Tag Archives: MTUN

Kumpulan pertama lulusan diploma kemahiran lanjut pengajian di MTUN September ini

PUTRAJAYA, 30 Jan (Bernama) — Kumpulan pertama pelajar lulusan diploma kemahiran bakal melanjutkan pengajian ke peringkat ijazah sarjana muda di Rangkaian Universiti Teknikal Malaysia (MTUN) pada sesi pengajian September ini, kata Timbalan Menteri Sumber Manusia Datuk Mahfuz Omar.

Beliau berkata Agensi Kelayakan Malaysia (MQA) dalam mesyuarat Majlis Pembangunan Kemahiran Kebangsaan (MPKK) secara prinsipnya bersetuju supaya keputusan Sijil Pelajaran Malaysia (SPM) tidak diambil kira untuk kemasukan ke peringkat ijazah sarjana muda sekiranya pemohon sudah mempunyai diploma atau diploma lanjutan dalam bidang kemahiran.

“Sebelum ini, dia (lulusan diploma kemahiran) tidak boleh masuk universiti sebab perlu tengok SPM, tetapi kalau dia dah ada diploma yang lebih tinggi daripada SPM, kita mahu supaya mereka diberi pengiktirafan,” katanya pada sidang media selepas mempengerusikan mesyuarat MPKK, di sini hari ini.

Sumber: http://www.bernama.com

Komen: Bukan setakat MTUN je yang boleh terima, ada juga Universiti Awam (UA) dan dalam masa yang tak jauh lagi UA/IPTA serta IPTS pun mungkin boleh berbuat demikian.
Admin pun telah menerima panggilan baru-baru ni dari salah sebuah UA untuk membincangkan kerjasama.
Sekiranya IPTS anda berminat, boleh hubungi admin juga di ismarteducare@gmail.com atau 012-3123430 untuk bincangkan butirannya.

Bringing back credibility to tertiary education

‘For universities to be relevant, excellent and effective, a high level of quality must be achieved in various aspects, and this can be done through having academics who are more visible with works that are used by the community,’ – DR MASZLEE MALIK, Education Minister

Many will find higher education a challenging world as it is here that students will get to know their real selves, the destination of the journey they are taking in life and the means of getting there.

Hence why the Education Ministry finds it crucial to bring back credibility to public universities and higher education through improved quality and emphasis on values as the core of education.

Education Minister Dr Maszlee Malik, in delivering his 2019 mandate titled “Education for All” last week, said the ministry has underlined four key directions for higher education – quality, autonomy, collaboration and internationalisation.

“University is an open intellectual field. It is there that theoretical debates, lively and open discourse, as well as the sharing of knowledge take place.

“For universities to be relevant, excellent and effective, a high level of quality must be achieved in various aspects, and this can be done through having academics who are more visible with works that are used by the community. We encourage universities to nurture the culture of having dialogues, debates, discourse and other intellectual programmes that will provide solutions to society’s problems and develop the nation,” he said.

Ethics is another important aspect that has to be focused on, he said.

“Bad work ethics, plagiarism, and academic bullying must cease. Integrity will not be compromised. Publication of article that has no quality should be exterminated. Publication should reflect the mastery of intellectuals in their respective fields and be regarded as universal reference within the field,” he said.

The ministry will also increase the quality of research grants to ensure that knowledge transfer will occur, encourage translation of great works and the research will establish results that will resolve current community and national problems in a substantial manner. Lecturers who have been awarded research grants are encouraged to guide and finance their post-graduate candidates by appointing them as research assistants.

“For lecturers promotion, we will start moving towards using a big data-based system with artificial intelligence that will accommodate all efforts and contributions from lecturers to determine auto-promotion eligibility. The requirement to fill endless forms will cease,” he said.

The library will be a broad and borderless repository of knowledge and the communication system between libraries at all universities and access to external publications be improved.

“We are aiming to have public universities and the higher education sector be referred to by the global community. The process of internationalisation includes the effort to increase the number of foreign students coming to Malaysia to study in line with the vision of making Malaysia an international education hub, and building more branches of local universities abroad through the satellite university method,” he said.

To increase autonomy at universities, the ministry will reassess the key performance indicators (KPIs) of each faculty and repeal the one-size-fits-all KPIs. Universities will be divided into clusters to create synergy and collaboration to no longer move alone. Autonomy is given to universities and their clusters to determine their respective KPIs.

Empowering students at higher education institutions had been and would continue to be given emphasis, said Maszlee.

Dr Maszlee Malik speaking at the Education Minister’s Mandate 2019 ceremony in Universiti Putra Malaysia. PIC BY ROSELA ISMAIL

Among the first attempts was the abolition of Section 15(1)(c) of the Universities and University Colleges Act 1971, which restricts the involvement of students in political activities on campus. This cancellation is in line with the government’s intention to lower voters’ age limit to 18 years.

“In addition, through continuous collaboration with the administrators of public universities in the country, we are working to create a Students’ Union, which has long been buried in the history of the country. Through the union, students will have more roles, opportunities and responsibilities in the decision-making process at each university,” he said.

The third direction – collaboration – will see the ecosystem of intellectuals be made more vibrant.

