Tag Archives: skills training

Government emphasises TVET but TVET not a popular education pathway…

A key aspect of the skills mismatch is between academic qualifications and technical and vocational qualifications. Malaysia’s Education Blueprints emphasise technical and vocational education and training (TVET) as essential for the needs of the labour market and economy. However, only 13% of all upper secondary students are pursuing TVET courses, while at the higher education level less than 9% are in polytechnics. It has often been noted that students and their parents regard TVET as an inferior educational pathway, ‘dead end’ and for the academically challenged. But, in fact, according to the School to Work Transition Survey (SWTS), both young job seekers and young workers consider TVET as the most useful qualification for getting a good job—the reasons for the mismatch/misperception need to be addressed. For example, the salary differential could be an important reason; the SWTS found that there is a significant wage differential between TVET graduates and those with other types of hard skills.

Only 1% of all Chinese and 4% of Indian secondary school students are pursuing technical and vocational education as compared to 15% of Bumiputera students. Despite the government’s recognition of technical and vocational education and training (TVET) as critical to meet the demands of industry and contribute to economic growth, TVET is still not attractive as an education pathway choice. A number of reasons have been identified, including the fact that TVET graduates and practitioners are not recognised as professionals and, therefore are not able to demand higher wages and career advancement. Those from such schools also have limited access to higher education institutions (EPU (n.d., pp.9-4 to 9-7). TVET is often negatively perceived as the second or last choice and only ventured into by those who do not have good academic qualifications (Cheong and Lee (2016)).

To get a good job, the most useful qualification is professional… The students were asked about the education or training they consider most useful for getting a good job (Table 2.5).

All students, irrespective of ethnicity, gender or urban-rural location, prioritise professional qualifications. This view is clearly in line with their strong preference for professional occupations.

Overall, technical and vocational skills training is the next most important qualification, after professional qualification, to get a good job – this is striking in that it contrasts sharply with the relatively low attendance in TVET schools noted in Chart 2.3.

The secondary school students appear to be aware of the importance of TVET for the job market but would rather pursue an academic education. Chinese students do not find technical and vocational skills training to be particularly important (this may be linked to their relatively low attendance at TVET schools); they put more emphasis on internships and on-the-job training and also on business management degrees. In fact, all ethnic groups recognise the importance of apprenticeship training and work experience for getting a good job. This very likely reflects their perception that employers want to hire those with work experience and that a major reason why they do not easily get jobs upon completing their education is that they do not have practical experience.

Malaysian youth can pursue an academic pathway to acquire a higher education qualification or they have the option of technical and vocational education and training (TVET) programmes that lead to the award of skills qualification (at certificate-Sijil Kemahiran Malaysia, diploma-Diploma Kemahiran Malaysia or advanced diploma-Diploma Lanjutan Kemahiran Malaysia levels). The TVET programmes are currently offered by various ministries, government agencies and private sector institutions, leading to unintended competition and duplication (MOE (2015, p.4-4)). Currently, there is a perception that TVET qualifications offer fewer attractive career and academic progression, thereby limiting the number of students who apply for such courses. The aim of the government, therefore, is to “move from a higher education system with a primary focus on university education as the sole pathway to success, to one where academic and TVET pathways are equally valued and cultivated” (Ibid., p.E-13. In addition, a TVET Masterplan is currently under study to develop skilled talent to meet the growing and changing demands of industry, promote individual opportunities for career development and ensure that the country has the skilled technical workforce it needs to reach high income status)

To get a good job, they consider TVET the most useful qualification… The job seekers, in particular the Bumiputeras and Others, identify TVET as most useful for getting a good job (Chart 4.20). This is striking when contrasted with the low ranking given to TVET by tertiary students (20% of job seekers as compared to 12% of tertiary students). It is also striking given that less than 5% of the job seekers have such qualifications (as shown earlier in Chart 4.3). The Chinese and Indian job seekers, on the other hand, feel that a professional qualification is most useful. Among all job seekers there is recognition of the usefulness of on-the-job training and apprenticeships; they recognise that work experience often counts in getting a job.

The salary range for new workers

Mean salaries offered for those with TVET qualifications are quite significantly below those for university graduates—which may help to shed light on why TVET qualifications are not popular among the young.

