Tag Archives: MTUN

Govt wants parents to erase negative perception against TVET

KUALA LUMPUR: The negative perception that Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) is a second choice for weak students compared to conventional academic field should be eliminated by parents, said Deputy Human Resources Minister, Datuk Mahfuz Omar (pix).

He said parents should place more confidence and support on their children taking TVET as this field is capable of producing the local manpower needed by the industry and nation to face Industrial Revolution 4.0 (IR4.0).

“The government sees it (TVET) as a necessity. Those who hold diplomas in skills are eligible to continue their education at degree level through Universiti Teknikal Malaysia (MTUN) network project.

“The move is seen as giving confidence to the people in TVET,” he told a question and answer session at Dewan Rakyat here today.

Mahfuz was replying to a supplementary question by Datuk Seri Ismail Abd Muttalib (BN-Maran) on the statistics of TVET student intake which is still low compared to developed countries such as Germany, Holland and Australia and wanted to know what are the measures taken towards empowering the field.

To empower TVET, Mahfuz said via a 2025 plan under the National Skills Development Council which involved six ministries, his ministry is also focusing on TVET Tahfiz programme as the first step to extend skills training to young Tahfiz students.

“We want to ensure Tahfiz students also have a future to enter the employment sector,” he said.

Mahfuz said he had held a meeting with Kedah State Islamic Religious Council recently which was attended by 70 Tahfiz centre representatives to discuss the government’s plan for Tahfiz TVET

Source: Bernama

Comment: Besides technical bachelors (Bachelor of Technology), TVET graduates with SKM2, SKM3 or DKM will also have a chance to obtain an executive bachelor in industrial management in a much shorter time frame (9 months) under the URise program that’s being offered by Universiti Tun Abdul Razak, KL together with ISE Education Sdn Bhd.
URise program has been specially designed for TVET graduates, hence need not worry that it’s too academic & tough.
Blended learning is implemented (online & offline learning at the University) to move with times.
*KWSP withdrawal can be done, on top of other payment options like credit card & the latest e-wallets.

Submit Your Interest Here

UMP to lead in TVET education

KUANTAN: The sky is the limit for Universiti Malaysia Pahang (UMP). Ranked among the top 800 best universities in the world based on the QS World University Rankings (WUR) 2020, UMP is aiming to become a leader in Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) in the country.

Last year, it emerged as the first local technical and non-research university to receive the prestigious QS 5-star overall rating award.

UMP Vice-Chancellor Professor Dr Wan Azhar Wan Yusoff said the university had become a platform to produce a well-trained technical workforce with skills that catered to the future.

This was attributed to the varsity being part of the Malaysian Technical University Network (MTUN) alongside Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia, Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Melaka and Universiti Malaysia Perlis.

“UMP is strengthening its high-end TVET and moving forward to emerge as the pinnacle for TVET education. We are moving towards producing a home-grown workforce that caters to the challenges of the Fourth Industrial Revolution,” he said.

“One is not required to be smart, but skilful and multitalented. It is about learning specific skills through repetitive practice on different equipment, machines or systems.

“We want the public, especially parents, to give importance to TVET as some view it as a back-up option for their children. MTUN helps graduates to become more capable at sophisticated tasks, which will be required for the future job market.”

Wan Azhar said UMP would be offering a Bachelor of Engineering Technology (Railway Maintenance) programme to cater to the burgeoning sector.

“As long as there are trains in the country, we will require railway maintenance technologists. We cannot remove these railway infrastructures, so we have to produce a skilled workforce for this sector.”

Dr Wan Azhar Wan Yusoff

In a move to bring out the best of TVET, UMP will carry out a minor restructuring exercise in its campuses in Gambang and Pekan next year.

Wan Azhar said the Gambang campus would be renamed the UMP College of Engineering and College of Management and Humanities, while the Pekan campus would be renamed the College of Engineering Technology and College of Computing and Science.

“We have equipment and facilities in Pekan, and this allows our students to be hands-on when it comes to TVET. UMP Pekan will serve as a technology campus and this is part of our efforts to achieve our goals in TVET.”

Wan Azhar said UMP’s Graduate Employability was ranked at 96 per cent, which was well above the 80 per cent benchmark set by the Education Ministry.

UMP graduates are able to secure employment with companies that have business links with Germany following an academic collaboration for a postgraduate degree in mechanical engineering and automotive engineering with the Karlsruhe University of Applied Sciences (HsKA).

UMP Chancellor Yang di-Pertuan Agong Al-Sultan Abdullah Ri’ayatuddin Al-Mustafa Billah Shah will be presenting the scrolls to graduates at the 14th UMP convocation today.

A total of 3,778 graduates will receive their scrolls during the two-day ceremony.

The event will be historic as Tan Sri Dr Abi Musa Asaari Mohamed Nor will be proclaimed as UMP’s pro-chancellor, while HeiTech Padu Bhd executive chairman Datuk Seri Mohd Hilmey Mohd Taib will receive an Honorary Doctorate of Philosophy in Information Technology.

Source: https://www.nst.com.my/

Comment: You may read here on what other Bachelor of Technology that other MTUN has to offer.

Youth and Sports Ministry enters agreement with TVET players

Youth and Sports Minister Syed Saddiq Syed Abdul Rahman speaks during the launch of SKIL'19 skill symposium in Putrajaya October 24, 2019. ― Picture by Shafwan Zaidon
Youth and Sports Minister Syed Saddiq Syed Abdul Rahman speaks during the launch of SKIL’19 skill symposium in Putrajaya October 24, 2019. ― Picture by Shafwan Zaidon
More skilled and high-paying jobs need to be created for TVET graduates, says minister

PUTRAJAYA, Oct 24 — The Youth and Sports Ministry today exchanged Statements of Understandings with five entities aimed at forging stronger cooperation between the public and private sectors in developing the Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) industry.

Witnessed by Youth and Sports Minister Syed Saddiq Abdul Rahman, the statements would see the entities play an active role in increasing career opportunities within the sector by offering spots for education and training, while offering technical advice to the ministry.

Among the signatories were Volvo Malaysia Sdn Bhd, Sapura Secured Technologies Companies, Malaysia Industry Association, the Malaysian Resources Corporation Berhad, with the cooperation of the Malaysian Prison Department.

Syed Saddiq later stressed the importance of offering former juveniles and minor crime offenders a second chance to reassimilate into society, saying one solution would be to retrain and up-skill them in opportunities within the TVET industry.

“For those who have been categorised as Individuals Under Observation, Henry Gurney leavers, we will give them a special route for them to be trained so in the end, despite them having a record, but they would be trained, re-skilled and up-skilled.

Henry Gurney Schools were set up under the Juvenile Courts Act 1947 to care for young offenders and provide formal education and rehabilitation for juvenile inmates.

“In the end they are able to be placed in companies that we share a relationship with for the TVET program,” he said after launching the SKIL 19’ Skills Symposium at the Youth and Sports Ministry Podium hall this morning.

Syed Saddiq said this and other efforts would be part of his ministry’s two pronged program, MyFuture Youth and MyFuture Youth Plus, aimed at offering reactive programs for former offenders, and proactive programs for youth who are classified within the risky category.