“This can be done through a mentor-mentee relationship between senior professors and new lecturers to realise more schools of thoughts in their respective fields. In this case, the universities should not be alienated from the reality of life. To prepare our students to become public intellectuals to handle tasks as society’s troubleshooters, universities must create collaborations with all the appropriate parties, such as schools, polytechnics and vocational colleges. A lot can be done by public universities to help local communities, including giving training to improve the quality of the teaching and learning process in schools,” said Maszlee.

In addition, universities also need to collaborate with other parties to create endowment from the waqf and zakat institution, as well as alumni.

“Use tax incentives to activate financial endowment through alumni. The alumni of the public universities are also asked to return to their alma mater to help out as is the case with international leading universities,” Maszlee urged.

A more drastic and comprehensive internationalisation effort will be mobilised, he said.

“Most importantly, academics of the public university should be referred to internationally in their respective fields and no longer just be jaguh kampung. High-quality work must be produced and translated, and the process of translation must be actively executed; rebranding and marketing must be organised more effectively at the global level. We also need to increase the mobility of professors and staff outside the country as well as have more academics from overseas visiting and serving in our country,” he said.

As for TVET (Technical and Vocational Education and Training), he said the ministry would continue to improve institutional capabilities and systems of TVET to remain competitive and meet market expectations.

“The ministry will implement a harmonised accreditation system with quality assurance for enabling student mobility in TVET institutions, including those in the Malaysian Technical University Network (MTUN).

“MTUN should also be moving towards the Fachhochschule system in Germany and measured with the production of technical graduates and the resolution of technical issues, and not merely producing publications.

“We will improve the quality and delivery of TVET programmes to improve the skills of graduates through an industry-led approach, eliminating duplication of programmes and resource, increasing cost effectiveness, and expanding TVET funding to increase enrolment,” said Maszlee.

“At the same time, the ministry is in the process of resolving the issue of recognising qualification from vocational colleges that will allow them to have equal opportunity to pursue higher education.

“This requires that vocational colleges be placed parallel with the other institutions of TVET to be in line with the industry’s direction,” he said.

Polytechnics and community colleges will also not be left out from reformation efforts to be carried out this year.

“Networking and joint ventures between the two institutions with the industry, particularly big and renowned companies, is a priority to ensure the marketability of graduates in technical fields.

“The alignment between MTUN and polytechnics is aimed to ensure opportunities for polytechnic graduates to continue their education. Polytechnics and community colleges has also opened up opportunities for the tahfiz students to equip themselves with the skills for a career in life,” he said.

Maszlee said the ministry was serious in making TVET on a par with other choices; not a second or an alternative option.

Source: https://www.nst.com.my

TVET, a stepchild no more

Students of Politeknik Ungku Omar get hands on training on automotive engineering at the workshop at their campus in Ipoh.

Students of Politeknik Ungku Omar get hands on training on automotive engineering at the workshop at their campus in Ipoh.

A framework has been proposed to address the long-standing problems of our TVET system

A NEW framework for technical and vocational training is in the pipelines.

If approved, the proposal will see a more streamlined, effective, and industry-relevant, Technical and Vocational Education Training (TVET) system.

Proposed by the National TVET Movement to the Economic Planning Unit last month, the framework aims to address the country’s ailing TVET system.

“Our focus is on upper secondary school students. We want to create a TVET champion.

TVET students being trained to be industry-ready. — File photo

TVET students being trained to be industry-ready. — File photo

“We want students to have better access to choices between academics and something more hands-on like TVET. This is what’s happening in other countries,” said Ahmad Tajudin, who recently retired as the Education Ministry deputy director-general.

Among those part of the Movement are the Federation of Human Resources Ministry’s Department of Skills Development (JPK) Accredited Centres (FeMac), National Council of Professors, and the National Parent-Teacher Associations’ Vocational and Technical Consultative Council.

For too long, TVET has been the “troubled stepchild” of the education system, he said.

This framework tackles long-standing problems like the:

> Overlapping of programmes and certifications;

> Misguided focus on post-secondary TVET students instead of upper secondary students;

> Existence of multiple accreditation bodies and agencies implementing TVET;

> High operations cost resulting from the many ministries involved;

> Weak policies; and

> Private TVET providers being treated as competitors.

“All TVET institutions should be streamlined, rationalised, and consolidated, under the Education Ministry.

“This ensures that teachers and trainers are better taken care of under one scheme of service. And, there won’t be a need to close down any institutions if all facilities and resources are under one roof,” he said, adding that it would also be more cost effective for the Government while ensuring smoother communication between the industry and institutions.

Other reforms proposed by the Movement include:

> Reducing existing certifications to an important few;

> Having a single accreditation body for TVET;

> Establishing two educational pathways for students to choose from;

> Allowing industries to take the lead;

> Enhancing TVET apprenticeship programmes based on models from other developed countries; and

> Formulating policies and legislations to enhance careers in TVET.

Greater emphasis, and an overview, of TVET implementation is needed, Ahmad Tajudin said.

There should be training provisions to facilitate contributions from private TVET providers, and there must be closer collaboration between the industry and these providers.

“Our TVET system needs stronger institutional coordination, and greater transparency among the multiple public agencies.

