAKLUMAN BERKAITAN PEMANSUHAN PELAKSANAAN KELULUSAN PENTAULIAHAN PROGRAM SECARA BERSYARAT DI BAWAH SISTEM PERSIJILAN KEMAHIRAN MALAYSIA MULAI 1 JANUARI 2019

Ruj     :        JPK/702/1/10 JLD 14 (36)

Tarikh :        18 Disember 2018

Adalah dimaklumkan bahawa Jabatan telah mengkaji semula keputusan pemansuhan pelaksanaan kelulusan pentauliahan program secara bersyarat di bawah Sistem Persijilan Kemahiran Malaysia mulai 1 Januari 2019 yang telah dihebahkan melalui arahan pentadbiran (No. Rujukan : JPK/702/1/10 JLD 14 (18) bertarikh 30 Julai 2018.

Selaras dengan ini, Jabatan telah memutuskan supaya tiada lagi kelulusan pentauliahan program secara bersyarat akan dikeluarkan mulai 1 Januari 2019, kecuali untuk dua (2) keadaan berikut :

  1. Pentauliahan program bagi NOSS / NCS baharu; dan
  2. Pentauliahan pembaharuan program untuk menyelesaikan pelatih sedia ada sahaja.

Sehubungan itu, selain dua keadaan di atas, Penyedia Latihan Kemahiran / Pusat Bertauliah hendaklah mematuhi semua kriteria pentauliahan program kerana tiada lagi kelulusan secara bersyarat akan diberikan selepas tarikh kuatkuasa.

Justeru, hebahan yang telah dikeluarkan melalui rujukan JPK/702/1/10 Jld. 14 (18) bertarikh 30 Julai 2018 adalah terbatal.

Sekian dimaklumkan. Terima kasih.

“BERKHIDMAT UNTUK NEGARA”

“Pekerja Berkemahiran Peneraju Kecemerlangan Negara”

Ketua Pengarah
Jabatan Pembangunan Kemahiran
Kementerian Sumber Manusia

Sumber: www.dsd.gov.my

How will Nurul Izzah’s TVET bill help youths?

A commission overseeing all Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) institutes could soon become a reality, thanks to an upcoming private member’s bill by Permatang Pauh MP Nurul Izzah Anwar.

But how will the body – dubbed the Industry Skills Education and Training (ISET) Commission – impact youths who are studying or will study at TVET institutes?

Asked about this in an interview at Parliament on Monday, Nurul Izzah told Malaysiakini that one improvement she hoped to see was for TVET graduates to get adequate wages.

This will be a trickle-down effect stemming from the overall improvement of the TVET programme.

The TVET empowerment committee chairperson said the ISET Commission will, among others, facilitate data sharing between all TVET institutes, many of whom are currently operating in silos.

This will in turn facilitate better matching between TVET programmes and industry needs, for example.

 “If there’s a wonderful report by Mida (Malaysian Investment Development Authority), I’d like to access it so all the TVET institutes can fully utilise it.

“For example, perhaps there’s a plateau in the hospitality field, we don’t have enough hotels for all the graduates (to work in).

“So you can shift into medicine, or telemedicine. Geriatric specialists are especially in need because we have an aging population so maybe the institutes can train them as nurses instead,” she said.

Ensuring better job security

The ISET Commission, she said, will also ensure better job security for TVET graduates and avoid repeats of past situations, such as students from government-run institutes being unable to find employment due to their certificates not being recognised by the Public Service Department (PSD).

 She said the ISET Commission will also work with the Malaysian Qualifications Agency to develop ways to convert TVET programmes into credit hours so graduates can further their studies.

Nurul Izzah also aims to make the ratings of the different TVET institutes public, so that parents and youths can assess which schools are best for them.

“You want to change lives, by having reputable programmes that can allow them to have a better degree of social mobility, and so they can get better pay. This is what we’re about,” she said.

One example that shows how successful TVET can be is Politeknik Mersing’s cybersecurity programme, which the PKR vice-president is especially proud of.

“In Mersing, they have cybersecurity experts that will automatically get a job in Singapore (upon graduation).

“Will I ever look down on cybersecurity graduates in Mersing? Never! Because they know their stuff.