“For those who are in danger of falling into the group of high risk youths, we will put them through an early intervention program with special routes into TVET programmes.

“There will be long and short courses, and in the end they will be offered a job,” he explained.

He also mentioned the importance of the government’s willingness to accept former offenders into the public service, saying such steps have been brought to the attention of the Cabinet.

The Muar MP also revealed amendments to public service requirements are currently being worked out by the Chief Secretary that will see a leeway be added to consider former offenders to enter the civil service.

“This is important because if we see for those who have been jailed before, and those from Henry Gurney, about 50 to 60 per cent are youth, and a majority of them have committed minor crimes.

“But, because they don’t have targeted assistance, and if we forget or sideline them, they will go back into the community and society where their family also does not take them seriously, and not have a job, no direction in their life.

“If we (the government) are also not willing to help out, in the end they will reoffend and reenter into the same system,” he said.

Syed Saddiq stressed on the importance of breaking their cycle of crime and to offer them a second chance to assimilate back into and be a useful member of a developing society.

Additionally, the minister also added how the negative and derogatory perception towards the TVET industry should stop, and instead instil the culture of treating them as equals on par with graduates from public universities.

“If we see in Germany, the youth there are educated from a young age to understand that TVET is on par with those from public universities.

“In Malaysia, we have to instil this culture into the hearts and minds of the youth, and also the parents, as this is important to ensure that TVET will always be one of the most important growth sectors in the new Malaysia.

“But realising that dream would be impossible without the close cooperation between industry players,” he added.

Source: https://www.malaymail.com & https://www.staronline.com

Comment: Despite facts & figures showing that TVET graduates have high employability (Eg 83% for Kolej Vokasional graduates), it will still take very long time for the society to change their negative perception towards TVET.

Well, why is that so? Among them, not limited to:

1. Most of the those that took up
TVET courses are because they are academically poor & have no where to go (minority do have good academic grades too)
2. TVET jobs are generally low paying, especially in the initial years.
However, with
recognised certification, experience & good communication + people skills, income can reach 5 figures, eg like chefs, underwater welder, piping expert (O&G industry) or operating own business like dressmaking, hairdressing & beauty salon, automotive workshops.
3.
Lack of coordination between TVET institutions and industry on industrial needs also produced mismatch skills of TVET graduates, hence lower pay.

Solutions?

1. It’s ok if you, as a TVET graduate that doesn’t have SPM or fared poorly in academics, you’re now given a second chance to further to University for tertiary studies.
You may either pursue technical (Bachelor of Technology with Malaysian Technical University Network) or management related (Professional Diploma or Executive Bachelor) qualifications.
2. If you’re in the TVET industry without proper certification, you should consider to get your skills recognised via the Pengiktirafan Pencapaian Terdahulu (PPT/RPEL).
3. If you’re planning to study TVET courses, advisable to register at those that offers recognised certification like Sijil Kemahiran Malaysia (SKM), which are also warmly welcomed in many foreign countries for employment.

Public universities reassess offerings to match job opportunities

Courses at universities must keep abreast with market developments and waves of change. -NSTP/Muhd Asyraf Sawal.By Rozana Sani – October 16, 2019 @ 5:17pm

A recent news article citing a list of programmes to be dropped at public universities has raised concern among many quarters.

Students currently pursuing courses involved and their parents were particularly anxious about the status of the said programmes that will no longer be offered by public universities in the country.

Higher Education director-general Datin Paduka Dr Siti Hamisah Tapsir was quoted as saying that the department has asked all universities to identify and reshape their academic programmes to enhance students’ job opportunities and be in line with industry needs.

The idea behind the move is essentially to revise strategically and systematically what are currently offered at universities to keep abreast with change and market developments or risk stagnation.

Malaysian Institute of Accountants (MIA) chief executive officer Dr Nurmazilah Mahzan.

As one of the industry voices — Malaysian Institute of Accountants (MIA) chief executive officer Dr Nurmazilah Mahzan ― puts it: “If universities offer courses that are not in demand by industry, there will be a mismatch between demand and supply of labour; this in turn could affect graduate employability and, ultimately, overall economic and social sustainability and wellbeing.”

She said courses offered at universities should be periodically reviewed, revised or improved where possible to produce marketable graduates who can contribute to business, economic and social development.

So how are public universities reacting to this directive and how are they going about the selection process?

CONTINUOUS EXERCISE

Curriculum review and reassessing of programme offerings are the norm among public universities, said spokespersons approached by Higher ED.

Universiti Malaysia Kelantan (UMK) vice-chancellor Professor Dr Noor Azizi Ismail pointed out that the process started in 2017 when a team of professors were assigned to study the relevancy of programmes offered by local higher education institutions (HEIs).

“At universities, we have a Board of Studies which sits down before any programmes are offered and we are required to review all programmes every three to five years. But now because things change so fast, I would recommend a review be done every three years,” he said.

Universiti Malaysia Kelantan (UMK) vice-chancellor Professor Dr Noor Azizi Ismail.

At UMK, Noor Azizi said the engagement and involvement of the industry in the development and updating of programmes is key, apart from data from various analyses.

All decisions have to go through the Senate, Board of Directors, the Malaysia Qualification Agencies (MQA), Industry Advisory Panels (IAP) and the Education Ministry.

“Relevance in the context of past, current and future scenario, particularly in the context of IR4.0, are looked at. Data such as demand for the programmes, graduate employability (GE), future demands, national interest and so forth, as well as input from various agencies/industries are also taken into consideration,” he said.

As a result of the discussions carried out by UMK, for example, low value programmes that are important for nation-building such as history and heritage were suggested to be combined with other programmes such as history with law, and heritage with information technology (IT).

“Programmes with low GE such as very specialised science programmes like maths can be combined with economics and physics with computer science to make them more applied and relevant.

“Even Islamic programmes are embedded with science and technology such as biotech to make graduates ready for the halal industry. Based on the findings, we are taking the necessary action,” he said.

Engagement with industry leaders is crucial for the development of university programmes. Seen here is Tony Fernandes, chief executive officer of Air Asia Group at an executive talk held in Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin. – NSTP/Ghazali Kori

Universiti Malaysia Terengganu (UMT) deputy vice-chancellor (Academic & International) Professor Dr Noor Azuan Abu Osman said when any curriculum review is done, apart from benchmarking with similar top programmes, market survey, report from industry as external reviewer, needs of stakeholders and the current requirements in the related field are the compulsory parameters set by the Department of Higher Education (JPT).

“From the analyses, we will decide either to change the programme to industry mode as regulated by JPT, to fully overhaul the curriculum, or to hold its offer for the next intake of students. The decision is made by the Senate of UMT, upon thorough evaluation by MQA before it is endorsed by JPT,” he said.

Universiti Teknologi Mara (UiTM), meanwhile, stated that it takes a number of factors into consideration in addressing or identifying whether a course (or a set of courses) is irrelevant to current industry needs.

“The decision to cease the offering of a programme is not taken lightly and various factors are considered. One example of this exercise is with the development of the Academic Program Competitive Index (IDSPA), a mechanism to measure the relevance and sustainability of an academic programme,” said UiTM deputy vice-chancellor (Academic and International) Professor Dr Mohamad Kamal Harun.

