Tag Archives: SKM

Certification-level training for Drone Piloting on the way

School leavers with the ambition of becoming professional drone pilots can soon take a course on Drone Piloting under a vocational programme at colleges and polytechnics around the country.

The Department of Skills Development under the Ministry of Human Resources recently launched the Malaysia National Occupational Skills Standards (NOSS) for the piloting of Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) or Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV), popularly referred to as ‘Drones’’.

With the launch of this standard,  vocational and private educational institutions can now offer Drone Piloting courses under the Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) programme and be awarded the SKM (Sijil Kemahiran Malaysia) or a Malaysia Skills Certificate

At the moment, several private organisations have been offering courses in various aspects of drone operation; for mapping, facilities inspection, progress report (for property developers and construction projects), film and drama production, news, the acquisition of aerial footage and photographs.

These courses last from two days (for basic operation of a drone) to a few days covering the various aspects of drone piloting for specific purposes such as mapping.

Before the launch of the NOSS Standard, formal government-recognised certification for drone piloting courses were not available for the aspiring pilot.

As the usage of drones expands, beyond a hobby to industrial use, the need for trained pilots who have gone through structured instructions based on an accepted and recognised national standards, become increasingly pressing.  

Especially now that the word ‘drone’ appears in the media daily from all over the world; both negative and positive news.

But it is always the negative aspects that capture the public’s imagination and it is up to the industry to dispel negativity and myths that surround drones.

One positive effort is the adoption of formalised training for drone operators; people who not only know how to operate them safely within the limitations of each type of craft but who are also aware of the legal and regulatory requirements in the operation of drones.

Sometime in 2017, Malaysia Unmanned Drones Activist Society (MUDAS), a non-governmental organisation devoted to the development and advancement of drones in the country, initiated discussions with the Department of Skills Development or Jabatan Pembangunan Kemahiran (JPK) to develop a formal curriculum for the training of drone pilots under the vocational programmes of the many polytechnics and colleges spread throughout the country.

MUDAS is a non-governmental organisation devoted to the development and advancement of drones in the country.

L – R: Khairul Arriffin Aziz, CEO AECA Solutions William Alvisse, MUDAS Executive Secretary Mohd Noor Rahim, MUDAS Deputy Chairman, Hj Zaid bin Mat San, Deputy Director Curriculum Unit, NOSS 
(Photo by Haidar Abu Bakar)

The NGO has been in the forefront of promoting dialogue with government agencies that are involved in regulating and controlling the nation’s airspace, the Civil Aviation Authority of Malaysia (CAAM), the Jabatan Ukur dan Pemetaan Negara (JUPEM), the survey and mapping department, which has traditionally been the authority overseeing aerial photography, especially mapping because of its implications on national security, and other organisations that have direct and indirect interests in the operation of ‘drones’.

“MUDAS initiated contact with JPK in late 2017 to moot the idea of drone pilot training under the National Occupational Skills Standard (NOSS) programme,” said Executive Secretary William Alvisse.

“In mid-2018 an expert panel was formed comprising of representatives from  CAAM, Jupem and MCMC (Malaysian Communications and Multimedia Commission) to create the current Curriculum,” Alvisse added.

Husni Faiz, a graduate of Electrical Power Engineering and a full-time pilot under BIP Studio and drone piloting trainer welcomes the NOSS Standards.

Husni Faiz, professional drone pilot and trainer

“It’s vital for those intending to be professional drone pilots undergo formal training such as the structure that is recommended in the NOSS standard.

“While recreational flyers may not need the entire course structure, it would be a good idea if parts or modules of that could be offered to training companies to train the hobbyists and recreational flyers,”  he added.

Husni also trains pilots under his Akufly Academy.

“Having the NOSS training standard is good for the industry, said Kamarul A Muhamed, CEO of the Aerodyne Group.

Kamarul A Muhamed CEO Aerodyne Group

Aerodyne operates in 11 countries and is regarded as the premier drone services company, providing integrated managed solutions for the petroleum, civil engineering and facilities industry.