“TVET restructuring is a small part of a holistic solution, but it’s a start to the reform,” he said, adding that strong political will from the Government was crucial to ensure the country’s TVET success.

Education Minister Dr Maszlee Malik said the Government would continue enhancing the capabilities of TVET institutions and systems to remain competitive and meet industry demands.

Speaking during his annual new year address in Serdang on Monday, he said the ministry would implement a harmonised accreditation and quality assurance system to enable student mobility in TVET institutions, which includes the Malaysian Technical University Network (MTUN).

The launch of Limkokwing TVET International, a TVET Malaysia Training Centre at Limkokwing University.MOHD SAHAR MISNI/The Star

The launch of Limkokwing TVET International, a TVET Malaysia Training Centre at Limkokwing University.MOHD SAHAR MISNI/The Star

MTUN, he said, should move in the direction of Fachhochschule – Germany’s tertiary education institution specialising in topical areas.

MTUN, he added, shouldn’t be evaluated solely based on publications, but also on the ability of the graduates produced to solve technical issues.

He said the ministry plans to increase the quality and delivery of TVET by enabling the industry to lead the curriculum development, avoid overlapping of programmes and resources, improve cost effectiveness, and widen the funding to increase enrolment.

He said the ministry was also in the midst of addressing recognition issues involving controversial vocational colleges.

He assured polytechnics and community colleges that they wouldn’t be sidelined in the reform process.

“To ensure the employability of our graduates, closer collaboration between these institutions and the industry – especially with the big players – will be prioritised,” he said, adding that these were part of the ministry’s efforts in making sure that TVET, polytechnics, vocational colleges, and community colleges, are no longer seen as second choice options.

In June last year, Dr Maszlee appointed Lembah Pantai MP Nurul Izzah Anwar to chair a special TVET task force.

The duties of the task force, said Dr Maszlee, was to conduct research across all ministries that provide TVET education and training, and recommend how the country’s TVET system can be improved. This includes a review of TVET education and training laws, and the possibility of a TVET commission.

However, the TVET industry was left reeling following Nurul Izzah’s resignation as PKR vice president on Dec 17, and her decision to no longer serve the federal government in any capacity.

“We’ll continue advocating for a sustainable and effective TVET implementation,” said Ahmad Tajudin.

Source: www.thestar.com.my

Comment: It’s good that the Ministry has identified the weaknesses & looking to implement the reforms (personally, I see that our TVET sector would soar to much greater heights compared to now, if reforms are implemented effectively & correctly).

But I have a doubt whether they would reform this particular weakness – Private TVET providers being treated as competitors.

It seems that there are plans to gradually “KILL” the private TVET providers based on their proposed plans (hearsay, so take it with a pinch of salt).


These include but not limited to:

1) Closing all TVET providers that are 2 stars and below after the impending 2019 star rating process (as early as March 2019). It generally affects the smaller private TVET providers who has very limited resources (manpower & finances) vs the public TVET institutions.
2) Closing/revoke Vocational Training Operation (VTO) programme of any private TVET institutions that has does not meet a min of 4 stars and above for that particular programme. Eventually, it would be just offered by the multiple satellite campuses of CIAST, nationwide,
3) Restrict the organising of the JPK’s various induction courses (PP-PPD-PPB, PP-PPT, PPL) to only  CIAST satellite campuses, nationwide.
4) and BEYOND – perhaps you can comment if you think what they are doing/planning to do is gonna KILL the private TVET providers.

What lies ahead in 2019 for higher education?

(File pix) Diversity and education for all.

WITH Pakatan Harapan’s victory in the May 9 general election last year, the education landscape saw the merging of the Education Ministry, once the caretaker of school-level matters, with the Higher Education Ministry under the leadership of Education Minister Dr Maszlee Malik.

The merger is the platform for the planning, implementation and management of strategies and operations, from pre-school to higher education and lifelong learning in a continuum.

Diversity and education for all is the ministry’s mission as evidenced by the June 2018 intake at public universities, polytechnics, community colleges and public skills training institutions.

Out of the intake of 182,409 post-sijil Pelajaran Malaysia (SPM) candidates, 17,338 places were offered to those from the B40 group, 299 to the disabled, 348 to Orang Asli and 1,225 to sports athletes. The trend of offering education opportunities at the tertiary level is expected to continue.

The education Ministry also pledged to make technical and vocational education and training (TVET) as students’ first choice of studies in the next five years.

Maszlee said TVET empowers every level of society towards equitable development, poverty reduction and economic prosperity.

However, several issues must be addressed, including strengthening the governance of TVET for better management, harmonising rating systems across both private and public TVET institutions, and enhancing the quality and delivery of TVET programmes to improve graduates’ employability.

The Budget 2019 speech revealed that the Education Ministry received the lion’s share with an allocation of RM60.2 billion, emphasising the critical importance of education for the nation’s progress.

The 2019 budget made substantial allocations for scholarships including a RM2.1 billion boost to the MARA education scholarships Programme and RM17.5 million over the next five years to the Malaysia Professional Accountancy centre (MyPAC) to produce more qualified bumiputera accountants.