Among the parameters measured by IDSPA are graduate employability, the popularity of the programmes, student enrolment, trends and needs of the programme(s) and the demand of the programmes based on data of the national and global workforce.

UiTM deputy vice-chancellor (Academic and International) Professor Dr Mohamad Kamal Harun.

Mohamad Kamal said the index indicates the possibility of whether a programme needs to be rebranded or cease to be offered. The justification for a programme to be deemed irrelevant is carefully negotiated and reviewed.

The deleted programmes at UiTM may be rebranded, replaced or combined with new relevant programmes, said Mohamad Kamal.

“The need to enhance the programmes is a priority in ensuring that the programme and its graduates remain relevant to the industry and society. The university is also moving towards the re-designing of academic programmes by creating programmes that are transdisciplinary or hybrid in nature. This is a strategy that is most relevant to current industrial trends and global needs.

Meanwhile, Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM) deputy vice-chancellor (Academic and International) Professor Dr M. Iqbal Saripan said that having a couple of programmes dropped from a university is not “a big thing”.

“Universities, especially public universities, must be dynamic and we are responding to the needs of the industry and global shift. The decision to drop any programme is based on the study of the current market needs and indicators such as the popularity of the programmes and the graduate employability, as well as the sustainability of the programmes,” he said.

In the case of UPM dropping two programmes ― Bachelor of Education (Primary School Education and Master in Water Management ― the decision was made last year due to the low number of enrolment for Primary School Education studies. There are no students currently enrolled.

For water management, the decision is to phase it out totally.

The right programmes need to be offered to ensure graduate employability. -NSTP/Danial Saad

“The bachelor’s degree was a one-off programme and not sustainable to keep. We offer the Master of Water Engineering to cater to students interested to study water-related courses,” he said.

He assured that students currently enrolled in programmes that are being phased out will not have their qualifications affected as the qualifications are accredited by MQA.

“The degree will still be recognised,” he said.

The same goes for students of Universiti Malaysia Perlis (UniMAP), as in other public universities, said its vice-chancellor Professor Dr R. Badlishah Ahmad.

“The decision to drop a programme is not an easy one. Once a programme is dropped, current students still have to complete the whole programme and will graduate. The university will not force students to change their programmes,” he said.

IN THE PIPELINE

According to Universiti Malaya (UM) deputy vice-chancellor (Academic and International) Professor Dr Kamila Ghazali, rather than discussing which programmes will cease to be offered, it would be more productive to talk about the effective new programmes in the revamp.

“We are currently in the process of ensuring that every UM graduate will be technologically-savvy and equipped with various life skills from personal financial literacy to analytics and even artificial intelligence. We call this new initiative Student Holistic Empowerment.

“In this initiative, students will choose courses, as part of their electives, from four subject clusters ― Thinking Matters: Mind & Intellect; Emotional, Physical and Spiritual Intelligence: Heart, Body & Soul; Technology/Artificial Intelligence and Data Analytics: i-Techie; and Global Issues and Community Sustainability: Making the World a Better Place.

“This change is timely and will ensure that every graduate of UM is the best that any employer can find. This is our responsibility to our students,” she said.

She emphasised that the Student Holistic Empowerment subject clusters offered with every undergraduate programme will make every programme offered starting in 2020 essentially a new and improved one.

At UMT, programmes are being consolidated into lesser number of new programmes with more generic names according to the National Education Code (NEC), but with higher number of specialisation of study area that give students more options to choose from.

“The new programmes that we have in the pipeline are Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering Technology (Naval Architecture), Bachelor of Maritime Operation Management, Bachelor of Nanophysics, Bachelor of Data Analytics, Master in Tropical Biodiversity and Master in Tropical Marine Environment,” said Noor Azuan.

At UiTM, there are a number of new programmes in the pipeline ― Bachelor of Science (Hons) Eco-Technology and Bachelor of Creative Motion Design (Hons), and Diploma in Digital Audio Production, to name a few.

“The programmes are very much designed to be hybrid in nature, industry-based and relevant to the demands of IR4.0 and beyond,” said Mohamad Kamal.

UMK is set to offer two new programmes ― Bachelor of Accounting and a Bachelor of IT.

Noor Azizi said while there are similar courses, UMK’s differentiation this time is the designing and content of the courses are done together with close industry input and involvement and are meant to cater to real industry needs.

As part of the Malaysia Technical University Network (MTUN) which carries the Technical and Vocational Education Training (TVET) agenda, UniMAP is increasing the number of Bachelor of Technology (B.Tech) programmes.

The programmes in the pipeline are Bachelor of Technology in Automotive with Honours; Bachelor of Technology in Welding with Honours; Bachelor of Technology in Industrial Machining with Honours; and Bachelor of Technology in Building Construction with Honours.

“These programmes are crucial to facilitate students from vocational certification as opposed to Matriculation and STPM qualifications. As MoE has highlighted that UniMAP should offer programmes to cater for vocational and skilled qualification students, therefore, sufficient B.Tech programmes are crucial to be offered by all MTUN universities,” said R. Badlishah.

Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Melaka (UTeM) ― another MTUN university ― in a statement to Higher ED said new programmes that are in the pipeline include Bachelor of Technology in the Internet of Things (IOT), Telecommunication (focusing on 5G technology), Cloud Computing and E-Sports. The new programmes are jointly developed with industry leaders in the respective field.

INDUSTRY SAYS

To get insights into what the industry needs and demands, Nurmazilah said it is vital for universities to engage with industry and also professional and regulatory bodies for inputs, updates and direction.

As technology is a key disruptive force, it is vital that academics and universities embrace technology via engagement and advocacy.

“For example, in the context of accounting, while the basics of accounting such as manual double entries form the initial technical foundation, it is equally important that graduates be exposed to critical thinking and analysis as well as IT-related skills such as data analytics.

“Graduates would then be able to use these skills in the workplace to corroborate data and derive conclusions based on their organisation’s financial data and results.

“In addition, graduates must also be trained to understand and interpret accounting standards as they are principle based in nature.

“This requires good command of language as accountants have to be versatile on the application of accounting standards and not merely memorise the standards without proper understanding and thought processes,” she said.

Another example she gave relates to an organisation’s financial ratios.

“In the past, students were tasked with computing or crunching the numbers, rather than the interpretation of financial results which is a higher value-added skill.

“For graduates to be relevant in a world inundated with data which can be crunched by machines, they have to be trained to understand and interpret the results using tools such as analytics.

“This will enable them to provide the necessary value-added analysis and advisory in their organisations, making them relevant and indispensable,” she said.

Ganesh Kumar Bangah, chairman of the National Tech Association of Malaysia, said the main challenge that the IT industry often faces is not being able to find a candidate who fits into the technical roles they look for.

National Tech Association of Malaysia chairman Ganesh Kumar Bangah.

“There is often a mismatch between what we need and what the public university produces in their graduates. Their learning syllabus does not fit the requirements of today or tomorrow. This leads to the industry having to source for talents from private universities that have adopted a more current or up-to-date programmes for students,” he said.