“That’s how you change perception (of TVET). You get meaningful wages through programmes that the industry recognises. It’s a no-brainer,” she said.

Biting the bullet

She stressed that TVET can also help revolutionise other sectors, including agriculture and even traditional sectors in rural areas.

“How about the Orang Asli children in rural areas? They also want jobs, they want opportunities to live in their villages but yet have a meaningful wage.

“So it’s not just about the fourth industrial revolution, but how the Internet helps them achieve their outcome for their traditional sectors,” she said.All this requires strong political will to see changes through, she said.

For example, the government and under-performing TVET institutes must “bite the bullet” and make improvements.

Institutes that don’t improve or don’t fulfill conditions required by the commission will run the risk of being shut down.

Nurul Izzah’s ISET Commission bill is expected to be tabled soon.

Once tabled, it will be up to either the Education or Human Resources Ministries to adopt the bill so that it can be debated in the Dewan Rakyat.

https://m.malaysiakini.com

Malaysian varsity takes over Ugandan institute

Hand over. The Minister of State for Higher

Hand over. The Minister of State for Higher Education, Mr John Chrysostom Muyingo (second right), 2nd Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for East African Affairs Kirunda Kivejinja (right), and other officials tour Namataba Technical Institute in Mukono District after handing it over to Limkokwing University of Malaysia yesterday. PHOTO BY DAMALIE MUKHAYE

By Damali Mukhaye
Kampala. Limkokwing University of Malaysia has taken over the government-owned Namataba Technical Institute in Mukono District.

The Malaysian creative technology university will offer technology courses to students.
Handing over the institute to the Malaysian officials at Namataba campus yesterday, the Uganda’s Minister of State for Higher Education, Mr John Chrysostom Muyingo, said the current courses offered at the institute have been phased out. He represented the Minister of Education, Ms Janet Museveni.

The courses include automotive vehicles, construction, welding and fabrication.
Mr Muyingo said the students who have been offering the two-year certificate vocational courses at the institute completed their examinations last Friday and the Education ministry did not admit fresh students last year.

He said the new management of Limkokwing University will take over the institute effective next academic year 2019/2010.
“The Ministry of Education last year signed a memorandum of understanding with Limkokwing University to establish a campus in Uganda. Namataba Technical Institute was selected to host the campus which will provide our students with skills training. We are optimistic that this university will bring her international expertise as a contribution towards the development of high technology and innovative training programmes to drive us towards our Vision 2020,” said Ms Museveni in a speech read for her by Mr Muyingo.

“As government, we attach great importance to the teaching of practical skills and we therefore agreed to collaborate with this university in a public-private-partnership to increase the opportunities of Uganda in gaining access to Limkokwing TVET-oriented courses without having to leave Uganda,” she added.

The Senior President of Limkokwing University, Ms Dato’ Gail Phung, said the university will be the first of its kind in East Africa and will see students from Uganda and the region acquire international degrees and certificates that will enable them compete for jobs worldwide.
“We are set to offer industrial courses which are relevant to Uganda’s economy with high digital technology and with this partnership, we are going to empower the youth of Uganda,” Ms Phung said.

Mr Muyingo and the Malaysian delegation immediately left for State House to meet First Lady and Education Minister, Ms Museveni, for further discussions on tuition charges and other technical considerations before Limkokwing University takes over the institute.
The institute’s principal, Mr Ronald Muwambu, said their 17 teaching and five non-teaching staff will leave to pave way for the new administration.

He said he handed over their staff list to the Ministry of Education for redeployment.
The Mukono Resident District Commissioner, Mr Fred Bamwine, urged government to fulfil its pledge to the local people of giving out sponsorship to the less privileged and reducing tuition charges earlier agreed since they are the host of the new university.

Source: https://www.monitor.co.ug

Comment: Wonder would Limkokwing University of Malaysia be offering our own Malaysian Skill Certificate, Diploma & Advance Diploma Skill Certificate (SKM/DKM/DLKM)? Or it has no relation to our Department of Skill Development (DSD/JPK) at all?

Adakah PERUNDING (pasal induksi/SKM/VTO/pentauliahan pusat) anda bercakap benar??