It employs 300 people, 1/3rd of whom are drone pilots.

“A structured drone piloting course will increase the level of competence and will lead to better safety and quality of operations,” he added.

Currently, Aerodyne trains its local pilots locally and in-house following the structure set by training schools in the UK and Australia where some of their pilots and trainers have been trained. The company then structure their training based on the training syllabus of these schools.

The Aerodyne pilots operating in their international markets are trained at authorised training schools for certifications should this be available in that particular country.

As a renowned global drone services company, recruitment isn’t an issue with many would-be pilots clamouring to join the group.

“The challenge, however, is in getting good technical pilots with the right mentality for enterprise-level work,” Kamarul said.

Kamarul lists technical ability, having a global mindset, the ability to communicate well and good and diligent in report writing, and problem-solving skills as the key factors he looks for in a candidate.

Drone Academy Asia provides training for drone operators and its graduates receive a “globally recognised DJI certificate”.

A representative of the academy said that they believe a formalised course structure is needed for the industry and that they are studying the NOSS standard and framework.

Located at the Cyberjaya Innovation Hub, Drone Academy offers courses in Aerial Mapping and Surveying, Precise Aerial Mapping and a Human Resource Development Fund (HRDF) claimable Professional Drone Operator course. 

The idea for a structured course, leading to certification is to produce well trained and competent workforce to meet the requirements of drone service companies to handle flights for mapping, facilities and structure monitoring, agriculture to name just three areas where drones are being increasingly used.

“There are two levels, Level 2 and 3 with 1,200 hours and 1,300 hours of training respectively,” said Alvisse.

“Upon completion of the training, candidates will be awarded an SKM (Sijil Kemahiran Malaysia) certificate,” Alvisse added. 

“Just a word of caution though,” Kamarul said.

“In the long term drone piloting will be limited in requirements as the industry moves into pilotless autonomous operation.”

Which will then necessitate an overhaul of the training syllabus?

Source: Citizen Journalist Malaysia

NST Leader: TVET – Big room for improvement

(File pix) Only 13 per cent of all upper secondary students are pursuing TVET courses, while merely nine per cent are doing them at polytechnics. Pix by NSTP/Aizuddin SaadBy New Straits Times – June 11, 2019 @ 12:01am

THE world of technical and vocational education and training (TVET) is one of paradoxes and other mind bogglers.

Five thousand TVET and science places are waiting to be filled, yet there are no takers. Puzzlingly, too, TVET grad employability is a very high 95 per cent versus tertiary institution grad employability of an average of 80 per cent.

This the parents and students do not know, says Education Minister Dr Maszlee Malik. Little wonder, only 13 per cent of all upper secondary students are pursuing TVET courses, while merely nine per cent are doing them at polytechnics.

A 2018 report by Khazanah Research Institute (KRI) on The School-To-Work Transition of Young Malaysians lends support to the minister’s claim.

The report quotes job seekers as saying TVET to be the most useful qualification for getting a good job. Yet — here comes another mind boggler — TVET is not a popular education pathway. As Maszlee says, there may need to be a deeper analysis. We agree.

Perhaps, the problem may not be in TVET itself, but in everything associated with it. This maze must be untangled. Consider this.

There are more than 1,000 public and private TVET institutions — 565 public institutions under six ministries and 600 private institutions.

This causes a plethora of problems, says the KRI report. One such is a lack of strategic coordination. This should have been to some extent solved by the Malaysia Board of Technologies — a governance and certification body — launched on Nov 17, 2016. But fragmentation continues. The puzzle thickens.

“Low wages” appear to be standing in the way of TVET, too. To Maszlee, this is a perception problem. It may very well be. And can be solved with some generous dose of awareness.

Remuneration is based on TVET skills acquired and as the skills are upgraded along with the experience gained, salary tends to move up.

But there is hope yet. Maszlee says a cabinet-level committee is hard at work consolidating resources as well as synchronising efforts to ensure stronger branding, more effective governance, funding and accreditation structures to make TVET a primary choice for students.