Yayasan Peneraju Pendidikan Bumiputera received RM210 million for three of its programmes — Program Peneraju Tunas, Program Peneraju Skil (technical and vocational skills programmes) and Program Peneraju Professional (professional certifications in finance and accounting).

To ensure there are funds for those seeking to pursue tertiary studies, the national Higher Education Fund Corporation is reviewing its repayment mechanism.

Its chairman Wan Saiful Wan Jan said the review is expected to take six months before it is presented to the Cabinet for approval. The entity is actively holding meetings with various parties including community leaders, non-governmental organisations and other stakeholders to obtain relevant information and input before the draft is prepared.

With the abolishment of section 15(2)(c) of the universities and university colleges Act 1971 last month, students have the freedom to take part in politics on campus. This will further expose undergraduates to the democratic system and foster active participation in the governance of the country. Starting this year, student unions will be set up to develop students’ ability to manage their affairs on campus and empower them to lead the nation.

(File pix) Rahmah Mohamed, MQA chief executive officer

Enhancing the quality of education

As an education hub, Malaysia is a popular destination for local and international students because of the quality of academic programmes provided by higher education institutions in the country which are accredited by the Malaysian Qualifications Agency (MQA).

MQA chief executive officer Datuk Dr Rahmah Mohamed said its accreditation is widely accepted in Asia, New Zealand, Japan, Australia, United Kingdom and Europe.

“We are recognised as a global brand. If a student graduates from a MQA-accredited programme in Malaysia or a Malaysian institution, they can work in any of these countries,” she added.

For this year, MQA plans to train qualifications officers from countries which require accreditation of programmes such as the Pacific Islands and those emerging from war as well as nations which do not have such agencies.

It will also introduce standards for micro-credentials. Micro-credentialing is the process of earning a micro-credential, which is like a mini degree or certification in a specific topic. To earn a microcredential, you need to complete a certain number of activities, assessments or projects related to the topic “We are looking at enabling individuals to earn credits from short courses organised by higher education institutions, accumulating those credits and ending up with a diploma or degree,” added Rahmah.

“In today’s environment, universities cannot work on their own but need to collaborate. If they subscribe to the same set of standards, a course offered by X University for example can be recognised by University Y.

“And University Y can then offer another set of courses to help students accumulate more credits.

“MQA is always looking for academic products that can contribute to the adult environment. Micro-credentials help students learn and earn on they go.”

Micro-cedentials can be offered by both public and private institutions as long as they subscribe to MQA standards.

“We are targeting to have the standards in place within the first quarter of this year followed by a roadshow. I foresee the implementation of micro-credentials will be rolled out six months later.”

The Accreditation of Prior Experiential Learning – Qualification (APEL Q) is in the pipeline.

“APEL Q is still at the study stage. A person who has 20 years of work experience will sit a test and his portfolio will be assessed to determine an award of up to a master’s degree, without having to attend classes.”

MQA will conduct a pilot project after carrying out a feasibility study.

“When we roll it out, we will be the most advanced in Asia in terms of such qualifications.”

MQA believes there is a need to enhance the qualification of working adults without the need to be physically at university.

“We need to contribute to the advancement of the country and, to do this, we need to evolve and improve our stature in academics and education.

So, this is what MQA is striving for.”

Focus on skills

More often than not, SPM school-leavers who are not academically inclined are at a loss after getting their exam results.

Their results may not be up to mark to enable them to continue their studies at conventional higher education institutions and they may not even have an interest in academic pursuit. Without training and education, they may not have the skills for a bright future in the working world.

The Education Ministry’s Technical and Vocational Education Division encourages those who are not academically-inclined to pursue TVET as early as 16 years of age.

Division director Zainuren Mohd Nor sees 2019 as the year to strengthen and empower TVET.

The division runs three programmes: Kolej Vokasional (KV), Program Vokasional Menengah Atas (PVMA) and Perantisan Industri Menengah Atas (PIMA).

“The aim of KVs is to produce skilled workers who meet industry need or become entrepreneurs,” he said.

The aim is to get 70 per cent of its graduates employed, 20 per cent to continue studies and the remaining to become entrepreneurs.

“We have signed 775 memoranda of understanding for on-the-job training with the industry. We collaborate with the industry to produce students with skills required by the Industry Revolution 4.0 (IR4.0). We also partner with TVET colleges from, for example, Korea, China and Italy to gain exposure,” he added.

“Diploma Vokasional Malaysia graduates with a 3.5 CGPA can opt for higher studies. Or they can gain work experience and then opt for APEL Q.

“Budding entrepreneurs can enrol in the School Enterprise programme. They can set up their businesses during studies with the help of Companies Commission of Malaysia and relevant cooperatives.”

KV graduates are awarded the diploma as well as Malaysia Skills certificate. Some 96.7 per cent of the 2017 cohort are employed. As of Press time, the statistics for 2018 were unavailable.

As demand for places at vocational colleges is overwhelming, those who opt for TVET education can do so by joining the PVMA programme at day schools. They will be awarded two certificates — SPM and Malaysian Skills Certificate.

“They sit for only three SPM papers — Bahasa Malaysia, English and History — which qualify them to apply for places at vocational institutions.

They will also be awarded the Malaysia Skills Certificate Level 2 which certifies them as partially skilled and they can gain employment or become entrepreneurs.”