If you don’t understand Malay well, can always email or call us for further explanation.
如果您不太了解马来语,可以随时发送电子邮件或致电我们进一步了解详情

Selama 17 tahun min berkecimpung dalam bidang latihan kemahiran ni (terutamanya yang berkaitan dengan JPK), macam-macam kes penipuan telah min jumpa/dengar.

Berikut adalah senarainya, tak terhad kepada ini sahaja (mungkin min lupa atau tak pernah dengar/jumpa tapi memang berlaku):

1. Sijil induksi PALSU – Sebelum ni, tahun 2000an, memang ada sesetengah penganjur yang hit & run, cetak sijil sendiri & JUAL kepada peserta (tak perlu ikuti kursus). Ia samalah seperti penjualan sijil/diploma/ijazah di universiti ataupun sijil cuti sakit. Namun, pihak Jabatan Pembangunan Kemahiran (JPK) telah mengambil langkah untuk membendung perkara ni dari berlanjutan dimana:
a) Penganjur tidak boleh cetak sijil sendiri lagi
b) Sijil telah ada ciri-ciri keselamatan (bukan setakat no siri sijil sahaja) – itu yang menyebabkan kekadang sijil dapat lambat sebab JPK kehabisan sijil & perlu tunggu stok dari Percetakan Nasional Malaysia

TIPS: Cari penganjur yang sudah lama (> 10 tahun kalau boleh) & kerap menganjur (lebih 6 kali setahun) kerana mereka tidak berani bertindak sebarangan & juga senantiasa mengikut perkembangan terkini.

2. Bukti PALSU – Ini kerap berlaku terutamanya dalam permohonan SKM secara PPT.
Ini mungkin salah sesetengah pemohon, ada yang sememangnya tahu dia tak layak tapi BAYAR perunding untuk kaodim, biasanya beribu-ribu.
Macam mana min tahu? Sebab ada kisah benar yang diceritakan oleh PPL-PPT (Pegawai Pengesah Luaran yang mengesahkan penilaian PP-PPT).
Cth: Ada seorang lelaki yang langsung tak pernah terlibat dengan kecantikan (cuma ada perniagaan dalam bidang ni) mewujudkan bukti palsu (gambar/invois/sijil) tapi telah digagalkan oleh PPL-PPT yang jujur tu. Apa yang menggeramkan min adalah dengar khabar setelah calon (melalui perunding) minta PPL-PPT ditukarkan, calon tu LULUS.
Geram betul, calon/perunding/PP-PPT seperti nilah yang menjahanamkan kualiti SKM #^@*%

TIPS: Baca Panduan Permohonan SKM secara PPT @ ikuti kursus induksi PP-PPT – jadual disini supaya anda ada sedikit idea apa yang diperlukan dan sekiranya dah faham, mohon terus dengan JPK, cuma RM300/setahap.

Kebelakangan ni, ada perunding yang menjanjikan calon yang tiada pengalaman mengajar bidang kemahiran bahawa mereka layak mohon VTO secara PPT.  Agak-agaknya buat bukti PALSU lagi kot. Ni juga kisah benar,  dimana 2 juruteknik auto yang tidak pernah mengajar dijanjikan oleh perunding bahawa mereka boleh dapat VTO secara PPT!

Itu yang menyumbangkan kepada banyak isu pemegang sijil VTO yang tidak boleh mengajar dengan baik ataupun tak tahu sangat tentang WIM (bahan pengajaran bertulis). Min tak nafikan juga ada Pusat Bertauliah VTO tertentu yang bagi ‘lesen terbang’, sehinggakan ada beberapa PB VTO yang telah ditarik pentauliahannya dan menyebabkan permohonan PB VTO baru/penambahan program VTO ni dibekukan.
Untuk pengetahuan anda, pengalaman mengajar minima adalah 4 tahun kalau nak mohon VTO secara PPT

3. Penjualan WIM yang tidak menepati format ataupun jumlah jam yang sepatutnya
Ha, ni berlaku bukan sahaja dalam dunia latihan kemahiran tapi syarikat gergasi MNC pun ada juga yang melakukan kesalahan sebegini.

Biasa lihat ni kan?