One of the immediate areas that can be addressed is for public universities to take part in industry projects, and include representatives of the industry to co-teach the students. Universities can also opt to partner MNCs or any of the tech companies like some private colleges are already doing.

“While we understand the constraints of universities on policies etc, these policies need to change to accommodate the needs of today’s demands. Even the government is now moving into Industry Revolution 4.0 (IR4.0), the graduates will need to prepare themselves well.

“They can only do this if they get the right programmes, skills and training from the universities to become employable. Not only should students be academically ready but their social skills should also be improved, which covers their ability to speak and converse with people, be socially-inclined and can converse confidentially on various topics, too,” he concluded.

Source: https://www2.nst.com.my/education

Sarawakians looking down on TVET, laments Sarawak minister

TVET training and qualifications are looked down upon by many Sarawak parents as being inferior to academic qualifications. (Bernama pic)

KUCHING: Sarawakians do not have high regard for Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) qualifications, a state minister said today.

State Education, Science and Technological Research Minister Michael Manyin said TVET training and qualifications were looked down upon by parents as being inferior to academic qualifications.

School leavers also did not place much value on TVET training, he said during the closing ceremony of Worldskill Malaysia Sarawak 2019.

“Every year, Sarawak has between 35,000 and 38,000 school leavers with SPM qualifications and of these only about 20,000 to 25,000 further their studies in tertiary institutions or do skills training in TVET institutions.

Michael Manyin.

“Between 10,000 and 15,000 of these SPM school leavers do not undertake any further studies or training and enter directly into the job market often doing jobs that pay low wages and have little prospect for advancement,” he said.

Manyin said even though there was a huge demand for skilled workers and there were institutions offering courses in these trades, most of them were either under enrolled or had no takers.

Therefore, he said, it was the state education, science and technological research ministry’s main agenda to promote TVET and skills training as an equally attractive career development pathway.

Among the initiatives taken were through the Sarawak career and training fair, TVET symposium and TVET camps.

Another key programme by his ministry to raise the status of TVET was through the Worldskill Malaysia Sarawak competition, which is organised once in two years, he said.

The Worldskill Malaysia Sarawak was held to recognise and acknowledge the skills and competencies of Sarawak’s youths and to raise awareness about the value of vocational education and training as well as careers for those with skills training.

Source: https://www.freemalaysiatoday.com

Comment:
Well, not only Sarawakians look down on TVET, it’s the society in general, not limited to Malaysia but other developing countries as well.
Not easy to change the social stigma of the public as it’s been drilled in most parents mind that TVET is only for dropouts & those who are academically poor. And perhaps some jobs are deemed to be 3D (dangerous, dirty & difficult) (eg motor mechanics, underwater welding, electrician, construction worker etc).

But with so many academic graduates coming out jobless & statistics showing that
TVET graduates are highly employable (>90%), don’t you think that you as either parents or students should give TVET courses & jobs a second look or maybe even the 1st choice, if your interest is, in baking, sewing, woodworking, repairing cars etc?

And now TVET graduates are given the opportunity to even
further study to university level with the offering of Bachelor of Technology programs by members of Malaysian Technical University Network (MTUN) or management related degrees to enable TVET/skill graduates to graduate into management level. Don’t you agree that if you have hard (technical) & soft (management, communication, entrepreneurship) skills, you would be even better that those academic graduates who are mainly only good in non-technical skills?

Feel free to give your input 😀

Malaysian Technical University Network, Siemens team up to launch new degree program

KUALA LUMPUR (Aug 1): The Malaysian Technical University Network (MTUN) and Siemens Malaysia have inked a landmark collaboration that is set to prepare university graduates for the eventual world of systems integration.

MTUN and Siemens signed a letter of intent today as a symbolic significance that is meant to be a precursor to the memorandum of understanding agreement to be inked later in October.

In a statement today, Siemens said following this letter of intent, a new degree program called the Bachelor of Technology (Hons) Degree in Industrial Electronic Automation will be launched, with the first intake of students to be enrolled on Sept 1.Advertisement

MTUN is an umbrella network of four universities, namely Universiti Malaysia Perlis (UniMAP), Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia (UTHM), Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Melaka (UTeM), and Universiti Malaysia Pahang (UMP).

Siemens said ths collaboration is divided into two phases, with the first phase of student enrolment undertaken by UniMAP and UTHM as official pioneers to the start of the course.

It said UniMAP and UTHM will have 30 students each for this September intake, while Phase 2 will follow suit at a later stage for the two other institutions, namely UTeM and UMP.

This industry-education partnership for both MTUN and Siemens marks the first-of-its-kind cooperation that is rare even within the sector, embedding industrial training and software learning into the academic curriculum throughout the student’s degree over 3½ years.

It will see Siemens’ Total Integrated Automation modules being taught across the different disciplines for the syllabus which has been co-developed between Siemens Malaysia and the respective university.

During this time, industrial training will be provided for 1½ years and the two remaining years will be for classroom learning.

Upon graduation, students will be able to earn not just their Honors degree from a locally accredited university but also a professional certification from Siemens as qualified and versatile system integrators.

Siemens Malaysia senior vice president and head of digital industries Adam Yee said the launch of the Bachelor’s degree program is a further extension of the firm’s continuous efforts to its existing Siemens Innovation and Resources Training Center (SITRAIN) program that has already produced many skilled graduates for the technical and vocational education and training (TVET) pipeline sustainability, and reaffirms Siemens as the nation’s preferred technology and education partner for TVET and industry 4.0.

Meanwhile, UniMAP Faculty of Engineering Technology (Electronic Department) lecturer Ahmad Nasir Che Rosli said this collaboration with Siemens Malaysia will open up opportunities for MTUN students to undergo industrial attachment with Siemens partners and customers.

“The involvement of industries in developing the Bachelor of Technology curriculum has been very encouraging. In fact, MTUN has always engaged with the industries right from the start of the development process. Our practice is to have a series of workshops and meetings organized together, be it at MTUN level or the university level itself,” he said.

Source: www.theedgemarkets.coms

Comments: This is indeed a first of it’s kind and hopefully, more TVET industries would collaborate with TVET institutions, government or private, whether at certificate (SKM), diploma level (DKM) or advanced diploma (DLKM)

Kumpulan pertama lulusan diploma kemahiran lanjut pengajian di MTUN September ini

PUTRAJAYA, 30 Jan (Bernama) — Kumpulan pertama pelajar lulusan diploma kemahiran bakal melanjutkan pengajian ke peringkat ijazah sarjana muda di Rangkaian Universiti Teknikal Malaysia (MTUN) pada sesi pengajian September ini, kata Timbalan Menteri Sumber Manusia Datuk Mahfuz Omar.Beliau berkata Agensi Kelayakan Malaysia (MQA) dalam mesyuarat Majlis Pembangunan Kemahiran Kebangsaan (MPKK) secara prinsipnya bersetuju supaya keputusan Sijil Pelajaran Malaysia (SPM) tidak diambil kira untuk kemasukan ke peringkat ijazah sarjana muda sekiranya pemohon sudah mempunyai diploma atau diploma lanjutan dalam bidang kemahiran.