Employers from the public sector, public listed companies and also private contractors prefer undergraduates from local universities for skilled jobs. Other employers who indicate a preference for TVET graduates in skilled jobs include sole proprietors, private limited companies and especially private contractors. For the low-skilled or manual workers, employers do not have strong educational preferences; where there are preferences it is worth noting that the public sector and public listed companies indicate a preference for TVET graduates.

Overhaul the current TVET system
A plethora of weaknesses has been identified in the current TVET system and solutions proposed with little sustainable impact to date. The establishment by the government of a National Taskforce to reform TVET holds promise of real change—that will happen only if there is a complete structural overhaul of the system to:

– Ensure strategic coordination, importantly, by bringing the diverse and huge number of training providers (over 1,000 public and private TVET institutions) under a single effective governance body that can provide quality assurance for the skill outputs from the different institutions;
– Prioritise a demand-driven approach by ensuring close industry involvement to realistically relate training to workforce needs, including providing incentives for employers to offer WBT;
– Establish a relevant and reliable competency standards and qualifications framework for better matching and to facilitate entry of TVET graduates into universities; and
– Raise the status of TVET, including through gender-sensitive labour market information and career guidance, including introducing role models. A review of salary differentials between TVET graduates and those from other educational streams could also shed light on the issues that need to be addressed.

Source: Excerpts from Khazanah Research Institute (KRI) 2018

Oil palm training at Montfort

KOTA KINABALU: Montfort Youth Training Centre (MYTC) will be introducing a new skill training course for youths with the implementation of its pilot Oil Palm Plantation Conductorship course.The new course, which will be rolled out in July 2019 at its campus in Kinarut, is carried out in partnership with the Malaysian Estate Owners Association (MEOA), MYTC said in a statement.MEOA and its members, including their affiliate from Sarawak Oil Palm Plantation Owners Association (SAPPOA), will provide the initial leadership, knowledge sharing, along with a start-up funding of RM200,000. This is part of the association’s social responsibility contribution towards human resource development, the centre added.

Other companies such as IJM Plantations Berhad and Eurostar Tractors will also be rendering local technical and training support.MYTC noted in 2018, Sabah and Sarawak had a total of 3.1 million hectares of oil palm planted area and covers over 53 per cent of total oil palm planted area in Malaysia. It also noted that there is a dire requirement for quality and skilled local human resource for this sector which has contributed significantly to the annual GDP. “In this sector, there are many employment opportunities throughout its supply chain ranging from working in the upstream sector involving estates and mills to the downstream activities, and also the spin-off service providers. In this context, the Youth-in-Need should not be left out,” MYTC said.The course aims to generate skilled workforce who can contribute to the pursuit and improvement of best practices in the oil palm industry. MYTC also aims to forge partnerships with other relevant industry stakeholders through sharing of expertise and knowledge. It also welcomes sponsorship and monetary contribution.It believes that the plantation course is also very relevant as many of the less privileged youth especially from the rural interior areas in Sabah and Sarawak are very likely to be exposed to the grass-root agricultural activities. With their acquired new skill and know-hows, the youth can be gainfully employed in the many plantation companies throughout Malaysia and/or returning to their homes to be future entrepreneurs and good stewards of their lands. 

The MYTC plantation conductorship course emphasises on both the knowledge and practical skills needed in the field of supervision in plantation. Trainees will learn supervisory role, safety practices, distribution of materials to the fields, suitability of correct equipment and machinery to be used; appropriate supervision of workers to ensure production standards are achieved, provide work schedule and generate daily reports and progress of works. In addition, basic motor vehicle mechanics and shielded metal arc welding will also be incorporated for them for an appreciation of the machineries and workshop practices in plantation.To fortify the coursework, the trainees will also undergo field work trainings as well as industry practical attachment training in the plantation. They will also be nurtured in basic communication in English language, arithmetic and computer knowledge over the two years programme.Graduating trainees from the course can apply for Plantation Field Conductor posts. Potential and opportunities to be promoted and progress beyond staff to executive level are possible.Thye centre announced that eligible youth are encouraged to apply. They must be between18 to 20 years with priority accorded to those who are orphaned, from poor and large families particularly from the rural and interiors areas of Sabah and Sarawak. SPM leavers, as well as youth who did not complete their formal primary and secondary school education but are interested in the course are also encouraged to apply. Interested youth are to contact MYTC (www.montfortsabah.org) for more information and to submit their application forms accordingly.The two-year course which covers full training and boarding will be provided free for the eligible and selected trainees. However, MYTC said parents/ guardian/sponsors are encouraged to contribute a minimum monthly sum towards the trainees’ food subsidy based on their affordability.Currently, MYTC conducts four skills training courses over two-year residential care programmes, namely in Motor Mechanic, Shielded Metal Arc Welding, Refrigeration & Air-conditioning Mechanic and Furniture Making. The birth of the Oil Palm Plantation Conductorship will be its fifth (5th) skill training programme.