Last year, 269 schools ran PVMA programmes with an increase to 350 this year.“PIMA offers potential school dropouts a chance to learn and earn. They are in school for two days to learn SPM Bahasa Malaysia, English and History, and spend three days working in the industry. Some 116 schools were involved in 2018 while the number is increased to 200 this year.”

Students will be awarded a SPM certificate as well as a letter of testimony from employers.

The State Education Department and the District Education Office select the schools which carry out this programme subject to the availability of the industry in the vicinity of the school. Students, who are selected by school counsellors, get an allowance from the industry and will be monitored by it.

In the Sistem Latihan Dual Nasional programme, students learn at school for six months and attend industry training for another six months.

“I urge society to change its perception of TVET and encourage more industry players to partner with us to develop TVET.

“We want the industry to provide student placements, taking on a corporate social responsibility approach. The industry can provide facilities and equipment to ensure training is in line with IR4.0.

“Students too need to change their mindset from just being an employee to that of an entrepreneur.”

(File pix) Raja Azura Raja Mahayuddin


Scholarships

The allocation of RM17.5 million over the next five years to MyPAC will go towards its target to produce 600 Bumiputera professional accountants, said its chief executive officer Datuk Zaiton Mohd Hassan.

There are plans to boost Bumiputera education through sponsorship programmes, including collaborating with institutions which provide scholarships specifically for Bumiputeras, particularly students from B40 families, to pursue professional accountancy qualifications.

MyPAC was established in 2015, in collaboration with Yayasan Peneraju, to increase the number of certified Bumiputera accountants.

It aims to create the opportunity and provide the ecosystem for those with the capability and ambition to obtain a professional accountancy qualification.

Through the scholarship programmes, the number of graduates has risen from only two in 2015 to 141 last year, with 2,154 full-time scholars, and 2,654 current scholars.

Nor Dalina Abdullah, one of the earliest recipients of MyPAC scholarship, said she got to know of MyPAC in 2015, which allowed her to complete her ACCA examinations in the same year.

“The scholarship provided me with the means to continue my ACCA education. Its support was instrumental in my passing the examinations,” said Nor Dalina, who works as an analyst at Baker Hughes, a General Electric Company. Her role requires her to interact with her colleagues of different rank, including those in other countries.

“As a founding member of MyPAC Accountants Club, I hope to contribute back especially to MyPAC’s Outreach programme to inspire potential candidates in the fulfilling career as a professional accountant,” she added.

Meanwhile, Muhammad Shafiq Mohd Yusof, Muhammad Hakimie Mat Hat Hassan and Ahmad Fauzee Mohd Hassan attribute their success to Yayasan Peneraju’s three key thrusts—Peneraju Tunas, Peneraju Skil and Peneraju Profesional programmes.

Muhammad Shafiq, from a B40 family in Perak, pursued studies at a private university with aid from Yayasan Peneraju, and he works at a multinational corporation with an average salary of above RM5,000 a month. Muhammad Hakimie, from Terengganu, is trained and certified as a welder, with a salary of RM9,000 while Ahmad Fauzee, who is pursuing the ACCA qualification, ranked first in the world for a subject he took as part of the professional certification syllabus.

Yayasan Peneraju chief executive Raja Azura Raja Mahayuddin said a structured scholarship and development programme allows individuals to further studies without financial worries.

“Yayasan Peneraju is thankful for the government’s trust in its efforts in empowering the education of youth especially those from lower income households.

“We are committed to strengthening the Bumiputera community in response to the government’s call to sustain and empower education and human capital.”

As at December 2018, the foundation has helped 23,000 people benefit from education, TVET training (and employment) and professional certification funding and development programmes.

With an allocation of RM210 million under the 2019 Budget, the foundation will be offering more than 7,000 new opportunities this year, including focus of existing programmes on certifications in technology-related fields, professional accreditation programmes for accounting and finance, and a new initiative — Khaira Ummah — for those from religious and tahfiz schools.

There is also the Super High-Income Programme to increase the number of Bumiputeras who earn a monthly income of RM20,000 in specialised and niche fields.

The foundation will focus on target groups — 1,500 youths from challenging socio-economic background with average-to-excellent academic results (Peneraju Tunas); 4,000 dropouts, non-academically-inclined, unemployed youths and low skilled/semi-skilled workforce (Peneraju Skil); as well as 1,600 new and existing workforce including SPM and university graduates, who are aspiring to be specialists (Peneraju Profesional).

Out of the 1,600, it will groom 1,000 professional accountants, chartered financial analysts and financial risk managers annually.

A new programme, Peneraju Tunas Kendiri, which provides opportunities for the disabled, will be introduced this year.

Khaira Ummah will start with two programmes — Huffaz Pintar (SPM fast track) and Huffaz Skil.

“We want to open up career pathways to these group of students through academic courses and technical and vocational education or even to those who aspire to be professionals.”

The Health Ministry has an allocation of RM250 million worth of scholarships for medical doctors, paramedics (including medical assistants), nurses and medical students.

Some 40 per cent RM100 million) is allocated for 1,100 doctors per year (compared to 1,000 in the previous years) to pursue master’s degree in various disciplines.