“Sebelum ini, dia (lulusan diploma kemahiran) tidak boleh masuk universiti sebab perlu tengok SPM, tetapi kalau dia dah ada diploma yang lebih tinggi daripada SPM, kita mahu supaya mereka diberi pengiktirafan,” katanya pada sidang media selepas mempengerusikan mesyuarat MPKK, di sini hari ini.

Sumber: http://www.bernama.com

Komen: Bukan setakat MTUN je yang boleh terima, ada juga IPTS pun mungkin boleh berbuat demikian.
Admin pun telah menerima panggilan baru-baru ni dari salah sebuah IPTS untuk membincangkan kerjasama.
Sekiranya IPTS anda berminat, boleh hubungi admin juga di tvetuni@gmail.com atau 012-3123430 untuk bincangkan butirannya.

Bringing back credibility to tertiary education

‘For universities to be relevant, excellent and effective, a high level of quality must be achieved in various aspects, and this can be done through having academics who are more visible with works that are used by the community,’ – DR MASZLEE MALIK, Education Minister

Many will find higher education a challenging world as it is here that students will get to know their real selves, the destination of the journey they are taking in life and the means of getting there.

Hence why the Education Ministry finds it crucial to bring back credibility to public universities and higher education through improved quality and emphasis on values as the core of education.

Education Minister Dr Maszlee Malik, in delivering his 2019 mandate titled “Education for All” last week, said the ministry has underlined four key directions for higher education – quality, autonomy, collaboration and internationalisation.

“University is an open intellectual field. It is there that theoretical debates, lively and open discourse, as well as the sharing of knowledge take place.

“For universities to be relevant, excellent and effective, a high level of quality must be achieved in various aspects, and this can be done through having academics who are more visible with works that are used by the community. We encourage universities to nurture the culture of having dialogues, debates, discourse and other intellectual programmes that will provide solutions to society’s problems and develop the nation,” he said.

Ethics is another important aspect that has to be focused on, he said.

“Bad work ethics, plagiarism, and academic bullying must cease. Integrity will not be compromised. Publication of article that has no quality should be exterminated. Publication should reflect the mastery of intellectuals in their respective fields and be regarded as universal reference within the field,” he said.

The ministry will also increase the quality of research grants to ensure that knowledge transfer will occur, encourage translation of great works and the research will establish results that will resolve current community and national problems in a substantial manner. Lecturers who have been awarded research grants are encouraged to guide and finance their post-graduate candidates by appointing them as research assistants.

“For lecturers promotion, we will start moving towards using a big data-based system with artificial intelligence that will accommodate all efforts and contributions from lecturers to determine auto-promotion eligibility. The requirement to fill endless forms will cease,” he said.

The library will be a broad and borderless repository of knowledge and the communication system between libraries at all universities and access to external publications be improved.

“We are aiming to have public universities and the higher education sector be referred to by the global community. The process of internationalisation includes the effort to increase the number of foreign students coming to Malaysia to study in line with the vision of making Malaysia an international education hub, and building more branches of local universities abroad through the satellite university method,” he said.

To increase autonomy at universities, the ministry will reassess the key performance indicators (KPIs) of each faculty and repeal the one-size-fits-all KPIs. Universities will be divided into clusters to create synergy and collaboration to no longer move alone. Autonomy is given to universities and their clusters to determine their respective KPIs.

Empowering students at higher education institutions had been and would continue to be given emphasis, said Maszlee.

Dr Maszlee Malik speaking at the Education Minister’s Mandate 2019 ceremony in Universiti Putra Malaysia. PIC BY ROSELA ISMAIL

Among the first attempts was the abolition of Section 15(1)(c) of the Universities and University Colleges Act 1971, which restricts the involvement of students in political activities on campus. This cancellation is in line with the government’s intention to lower voters’ age limit to 18 years.

“In addition, through continuous collaboration with the administrators of public universities in the country, we are working to create a Students’ Union, which has long been buried in the history of the country. Through the union, students will have more roles, opportunities and responsibilities in the decision-making process at each university,” he said.

The third direction – collaboration – will see the ecosystem of intellectuals be made more vibrant.

“This can be done through a mentor-mentee relationship between senior professors and new lecturers to realise more schools of thoughts in their respective fields. In this case, the universities should not be alienated from the reality of life. To prepare our students to become public intellectuals to handle tasks as society’s troubleshooters, universities must create collaborations with all the appropriate parties, such as schools, polytechnics and vocational colleges. A lot can be done by public universities to help local communities, including giving training to improve the quality of the teaching and learning process in schools,” said Maszlee.

In addition, universities also need to collaborate with other parties to create endowment from the waqf and zakat institution, as well as alumni.

“Use tax incentives to activate financial endowment through alumni. The alumni of the public universities are also asked to return to their alma mater to help out as is the case with international leading universities,” Maszlee urged.

A more drastic and comprehensive internationalisation effort will be mobilised, he said.

“Most importantly, academics of the public university should be referred to internationally in their respective fields and no longer just be jaguh kampung. High-quality work must be produced and translated, and the process of translation must be actively executed; rebranding and marketing must be organised more effectively at the global level. We also need to increase the mobility of professors and staff outside the country as well as have more academics from overseas visiting and serving in our country,” he said.

As for TVET (Technical and Vocational Education and Training), he said the ministry would continue to improve institutional capabilities and systems of TVET to remain competitive and meet market expectations.

“The ministry will implement a harmonised accreditation system with quality assurance for enabling student mobility in TVET institutions, including those in the Malaysian Technical University Network (MTUN).

“MTUN should also be moving towards the Fachhochschule system in Germany and measured with the production of technical graduates and the resolution of technical issues, and not merely producing publications.

“We will improve the quality and delivery of TVET programmes to improve the skills of graduates through an industry-led approach, eliminating duplication of programmes and resource, increasing cost effectiveness, and expanding TVET funding to increase enrolment,” said Maszlee.

“At the same time, the ministry is in the process of resolving the issue of recognising qualification from vocational colleges that will allow them to have equal opportunity to pursue higher education.

“This requires that vocational colleges be placed parallel with the other institutions of TVET to be in line with the industry’s direction,” he said.

Polytechnics and community colleges will also not be left out from reformation efforts to be carried out this year.

“Networking and joint ventures between the two institutions with the industry, particularly big and renowned companies, is a priority to ensure the marketability of graduates in technical fields.

“The alignment between MTUN and polytechnics is aimed to ensure opportunities for polytechnic graduates to continue their education. Polytechnics and community colleges has also opened up opportunities for the tahfiz students to equip themselves with the skills for a career in life,” he said.

Maszlee said the ministry was serious in making TVET on a par with other choices; not a second or an alternative option.

Source: https://www.nst.com.my

TVET, a stepchild no more

Students of Politeknik Ungku Omar get hands on training on automotive engineering at the workshop at their campus in Ipoh.

Students of Politeknik Ungku Omar get hands on training on automotive engineering at the workshop at their campus in Ipoh.

A framework has been proposed to address the long-standing problems of our TVET system

A NEW framework for technical and vocational training is in the pipelines.