Source: http://www.dailyexpress.com.my

TVET good option for furthering studies and getting jobs, says Kula

Human Resources Minister M Kula Segaran.

SEREMBAN: Technical and vocational education and training (TVET), which emphasises skills, is a good option for furthering studies, said Human Resources Minister M Kula Segaran.

He said this was in line with the country’s aim to produce more skilled workers as currently the percentage of skilled workers stood at only 28% when the target by 2020 is 35%.

“Skills training is very important and the country’s progress depends on it.

“I hope our young will pick TVET as the first choice. Parents should not solely be looking at sending their children to universities because TVET is no less important,” he told reporters after attending a “Human resource ministry with the people” event in Rantau here today.

He also said involvement of the Chinese and Indian communities in TVET was rather lukewarm, standing at 1% and 5% respectively, and that the ministry was intensifying efforts to encourage higher participation from them as well as the Orang Asli community.

He added it was easy for TVET students to get jobs after completing their courses, citing the take-up rate now stood at 94%.

On other matters, Kula said the ministry held “Meet-the-Customer” sessions at its headquarters in Putrajaya every Tuesday from 8am to 10am, whereby not only top ministry officials would be present but he himself.

In conjunction with the progamme, the minister also made a walkabout at the new market in Rantau town.

Source: www.freemalaysiatoday.com/

Comment: If you are interested to pursue TVET education but do not know where to find these institutions, fill up your details here

RM2mil allocation for UCSF for skills training

KOTA KINABALU: University College Yayasan Sabah (UCSF) received a RM2 million allocation from the Implementation Coordination Unit (ICU) of the Prime Minister’s Department for its skills training programmes in the State. ICU Director-General Datuk Zolkopli Dahalan said the allocation was included in the 11th Malaysia Plan (RMK11) and his department fully supported UCSF’s efforts to attract the younger generation, especially those side-lined by mainstream education, to receive skills training which would enable them to earn a living and contribute to the economic development of the State and country.“If the programme shows a good outcome, then it may be continued in the next Malaysia Plan. This kind of training is good and I can see some of the work of trainees have already achieved international standards, so this work is something to be proud of and should be continued.” He said this to reporters after officiating the closing ceremony of the Borneo Art Newcomers (Banco) 2019, here, Thursday.

Asked whether similar programmes can be set up in other parts of the country, Zolkopli agreed and said he also welcomed other states to implement similar training programmes for school students not able to pursue their education to a higher level.“Of course, there are also side-lined youths in other states. But it is up to those respective states to take the effort to provide the opportunity for similar skills training for their youths so they can also improve their standard of living,” he said. 

A total of 70 trainees under the Sabah Native Special Programme 2018, who completed their visual arts, visual art sculptures and botanical batik creative arts short-term courses, also received their course certificate. UCSF Vice-Chancellor Dr Mohamed Haleem Mohamed Razi, in his speech, said UCSF hoped the course can be continued and expanded to reach out to more youths in the State where he said such training will assist and expand the talents and skills of youth trainees in line with the Government’s efforts to develop the State. 

Source: http://www.dailyexpress.com.my

Comment: Every now and then, we see news of funds going to public TVET colleges or in this case, University College. What about the private sector? How much is the allocation from PTPK??
Is it enough for the private TVET colleges & institutes?