The ministry spokesperson said about 12,000 medical college students will attend basic paramedic courses and 9,000 nurses will continue post-basic nursing programmes.

There are a variety of master’s degree programmes in medicine and health, including Science/Clinical, Research, Education and Public Health at local universities.

In Malaysia, a master’s degree in medicine and healthcare is a stepping stone to a career in medicine (as a doctor) or an alternative career in another aspect of the field.

Resilience

Looking forward, Raja Azura applauded the government’s efforts in equipping the nation’s future generations with quality education.

The challenge is keeping up with technological advancements and embracing IR4.0 so as not to be left behind.

“Employers’ expectations of employees have moved towards technology-savvy communication skills, which in turn, require tertiary institutions to impart such abilities to students.

“I am hopeful that the higher education can prepare future generations to face IR4.0, which will impact all economies, industries and society at its core.

“It may very well challenge fundamental ideas about what it means to be human as it is slowly blurring the line between the physical, digital and biological, and changing the way we interact with emerging digital technology such as artificial intelligence, analytics and the Internet of Things.”

Raja Azura lauds the spirit of learnability and resilience.

“This is the desire and ability to quickly grow and adapt to remain relevant as people who are willing to learn will be agile and are versatile. They will also rank higher on the employability scale in today’s dynamic world.”

Zaiton of MyPAC hopes universities will encourage Bachelor in Accountancy graduates to pursue professional accountancy qualifications as they are only required to pass four ACCA papers, for example.

Source: www.nst.com.my

Comments: 
1) What’s the point that the programs are accredited by MQA, recognised by many countries in the world but many of the local graduates are unemployed, mainly due to poor command of English language & the syllabus is so out of date and not relevant to the industry (same problem with TVET education system as well, most TVET institutions don’t produce graduates that matches the industry’s needs)

2) Introducing micro-credentials in the academic world is a great idea, it’s similar to TVET’s system where students/candidates can just go for certain Competency Units (CU) and upon obtaining all CU in that particular program, they can be awarded a Malaysian Skill Certificate (MSC) or more well known as Sijil Kemahiran Malaysia (SKM)

3) Accreditation of Prior Experiential Learning – Qualification (APEL Q) is another great system that allows experienced workers that didn’t go through formal education to obtain their Diploma, Degree, Masters or even PhD. However, devils is in the details. It maybe subject to manipulation by certain parties for quick & easy profit.
APEL Q is just like Pengiktirafan Pencapaian Terdahulu (PPT) in our TVET context. Unfortunately, I’ve received feedbacks on how some of these candidates (with the help of CONnsultants created fake evidences & managed to obtain their SKM certificate via the PPT method.
Besides that, can you imagine someone that has >10 SKM qualifications under his/her belt? And it can be so diverse from each other, eg having SKM in aesthetic, hairdressing, massage, aromatherapy, make-up (this group can be quite related to each other) AND culinary, office management and GOD knows what else!
Last heard the Department of Skill Development (DSD or better known as JPK) is checking on this & will take action. Haizz, always after nasi sudah jadi bubur.

4) Diploma Vokasional Malaysia graduates with a 3.5 CGPA can opt for higher studies
– What about Diploma Kemahiran Malaysia (DKM) & Diploma Lanjutan Kemahiran Malaysia (DLKM) graduates from the TVET stream? My understanding is that thus far, only graduates from selected programs like engineering based programs can further study to selected public local higher institutions (IPTA) which are collectively known as MTUN (Malaysian Technical University Network)

5) With the increase of more & more PVMA, private TVET providers are advised not to run the same program as these PVMA’s, especially if you’re tartgeting the same group of students (mainly the B40). Many private TVET providers are already crying for help due to lower number of students registration from this group of students, coupled with the dwindling funding/financing by Perbadanan Tabung Pembangunan Kemahiran (PTPK)

 

 

Degree level studies for TVET diploma holders

Deputy Energy, Technology, Science, Climate Change and Environment Minister Isnaraissah Munirah Majilis (fifth from left) with Malaysia Board of Technologists (MBOT) president Tan Sri Ahmad Zaidee Laidin (fourth from left) and Deputy Human Resources Minister Datuk Mahfuz Omar in a group picture to commemorate the signing of the memorandum of understanding between MBOT and the Technology Expert Panel in Putrajaya.
Pix by Ahmad Irham Mohd Noor

TECHNICAL and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) diploma holders will soon have the opportunity to study at the bachelor’s degree level in four universities under the Malaysian Technical University Network (MTUN), creating better career opportunities for their future.

This follows the exchange of 21 memoranda of understanding (MoUs) between the Malaysia Board of Technologists (MBOT) with the Technology Expert Panel (TEP), a strategic alliance between three sectors, namely government agencies, industry and the academia, under the purview of the Human Resource Ministry, Energy, Technology, Science, Climate Change and Environment Ministry, and Education Ministry, in Putrajaya last week.

Deputy Human Resources Minister Datuk Mahfuz Omar said the initiative will look at existing gaps that TVET graduates face in terms of qualifications to enable them to further their studies at Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia, Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Melaka, Universiti Malaysia Pahang and Universiti Malaysia Perlis.