If approved, the proposal will see a more streamlined, effective, and industry-relevant, Technical and Vocational Education Training (TVET) system.

Proposed by the National TVET Movement to the Economic Planning Unit last month, the framework aims to address the country’s ailing TVET system.

“Our focus is on upper secondary school students. We want to create a TVET champion.

TVET students being trained to be industry-ready. — File photo

TVET students being trained to be industry-ready. — File photo

“We want students to have better access to choices between academics and something more hands-on like TVET. This is what’s happening in other countries,” said Ahmad Tajudin, who recently retired as the Education Ministry deputy director-general.

Among those part of the Movement are the Federation of Human Resources Ministry’s Department of Skills Development (JPK) Accredited Centres (FeMac), National Council of Professors, and the National Parent-Teacher Associations’ Vocational and Technical Consultative Council.

For too long, TVET has been the “troubled stepchild” of the education system, he said.

This framework tackles long-standing problems like the:

> Overlapping of programmes and certifications;

> Misguided focus on post-secondary TVET students instead of upper secondary students;

> Existence of multiple accreditation bodies and agencies implementing TVET;

> High operations cost resulting from the many ministries involved;

> Weak policies; and

> Private TVET providers being treated as competitors.

“All TVET institutions should be streamlined, rationalised, and consolidated, under the Education Ministry.

“This ensures that teachers and trainers are better taken care of under one scheme of service. And, there won’t be a need to close down any institutions if all facilities and resources are under one roof,” he said, adding that it would also be more cost effective for the Government while ensuring smoother communication between the industry and institutions.

Other reforms proposed by the Movement include:

> Reducing existing certifications to an important few;

> Having a single accreditation body for TVET;

> Establishing two educational pathways for students to choose from;

> Allowing industries to take the lead;

> Enhancing TVET apprenticeship programmes based on models from other developed countries; and

> Formulating policies and legislations to enhance careers in TVET.

Greater emphasis, and an overview, of TVET implementation is needed, Ahmad Tajudin said.

There should be training provisions to facilitate contributions from private TVET providers, and there must be closer collaboration between the industry and these providers.

“Our TVET system needs stronger institutional coordination, and greater transparency among the multiple public agencies.

“TVET restructuring is a small part of a holistic solution, but it’s a start to the reform,” he said, adding that strong political will from the Government was crucial to ensure the country’s TVET success.

Education Minister Dr Maszlee Malik said the Government would continue enhancing the capabilities of TVET institutions and systems to remain competitive and meet industry demands.

Speaking during his annual new year address in Serdang on Monday, he said the ministry would implement a harmonised accreditation and quality assurance system to enable student mobility in TVET institutions, which includes the Malaysian Technical University Network (MTUN).

The launch of Limkokwing TVET International, a TVET Malaysia Training Centre at Limkokwing University.MOHD SAHAR MISNI/The Star

The launch of Limkokwing TVET International, a TVET Malaysia Training Centre at Limkokwing University.MOHD SAHAR MISNI/The Star

MTUN, he said, should move in the direction of Fachhochschule – Germany’s tertiary education institution specialising in topical areas.

MTUN, he added, shouldn’t be evaluated solely based on publications, but also on the ability of the graduates produced to solve technical issues.

He said the ministry plans to increase the quality and delivery of TVET by enabling the industry to lead the curriculum development, avoid overlapping of programmes and resources, improve cost effectiveness, and widen the funding to increase enrolment.

He said the ministry was also in the midst of addressing recognition issues involving controversial vocational colleges.

He assured polytechnics and community colleges that they wouldn’t be sidelined in the reform process.

“To ensure the employability of our graduates, closer collaboration between these institutions and the industry – especially with the big players – will be prioritised,” he said, adding that these were part of the ministry’s efforts in making sure that TVET, polytechnics, vocational colleges, and community colleges, are no longer seen as second choice options.

In June last year, Dr Maszlee appointed Lembah Pantai MP Nurul Izzah Anwar to chair a special TVET task force.

The duties of the task force, said Dr Maszlee, was to conduct research across all ministries that provide TVET education and training, and recommend how the country’s TVET system can be improved. This includes a review of TVET education and training laws, and the possibility of a TVET commission.

However, the TVET industry was left reeling following Nurul Izzah’s resignation as PKR vice president on Dec 17, and her decision to no longer serve the federal government in any capacity.

“We’ll continue advocating for a sustainable and effective TVET implementation,” said Ahmad Tajudin.

Source: www.thestar.com.my

Comment: It’s good that the Ministry has identified the weaknesses & looking to implement the reforms (personally, I see that our TVET sector would soar to much greater heights compared to now, if reforms are implemented effectively & correctly).

But I have a doubt whether they would reform this particular weakness – Private TVET providers being treated as competitors.

It seems that there are plans to gradually “KILL” the private TVET providers based on their proposed plans (hearsay, so take it with a pinch of salt).


These include but not limited to:

1) Closing all TVET providers that are 2 stars and below after the impending 2019 star rating process (as early as March 2019). It generally affects the smaller private TVET providers who has very limited resources (manpower & finances) vs the public TVET institutions.
2) Closing/revoke Vocational Training Operation (VTO) programme of any private TVET institutions that has does not meet a min of 4 stars and above for that particular programme. Eventually, it would be just offered by the multiple satellite campuses of CIAST, nationwide,
3) Restrict the organising of the JPK’s various induction courses (PP-PPD-PPB, PP-PPT, PPL) to only  CIAST satellite campuses, nationwide.
4) and BEYOND – perhaps you can comment if you think what they are doing/planning to do is gonna KILL the private TVET providers.

What lies ahead in 2019 for higher education?

(File pix) Diversity and education for all.

WITH Pakatan Harapan’s victory in the May 9 general election last year, the education landscape saw the merging of the Education Ministry, once the caretaker of school-level matters, with the Higher Education Ministry under the leadership of Education Minister Dr Maszlee Malik.

The merger is the platform for the planning, implementation and management of strategies and operations, from pre-school to higher education and lifelong learning in a continuum.

Diversity and education for all is the ministry’s mission as evidenced by the June 2018 intake at public universities, polytechnics, community colleges and public skills training institutions.

Out of the intake of 182,409 post-sijil Pelajaran Malaysia (SPM) candidates, 17,338 places were offered to those from the B40 group, 299 to the disabled, 348 to Orang Asli and 1,225 to sports athletes. The trend of offering education opportunities at the tertiary level is expected to continue.

The education Ministry also pledged to make technical and vocational education and training (TVET) as students’ first choice of studies in the next five years.

Maszlee said TVET empowers every level of society towards equitable development, poverty reduction and economic prosperity.

However, several issues must be addressed, including strengthening the governance of TVET for better management, harmonising rating systems across both private and public TVET institutions, and enhancing the quality and delivery of TVET programmes to improve graduates’ employability.

The Budget 2019 speech revealed that the Education Ministry received the lion’s share with an allocation of RM60.2 billion, emphasising the critical importance of education for the nation’s progress.

The 2019 budget made substantial allocations for scholarships including a RM2.1 billion boost to the MARA education scholarships Programme and RM17.5 million over the next five years to the Malaysia Professional Accountancy centre (MyPAC) to produce more qualified bumiputera accountants.