We will hold our horses until the more “sexy” TVET arrives. Part of this reform involves making the TVET industry responsive, according to deputy director-general at the Education Ministry’s Polytechnic and Community College Education Department, Dr Mohammad Naim Yaakub.

The idea is, he says, to make supply match demand by way of artificial intelligence and big data. This has been the experience of many European countries. European countries have skewed their skills development policy towards encouraging such a match.

KRI sees competency-based training as critical to TVET reform. This allows for the design of practical, demand-driven courses for industry needs.

Competency-based TVET uses short modular courses geared to market industry demand, enabling students to enter the market with a defined set of skills.

Modular courses also come with additional advantages: they promote lifelong learning and are less time-intensive. The rest of the world is heading towards short “nano degrees”. We should too.

RELATED STORIES

Riot dismisses claims that TVET problematic, not systematic

TVET, a relevant choice

Source: www.nst.com.my/opinion/leaders/2019

Comment: Again, would like to point out that one factor that maybe left out is the fact that current Sijil Kemahiran Malaysia (SKM) & Diploma Kemahiran Malaysia (DKM) holders are facing stumbling block in furthering their study to higher education due to SPM qualification issues, ie passing BM & History and/or with 3 credits as per required by MQA.

Tawaran Kursus SKM Julai 2019 di Kolej Yayasan Felda Mempaga & Kolej Yayasan Felda Jempol

Kursus yang ditawarkan:

1. Perhotelan
2. Kulinari
3. Pastri
4. Pengurusan Pejabat
5. Dialisis
6. Jahitan pakaian wanita
6. Jahitan pakaian lelaki
7.Diploma pengurusan fesyen dan pakaian tahap 4

➡Kelebihan Program:
✅ Tempoh pengajian bermula dari 3 bulan sehingga 18 bulan bergantung pd kursus
✅ Penginapan asrama percuma, makan minum percuma
✅ Yuran yang berpatutan (Serendah RM350 sehingga RM750) mengikut kursus

▶Syarat Kelayakan :
✔18 tahun-35 tahun
✔Boleh membaca dan menulis Bahasa Melayu
✔Lepasan SPM
✔Bumiputera

Sila hubungi : isma 0125613557

Jika anda tidak memenuhi mana-mana syarat kelayakan di atas, ingin belajar kursus kemahiran & sanggup buat pinjaman PTPK atau bayar sendiri, boleh mohon kursus kemahiran TVET/SKM di sini

Chinese independent secondary school students can train at 32 institutes and get certificates, says HR minister

Human Resource Minister M. Kulasegaran speaks to reporters at a press conference in Subang Jaya January 18, 2019. ― Picture by Hari Anggara
Human Resource Minister M. Kulasegaran speaks to reporters at a press conference in Subang Jaya January 18, 2019. ― Picture by Hari Anggara

KUALA LUMPUR, May 23 — Technical and vocational stream students in Chinese independent secondary schools (CIS) may join training programmes at the 32 training institutes under the Manpower Department and receive the Malaysia Skills Certificates.

Human Resource Minister M. Kula Segaran said the ministry would also offer the vocational training officer (VTO) course to technical and vocational education and training (TVET) trainers from schools that meet the terms and conditions set by the Skills Development Department.

“The ministry may allow students from schools under Dong Zong to attend training programmes at 23 industrial training institutes (ITI), eight advanced technology training centres (ADTEC) and a Japanese-Malaysian technical institute through an aptitude test.

“The ministry can also award the Level 3 Malaysia skills certificate and Level 4 Malaysia skills diploma to TVET trainers via recognition of prior achievements,” he told reporters after the signing of a memorandum of understanding (MoU) between the ministry and Dong Zong in Kajang near here.

He said the ministry would also consider applications for loans or scholarships to eligible students to further their studies in TVET, VTO and other programmes.

Kula Segaran said the move to provide opportunities for CIS was important to fill the lack of non-Malay participation in TVET institutions, as well as to meet labour market needs.