“What seems to be the problem for most TVET diploma holders is that they don’t have the necessary Sijil Pelajaran Malaysia credits required by MTUN for entry. We hope to prepare students at TVET colleges with the necessary requirements before they apply to enter MTUN universities,” he said.

However, Mahfuz said, even if TVET diploma holders did not further their studies at universities, they will have the advantage of being recognised as professional technologists and certified technicians.

“We must explore collaborations with international bodies so that our TVET graduates will not only have certificates from Malaysia but also be internationally certified.

That way, they can either work abroad or gain better positions when foreign investors come to Malaysia through recognition accorded,” he added.

MBOT, the professional body that gives professional recognition to technologists and technicians in related technology and technical fields, has already embarked on the articulation process to enable TVET diploma holders to bridge the gap towards the bachelor’s degree level education, said its president, Tan Sri Ahmad Zaidee Laidin.

“The process entails matching the courses, requirements and coursework at vocational colleges with that at higher education institutions. This will ensure that courses the students complete will not have to be repeated at the institution to which they are transferring”, said Zaidee.

He said MBOT has signed an MoU with Education Ministry’s Malaysian Qualifications Agency to facilitate the process for the MTUN initiative.

“On the private higher education side, UniKL is already working with MBOT to facilitate entry of technologists and technicians into their degree courses,” he said.

Mahfuz said in supporting the country’s aspiration towards Industrial Revolution 4.0, MBOT is seen as a dynamic and flexible professional body and most relevant platform to leverage expertise and skills from various areas of technology under its wings.

“This advance technological elements are pervasively embedded into the TVET curricular right up to the technological practicing provision, to add value to the various booming industrial sectors in Malaysia,” he said.

At the MoU exchange, among the TEP panel members that were represented were CyberSecurity Malaysia, DRB-Hicom University of Automotive Malaysia. Allied Aeronautics Training Centre Sdn Bhd, Mara Corporation, the Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport and Federation of Malaysian Skills Development Centres.

Also present was Deputy Energy, Technology, Science, Climate Change and Environment Minister Isnaraissah Munirah Majilis.

Source: https://www.nst.com.my

KOLEJ VOKASIONAL MELAHIRKAN PEKERJA BERKEMAHIRAN & MEMBINA ‘BUSINESS LEGACY’

Keputusan Peperiksaan PT3 baru sahaja berlalu. Saya yakin dan percaya, calon calon telah berpuas hati denganhasil pencapaian mereka setelah 3 tahun berhempas pulas dalam mencari dan menghasilkan kejayaan. Tidak ketinggalan terdapat juga air mata ibu bapa yang mengalir kerana kejayaan anak anak mereka.

Sebagai seorang guru, PT3 bagi saya merupakan satu cara menghalakan pelajar ke bidang yang di minati mereka. Pentaksiran PT3 adalah berdasarkan penilaian dalaman. Ini bermaksud guru guru sendiri yang menilai calon calon ini dan dalam masa yang sama bimbingan diberi sepenuh jiwa

Adik saya merupakan pelajar cemerlang PT3 2016 di SMK TALIB KARIM, Alor Gajah, Melaka. keputusannya untuk ke KV sangat memeranjatkan saya. Pada awalnya memang saya tidak setuju dia melanjutkan pelajarnnya di KV atas beberapa perkara.

Kini beliau sedang mengikuti Program KV dalam bidang KULINARI.

Antara perkara utama yang saya tidak setuju dia ke KV ialah, Pelajar lepasan Kolej Vokasional (KV) tidak layak melanjutkan pengajian ke peringkat ijazah sarjana muda meskipun mempunyai Diploma Vokasional Malaysia (DVM) kerana universiti awam (UA) tidak mengiktiraf diploma terbabit.

Antara perkara utama yang saya tidak setuju dia ke KV ialah, Pelajar lepasan Kolej Vokasional (KV) tidak layak melanjutkan pengajian ke peringkat ijazah sarjana muda meskipun mempunyai Diploma Vokasional Malaysia (DVM) kerana universiti awam (UA) tidak mengiktiraf diploma terbabit.

Rangkaian Universiti Teknikal Malaysia (MTUN), iaitu

1) Universiti Malaysia Perlis (UNIMAP)
2) Universti Teknikal Malaysia (UTeM)
3) Universiti Malaysia Pahang (UMP)
4) Universiti Tun Hussein onn (UTHM)
menetapkan antara syarat kelayakan untuk memasuki program ijazah sarjana muda ialah mempunyai Sijil Pelajaran Malaysia (SPM), namun graduan DVM tidak menduduki peperiksaan itu.

Ini kerana pelajar terbabit memasuki KV menggunakan keputusan Pentaksiran Tingkatan 3 (PT3) dan mengikuti kursus kemahiran itu selama empat tahun tanpa perlu menduduki SPM untuk memperoleh DVM.

Tetapi ini bukan masalah yang besar. saya percaya aliran KV ini merupakan aliran yang baru. Carta alirnya tidak sama seperti pelajar yang ambil akademik sepenuhnya seperti SPM.