Yayasan Peneraju Pendidikan Bumiputera received RM210 million for three of its programmes — Program Peneraju Tunas, Program Peneraju Skil (technical and vocational skills programmes) and Program Peneraju Professional (professional certifications in finance and accounting).

To ensure there are funds for those seeking to pursue tertiary studies, the national Higher Education Fund Corporation is reviewing its repayment mechanism.

Its chairman Wan Saiful Wan Jan said the review is expected to take six months before it is presented to the Cabinet for approval. The entity is actively holding meetings with various parties including community leaders, non-governmental organisations and other stakeholders to obtain relevant information and input before the draft is prepared.

With the abolishment of section 15(2)(c) of the universities and university colleges Act 1971 last month, students have the freedom to take part in politics on campus. This will further expose undergraduates to the democratic system and foster active participation in the governance of the country. Starting this year, student unions will be set up to develop students’ ability to manage their affairs on campus and empower them to lead the nation.

(File pix) Rahmah Mohamed, MQA chief executive officer

Enhancing the quality of education

As an education hub, Malaysia is a popular destination for local and international students because of the quality of academic programmes provided by higher education institutions in the country which are accredited by the Malaysian Qualifications Agency (MQA).

MQA chief executive officer Datuk Dr Rahmah Mohamed said its accreditation is widely accepted in Asia, New Zealand, Japan, Australia, United Kingdom and Europe.

“We are recognised as a global brand. If a student graduates from a MQA-accredited programme in Malaysia or a Malaysian institution, they can work in any of these countries,” she added.

For this year, MQA plans to train qualifications officers from countries which require accreditation of programmes such as the Pacific Islands and those emerging from war as well as nations which do not have such agencies.

It will also introduce standards for micro-credentials. Micro-credentialing is the process of earning a micro-credential, which is like a mini degree or certification in a specific topic. To earn a microcredential, you need to complete a certain number of activities, assessments or projects related to the topic “We are looking at enabling individuals to earn credits from short courses organised by higher education institutions, accumulating those credits and ending up with a diploma or degree,” added Rahmah.

“In today’s environment, universities cannot work on their own but need to collaborate. If they subscribe to the same set of standards, a course offered by X University for example can be recognised by University Y.

“And University Y can then offer another set of courses to help students accumulate more credits.

“MQA is always looking for academic products that can contribute to the adult environment. Micro-credentials help students learn and earn on they go.”

Micro-cedentials can be offered by both public and private institutions as long as they subscribe to MQA standards.

“We are targeting to have the standards in place within the first quarter of this year followed by a roadshow. I foresee the implementation of micro-credentials will be rolled out six months later.”

The Accreditation of Prior Experiential Learning – Qualification (APEL Q) is in the pipeline.

“APEL Q is still at the study stage. A person who has 20 years of work experience will sit a test and his portfolio will be assessed to determine an award of up to a master’s degree, without having to attend classes.”

MQA will conduct a pilot project after carrying out a feasibility study.

“When we roll it out, we will be the most advanced in Asia in terms of such qualifications.”

MQA believes there is a need to enhance the qualification of working adults without the need to be physically at university.

“We need to contribute to the advancement of the country and, to do this, we need to evolve and improve our stature in academics and education.

So, this is what MQA is striving for.”

Focus on skills

More often than not, SPM school-leavers who are not academically inclined are at a loss after getting their exam results.

Their results may not be up to mark to enable them to continue their studies at conventional higher education institutions and they may not even have an interest in academic pursuit. Without training and education, they may not have the skills for a bright future in the working world.

The Education Ministry’s Technical and Vocational Education Division encourages those who are not academically-inclined to pursue TVET as early as 16 years of age.

Division director Zainuren Mohd Nor sees 2019 as the year to strengthen and empower TVET.

The division runs three programmes: Kolej Vokasional (KV), Program Vokasional Menengah Atas (PVMA) and Perantisan Industri Menengah Atas (PIMA).

“The aim of KVs is to produce skilled workers who meet industry need or become entrepreneurs,” he said.

The aim is to get 70 per cent of its graduates employed, 20 per cent to continue studies and the remaining to become entrepreneurs.

“We have signed 775 memoranda of understanding for on-the-job training with the industry. We collaborate with the industry to produce students with skills required by the Industry Revolution 4.0 (IR4.0). We also partner with TVET colleges from, for example, Korea, China and Italy to gain exposure,” he added.

“Diploma Vokasional Malaysia graduates with a 3.5 CGPA can opt for higher studies. Or they can gain work experience and then opt for APEL Q.

“Budding entrepreneurs can enrol in the School Enterprise programme. They can set up their businesses during studies with the help of Companies Commission of Malaysia and relevant cooperatives.”

KV graduates are awarded the diploma as well as Malaysia Skills certificate. Some 96.7 per cent of the 2017 cohort are employed. As of Press time, the statistics for 2018 were unavailable.

As demand for places at vocational colleges is overwhelming, those who opt for TVET education can do so by joining the PVMA programme at day schools. They will be awarded two certificates — SPM and Malaysian Skills Certificate.

“They sit for only three SPM papers — Bahasa Malaysia, English and History — which qualify them to apply for places at vocational institutions.

They will also be awarded the Malaysia Skills Certificate Level 2 which certifies them as partially skilled and they can gain employment or become entrepreneurs.”

Last year, 269 schools ran PVMA programmes with an increase to 350 this year.“PIMA offers potential school dropouts a chance to learn and earn. They are in school for two days to learn SPM Bahasa Malaysia, English and History, and spend three days working in the industry. Some 116 schools were involved in 2018 while the number is increased to 200 this year.”

Students will be awarded a SPM certificate as well as a letter of testimony from employers.

The State Education Department and the District Education Office select the schools which carry out this programme subject to the availability of the industry in the vicinity of the school. Students, who are selected by school counsellors, get an allowance from the industry and will be monitored by it.

In the Sistem Latihan Dual Nasional programme, students learn at school for six months and attend industry training for another six months.

“I urge society to change its perception of TVET and encourage more industry players to partner with us to develop TVET.

“We want the industry to provide student placements, taking on a corporate social responsibility approach. The industry can provide facilities and equipment to ensure training is in line with IR4.0.

“Students too need to change their mindset from just being an employee to that of an entrepreneur.”

(File pix) Raja Azura Raja Mahayuddin


Scholarships

The allocation of RM17.5 million over the next five years to MyPAC will go towards its target to produce 600 Bumiputera professional accountants, said its chief executive officer Datuk Zaiton Mohd Hassan.

There are plans to boost Bumiputera education through sponsorship programmes, including collaborating with institutions which provide scholarships specifically for Bumiputeras, particularly students from B40 families, to pursue professional accountancy qualifications.

MyPAC was established in 2015, in collaboration with Yayasan Peneraju, to increase the number of certified Bumiputera accountants.

It aims to create the opportunity and provide the ecosystem for those with the capability and ambition to obtain a professional accountancy qualification.

Through the scholarship programmes, the number of graduates has risen from only two in 2015 to 141 last year, with 2,154 full-time scholars, and 2,654 current scholars.