We will all know by end of the month but I highly suspect, it’s not gonna be enough, many of them either got to downsize, cease operation or if they want to survive, got to think creatively how to pull through this tough period.

Funding essential for B40 group to benefit from TVET training

Bernama pic)

There has been a lot of talk of the new Malaysian Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) Roadmap.

However, there are plenty of unanswered questions in relation to the direction of TVET, although these programmes benefit the B40 the most.

Firstly, there is no single body in charge and TVET courses are provided by a couple of ministries.

This has resulted in different standards set by each of these ministries, although the human resources minister is supposed to head this.

Secondly, what skills are expected of a TVET graduate? Currently, students enrolled in the Sijil Kemahiran Malaysia (SKM) programme largely comprise of very low achievers at school. Some are hardly able to read and write.

With the development of technology and the coming of Industry 4.0, the industry expects graduates with innovative and higher-order thinking skills.

But school-leavers with these skills do not consider TVET as a study option and go on to take up degree courses.

These conflicting issues need to be addressed before students are counselled to take up TVET courses, so they are clear on their expectations.

Next, it is getting very difficult to promote TVET courses to school-leavers because they perceive TVET courses lead to low-level and lowly-paid jobs — those equated with cheap foreign labour.

The government needs to address this perception. Teachers also need to be educated on these possible high-paying jobs.

Having addressed the above, the next biggest issue is the demand for skilled workers. We understand that there are more than two million foreign workers who are either semi-skilled or unskilled working in this country.

So, what is the policy on the dependence on foreign workers and the subsequent replacement with a more locally-skilled workforce?

Assuming these two million foreign labourers are to be replaced with local TVET graduates over the next 10 years, wouldn’t that mean about 200,000 TVET students have to be trained annually? How are we going to do this?

Currently, skills training is provided by both the public and private institutions. It is very important that the government makes clear the role of the private sector in meeting the demand for training.

The survival, sustainability and investments by private skills training institutions greatly depends on a clear policy by the government.

Due to neglected funding, quite a number of private training institutions have ceased operations. Surely the human resources minister must realise that without proper funding, it is virtually impossible for the B40 lower-income populace to afford education.

The private training institutions have the capacity to meet the training needs of half the above demand. But the question is the funding.

It is a known fact that the majority of students who enrol in these skills programmes belong to the B40 group and would be heavily dependent on the funding.

The government needs to allocate the required funds or loans to cater for the underprivileged.

In conclusion, the TVET curriculum needs to be relooked to meet emerging technological changes.

Developing local human capital should take precedence in meeting the industry demands rather than being overly dependent on foreign labour.

To make this happen, the quota system of funding must cease, thus enabling all qualified students to pursue skills courses. This should be taken as a national agenda.

If this is not addressed, we will have to face the consequences of national socio-economic problems, thus affecting the future growth of the country.

Assoc Prof Elajsolan Mohan is the president of the National Association of Private Educational Institutions (Napei).

Source: https://www.freemalaysiatoday.com

Comment: Yes, I agree that the private institutions be given more, if not equal funding vs government institutions. However, things are not moving that way, thus far.
Perhaps, it’s also time that private institutions be more creative in packaging their education but must be careful in not going against the Act 652 (National Skills Development Act).


I’ve seen how some of these private institutions done in a way that benefit the students, industry & themselves!
So, students, if you have problem getting into public institutions or having financial constraints with your fees but yet interested with skills courses, fill up the form here.

Skills Training Can Help Lessen Dependence On Foreign Labour

KUALA LUMPUR — Malaysia’s dependency on foreign labour can be reduced by increasing skills training for locals, said Deputy Human Resource Minister Datuk Seri Ismail Abd Muttalib.

He said by increasing the number of skills training institutes and raising the skill levels of Malaysians to professional standards, it would help produce workers of quality.

“It is also in line Malaysia’s goal of having 35 per cent skilled workers in the labour force by 2020, he said.

He told this to BERNAMA after attending an Iftar event organised by Perbadanan Tabung Pembangunan Kemahiran in Kuala Lumpur, Tuesday night.

Ismail added that foreign workers registered with the Immigration Department numbered some 1.9 million people, mainly from Bangladesh, the Philippines and Myanmar.

Source: BERNAMA