Sudah banyak PB/pembeli yang kantoi dengan janji-janji manis individu/perunding bahawa WIM yang mereka beli memenuhi spesifikasi/format JPK tetapi sebenarnya tidak.
Antara isu yang kerap timbul adalah:
1. Format (tidak mengikut format terkini)
2. Jumlah jam yang tidak menepati kehendak NOSS (sudah banyak kes untuk ni, terutamanya untuk program yang ada kes khas seperti FB-024-2 (1200j dan bukannya 800j)
3. Jadual Pembahagian WIM yang tidak menggunakan ayat yang betul ataupun setara dengan WIM yang dibangunkan

TIPS: Suruh penjual emelkan sampel WIM lengkap (ada Kertas Penerangan/Kerja/Tugasan, Pelan Mengajar Teori/Amali, Kertas Penilaian Pengetahuan (KA)/Prestasi (PA), lepas tu cross check dengan format WIM terikini (2017)  dan juga NOSS.

Cukuplah setakat ni, kalau anda ada sebarang lagi kes penipuan/janji tidak serupa bikin yang nak dikongsi (tak kira pasal SKM, induksi, pentauliahan PB, WIM ke apa) supaya orang ramai lebih berhati-hati dan tidak tertipu,
sila emel ke ismarteducare@gmail.com, terima kasih.

Tips mencari perunding yang jujur:

1. Dah lama berkecimpung dalam bidang latihan kemahiran (ni pun tak menjamin apa-apa)
2. Cuba dapatkan testimoni/pengesyoran dari 2-3 pihak, kalau ada.
3. Dapatkan pandangan/nasihat dari 2-3 individu/syarikat.
4. Sekiranya masih rasa was-was, sila rujuk dengan min atau lebih baik, JPK di 03-88865589.

* singkatan min bermaksud admin ya 😀

Private TVET students can continue with studies after govt pumps in RM105m

Human Resources Minister M. Kulasegaran said RM105 million had been disbursed by the ministry to the 400 private TVET colleges in the country. — Picture by Marcus Pheong
Human Resources Minister M. Kulasegaran said RM105 million had been disbursed by the ministry to the 400 private TVET colleges in the country. — Picture by Marcus Pheong

LUMUT, Oct 20 — The 20,000 students from private Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges can continue with their studies after the Human Resources Ministry obtained RM140 million allocation from the Finance Ministry.

Human Resources Minister M. Kulasegaran said the funding was received recently and so far RM105 million had been disbursed by the ministry to the 400 private TVET colleges in the country.

“The delay in payments by Skills Development Fund Corp (PTPK) was funding in the corporation was running low,” he said.

Speaking to reporters here today after opening Dr VVV Menon community hall at Sri Ramar Temple in the Lumut Naval Base here, the Ipoh Barat MP explained that when PTPK was set up, it had a RM1 billion rotating fund.

“Annually, the government provides a grant of up to RM200 million to provide loans for the recipients mostly from the B40 (bottom 40th percentile) families,” he said.

“However, after graduating, they failed to repay their loans which affected the corporation’s operation,” he added.

He said the ministry was trying to get the defaulters, numbering up to a staggering 130,000, to pay up.

“The corporation has set up a call centre manned by 200 people to call the defaulters and remind them to pay up their loans,” he added, noting that he was also contemplating asking Prime Minister Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamed to write a letter to the defaulters and ask them to perform their civic duty.

“If the defaulters do not pay, it will be difficult for the corporation to continue giving loans to incoming trainees,” he said.

On October 9, Malay Mail reported that more than 20,000 students from private Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges may be forced to discontinue their studies due to inadequate allocations to the Skills Development Fund Corp (PTPK).

The Federation of JPK Accredited Centres (FeMAC) said these students are largely from the bottom 40th percentile (B40) and have no other means to pay for their courses without the PTPK loans.

FeMAC also complained that over the last four years, the Human Resources Ministry has been consistently reducing the allocation of funds for PTPK with the total amount of funds being cut being reduced by a staggering 60 per cent.

Private TVET centres can train between 40,000 and 60,000 students annually.

Comment: Am just wondering, it’s the borrower’s attitude that take things for granted where they think it’s ok not to repay back education loans or due to their low income status after graduation?

Source: https://www.malaymail.com