Nor Dalina Abdullah, one of the earliest recipients of MyPAC scholarship, said she got to know of MyPAC in 2015, which allowed her to complete her ACCA examinations in the same year.

“The scholarship provided me with the means to continue my ACCA education. Its support was instrumental in my passing the examinations,” said Nor Dalina, who works as an analyst at Baker Hughes, a General Electric Company. Her role requires her to interact with her colleagues of different rank, including those in other countries.

“As a founding member of MyPAC Accountants Club, I hope to contribute back especially to MyPAC’s Outreach programme to inspire potential candidates in the fulfilling career as a professional accountant,” she added.

Meanwhile, Muhammad Shafiq Mohd Yusof, Muhammad Hakimie Mat Hat Hassan and Ahmad Fauzee Mohd Hassan attribute their success to Yayasan Peneraju’s three key thrusts—Peneraju Tunas, Peneraju Skil and Peneraju Profesional programmes.

Muhammad Shafiq, from a B40 family in Perak, pursued studies at a private university with aid from Yayasan Peneraju, and he works at a multinational corporation with an average salary of above RM5,000 a month. Muhammad Hakimie, from Terengganu, is trained and certified as a welder, with a salary of RM9,000 while Ahmad Fauzee, who is pursuing the ACCA qualification, ranked first in the world for a subject he took as part of the professional certification syllabus.

Yayasan Peneraju chief executive Raja Azura Raja Mahayuddin said a structured scholarship and development programme allows individuals to further studies without financial worries.

“Yayasan Peneraju is thankful for the government’s trust in its efforts in empowering the education of youth especially those from lower income households.

“We are committed to strengthening the Bumiputera community in response to the government’s call to sustain and empower education and human capital.”

As at December 2018, the foundation has helped 23,000 people benefit from education, TVET training (and employment) and professional certification funding and development programmes.

With an allocation of RM210 million under the 2019 Budget, the foundation will be offering more than 7,000 new opportunities this year, including focus of existing programmes on certifications in technology-related fields, professional accreditation programmes for accounting and finance, and a new initiative — Khaira Ummah — for those from religious and tahfiz schools.

There is also the Super High-Income Programme to increase the number of Bumiputeras who earn a monthly income of RM20,000 in specialised and niche fields.

The foundation will focus on target groups — 1,500 youths from challenging socio-economic background with average-to-excellent academic results (Peneraju Tunas); 4,000 dropouts, non-academically-inclined, unemployed youths and low skilled/semi-skilled workforce (Peneraju Skil); as well as 1,600 new and existing workforce including SPM and university graduates, who are aspiring to be specialists (Peneraju Profesional).

Out of the 1,600, it will groom 1,000 professional accountants, chartered financial analysts and financial risk managers annually.

A new programme, Peneraju Tunas Kendiri, which provides opportunities for the disabled, will be introduced this year.

Khaira Ummah will start with two programmes — Huffaz Pintar (SPM fast track) and Huffaz Skil.

“We want to open up career pathways to these group of students through academic courses and technical and vocational education or even to those who aspire to be professionals.”

The Health Ministry has an allocation of RM250 million worth of scholarships for medical doctors, paramedics (including medical assistants), nurses and medical students.

Some 40 per cent RM100 million) is allocated for 1,100 doctors per year (compared to 1,000 in the previous years) to pursue master’s degree in various disciplines.

The ministry spokesperson said about 12,000 medical college students will attend basic paramedic courses and 9,000 nurses will continue post-basic nursing programmes.

There are a variety of master’s degree programmes in medicine and health, including Science/Clinical, Research, Education and Public Health at local universities.

In Malaysia, a master’s degree in medicine and healthcare is a stepping stone to a career in medicine (as a doctor) or an alternative career in another aspect of the field.

Resilience

Looking forward, Raja Azura applauded the government’s efforts in equipping the nation’s future generations with quality education.

The challenge is keeping up with technological advancements and embracing IR4.0 so as not to be left behind.

“Employers’ expectations of employees have moved towards technology-savvy communication skills, which in turn, require tertiary institutions to impart such abilities to students.

“I am hopeful that the higher education can prepare future generations to face IR4.0, which will impact all economies, industries and society at its core.

“It may very well challenge fundamental ideas about what it means to be human as it is slowly blurring the line between the physical, digital and biological, and changing the way we interact with emerging digital technology such as artificial intelligence, analytics and the Internet of Things.”

Raja Azura lauds the spirit of learnability and resilience.

“This is the desire and ability to quickly grow and adapt to remain relevant as people who are willing to learn will be agile and are versatile. They will also rank higher on the employability scale in today’s dynamic world.”

Zaiton of MyPAC hopes universities will encourage Bachelor in Accountancy graduates to pursue professional accountancy qualifications as they are only required to pass four ACCA papers, for example.

Source: www.nst.com.my

Comments: 
1) What’s the point that the programs are accredited by MQA, recognised by many countries in the world but many of the local graduates are unemployed, mainly due to poor command of English language & the syllabus is so out of date and not relevant to the industry (same problem with TVET education system as well, most TVET institutions don’t produce graduates that matches the industry’s needs)

2) Introducing micro-credentials in the academic world is a great idea, it’s similar to TVET’s system where students/candidates can just go for certain Competency Units (CU) and upon obtaining all CU in that particular program, they can be awarded a Malaysian Skill Certificate (MSC) or more well known as Sijil Kemahiran Malaysia (SKM)

3) Accreditation of Prior Experiential Learning – Qualification (APEL Q) is another great system that allows experienced workers that didn’t go through formal education to obtain their Diploma, Degree, Masters or even PhD. However, devils is in the details. It maybe subject to manipulation by certain parties for quick & easy profit.
APEL Q is just like Pengiktirafan Pencapaian Terdahulu (PPT) in our TVET context. Unfortunately, I’ve received feedbacks on how some of these candidates (with the help of CONnsultants created fake evidences & managed to obtain their SKM certificate via the PPT method.
Besides that, can you imagine someone that has >10 SKM qualifications under his/her belt? And it can be so diverse from each other, eg having SKM in aesthetic, hairdressing, massage, aromatherapy, make-up (this group can be quite related to each other) AND culinary, office management and GOD knows what else!
Last heard the Department of Skill Development (DSD or better known as JPK) is checking on this & will take action. Haizz, always after nasi sudah jadi bubur.

4) Diploma Vokasional Malaysia graduates with a 3.5 CGPA can opt for higher studies
– What about Diploma Kemahiran Malaysia (DKM) & Diploma Lanjutan Kemahiran Malaysia (DLKM) graduates from the TVET stream? My understanding is that thus far, only graduates from selected programs like engineering based programs can further study to selected public local higher institutions (IPTA) which are collectively known as MTUN (Malaysian Technical University Network)

5) With the increase of more & more PVMA, private TVET providers are advised not to run the same program as these PVMA’s, especially if you’re tartgeting the same group of students (mainly the B40). Many private TVET providers are already crying for help due to lower number of students registration from this group of students, coupled with the dwindling funding/financing by Perbadanan Tabung Pembangunan Kemahiran (PTPK)