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CARTA ALIR KV – IBU BAPA & CALON KV PERLU TAHU !
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Pelajar KV mempunyai perjalanan mereka tersendiri. Perjalanan mereka amat berbeza dengan pelajar akademik. Bagi saya mana mana pilihan mempunyai risiko. Jika ambil jalan SPM tapi malas belajar, apa gunanya. Betul tak ?

Persoalannya bagaimana pelajar KV ingin teruskan pengajian mereka ke peringkat seterusnya ?. Graduan Kolej Vokasional (KV) perlu memenuhi beberapa kriteria ditetapkan Kementerian Pendidikan Tinggi (KPT) untuk membolehkan mereka melanjutkan pengajian ke peringkat Ijazah Sarjana Muda.

Antara kriteria itu ialah:

* Mempunyai pengalaman bekerja selama dua tahun untuk mendapat Sijil Program Akreditasi Pembelajaran Berasaskan Pengalaman Terdahulu (APEL), atau

* Memiliki kelayakan Sijil Vokasional Malaysia (SVM) yang sudah disetarakan oleh Lembaga Peperiksaan (LP) kepada Sijil Pelajaran Malaysia (SPM) 3 kredit, iaitu memperoleh Purata Nilai Gred Keseluruhan (PNGK) Akademik: 3.33; PNGK Vokasional: 3.67; kepujian dalam Bahasa Melayu dan kompeten semua Modul Vokasional.

Selepas memperoleh keputusan itu, graduan KV perlu mendapat kelulusan khas daripada KPT sehingga akreditasi penuh program diploma diperoleh.

Maka di sini, pelajar perlu tahu perjalanan mereka dan visualkan ke mana aku selepas ini dan apa yang aku nak capai ?

Bila anda visualkan perjalanan anda, barulah anda nampak jalan dan keyakinan akan menjelma bagi mendorong diri anda menuju kejayaan.

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KELEBIHAN KV
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Kementerian Pendidikan dalam kenyataannya berkata, 83.1 peratus graduan KV mendapat pekerjaan mengikut bidang pilihan dalam tempoh tiga bulan selepas graduasi, sekali gus membuktikan mereka menerima pengiktirafan daripada industri.

Kementerian itu menekankan Transformasi Pendidikan Vokasional (TPV) bertujuan mengarusperdana pendidikan vokasional setanding dengan aliran pendidikan perdana.

Pengarah Bahagian Pendidikan Teknik dan Vokasional (BPTV), Zainuren Mohd Nor, berkata kira-kira 83 peratus daripada 2,273 pelajar lepasan KV berjaya memperoleh pekerjaan dalam bidang berkaitan sebaik tamat pengajian, Disember lalu.

Katanya, data yang direkodkan oleh KV itu adalah berdasarkan pelajar kohort pertama yang sudah memperoleh Diploma Vokasional Malaysia (DVM) pada 2016.

Beliau berkata, jumlah tinggi pelajar KV yang diterima bekerja dalam tempoh dua bulan selepas tamat pengajian menunjukkan kursus ditawarkan KV memenuhi kehendak industri.

“Jumlah graduan DVM yang mendapat pekerjaan adalah lebih tinggi berbanding sasaran awal yang ditetapkan iaitu sebanyak 70 peratus bekerja, 20 peratus menyambung pengajian ke peringkat lebih tinggi dan 10 peratus lagi menjadi usahawan.

“Bagaimanapun, data yang diperoleh menunjukkan perkembangan memberangsangkan apabila 83 peratus pelajar ditawarkan bekerja oleh pihak industri dan ini membuktikan kursus kemahiran di KV menepati matlamat penubuhan KV iaitu melahirkan tenaga kerja mahir,” katanya

Dengan kata lain , saya dapat ringkaskan kelebihan KV ;

1. Lebih fokuskan pelajar ke arah apa yang diminati

2. Pertingkatkan kemahiran yang ada pada pelajar sehingga capai kepada berkemahiran tinggi (pakar)

3. Kemahiran yang ditawarkan di KV merupakan permintaan TINGGI dalam pelbagai industri di Malaysia

4. Pelajar KV mudah membawa diri kerana mereka lebih praktikal

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KESIMPULAN
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Akhir kata sebagai seorang guru, saya dapati prog KV ini sangat bagus bagi pelajar yang ingin ke hadapan dalam dunia kemahiran dan praktikal.

Jika di zaman saya, Nilai dan kuantiti A dipandang tinggi. Tetapi bila di universiti plagiat dia lahh ‘hero’ nya. Suruh buat presentation terketar ketar. Akhirnya ilmu sebagai teori sahaja. Ijazah yang utama. janji grade.

Setelah tamat Ijazah ke hulur ke hilir bawa ijazah untuk mohon kerja. Online sana online sini mohon kerja. Bila tak dapat kerja barulah nak belajar jual burger, atau apa apa berkaitan kemahiran atau praktikal.

Tetapi tidak bidang atau program KV. program ini sangat menarik kerana menyediakan dari awal bagaimana nak teruskan kehidupan dalam dunia yang penuh pancaroba ini dan ekonomi tak menentu.

Yang pasti calon KV dan ibu ayah perlu hadam dan fahamkan perjalanan calon KV agar di pertengahan tiada penyesalan dan di akhir pengajian tiada kehampaan.

KREDIT: MOHD FADHLI BIN OTHMAN