Meanwhile, Dong Zong chairman Tan Tai Kim said TVET education began in 1987 at CIS and presently, 19 such schools were offering the programme involving 2,046 students.

“But the students faced a setback as the vocational certificates were not recognised, so with the signing of the MoU, the students are hopeful of pursuing their ambition,” he said.

Besides allowing the students to continue their studies at the manpower department’s training institutes, the MoU would also help Dong Zong gear the CIS towards recognition as registered training centres under the skills development department.

Kula Segaran said a proposal for all ITIs to stay open until 11 pm for the public to attend classes and continue their studies in TVET after office hours and on weekends and public holidays, was being studied. — Bernama

Dual certification in digital marketing

Students undergo experiential learning at the ICT lab and gain technical skills in digital marketing at BTVET College.

DIGITAL marketing is essential in the growth and development of any business today. With that, BERJAYA TVET College (BTVET), through its Centre for Technology and Innovation (CTI), officially launched its first certified training programme in Digital Marketing.

BTVET’s Digital Marketing Certification Programme is said to be power-packed with intensive modules that incorporate real-world “DigiM-Technopreneur” experiences and successful business case studies. It is designed to equip SPM school leavers with practical skills in becoming professional digital marketers.

The Certificate in Digital Marketing programme was made possible through the collaborative efforts between BTVET and Digital Marketing Consultant (DMC). The programme which runs for 12 months includes a four-month internship placement. “Upon completion of this programme, students will receive dual certification from both organisations. These enhance job employability in this current digital era and propels a student in becoming digital entrepreneurs,” said BERJAYA TVET College president, Kanendran T. Arulrajah.

Additionally, the CTI offers other TVET (Technical and Vocational Education and Training) programmes, which include the Certificate (Sijil Kemahiran Malaysia) in Information Technology and Diploma Kemahiran Malaysia in Web Development. These are recognised by the Ministry of Human Resources. The programmes focus on experiential learning and use the “Vocational-Industry Connectivity” approach, which teach pragmatic skill-based enhancement modules at both Certificate and Diploma levels.

There is also the Advanced Diploma in IT and Support Systems, City and Guilds (UK), which encompasses 16 months of study and eight months of internship. This course is globally recognised and provides students with the opportunity to pursue Degree programmes abroad.

Aditionally, there is the Skills Proficiency Certificate in Office Applications for IT, City and Guilds (UK), for those seeking vocational training, ideal for working adults seeking international certification. The course is open to special needs’ students, who will then be offered IT courses according to their interests, gradually.

BTVET also collaborates with Orade, a “smart partners”, and incorporates Orade modules in its curriculum. This helps develop students in becoming “skill-based techno-practitioners”, in demand in the IT industry.

At last year’s Malaysia Abilympics Competition, BTVET was represented by three students who competed in three different IT categories. Adam Abd Rahman, aged 19, took home the first prize in Data Processing while Mak Sai Wah came in second in Word Processing. The competition was organised by The Malaysian Council for Rehabilitation (MCR).

Source: https://www.thesundaily.my

Comment: In case you’re unaware, qualified students (esp from B40 category) can apply for loan from Perbadanan Tabung Pembangunan Kemahiran (PTPK).
For your information, many JPK Accredited Centres were unable to get loan quota from PTPK for 2019. Should you require more information about courses offered by BTVET, you may reach us at 012-3123430 or email us at tvetuni@gmail.com or reqister your interest here for other TVET courses.

UPSI is first public university to offer TVET graduates to further studies

Universiti Pendidikan Sultan Idris (UPSI) has emerged as the first public university to offer the opportunity to technical and vocational education and training (TVET) graduates to continue their studies.By Basir Zahrom – 
February 20, 2018 @ 9:39pm

KUALA LUMPUR: Universiti Pendidikan Sultan Idris (UPSI) has emerged as the first public university to offer the opportunity to technical and vocational education and training (TVET) graduates to continue their studies.

UPSI vice-chancellor Prof Datuk Dr Mohammad Shatar Sabran, said the first cohort have already registered early this month, involving 20 vocational college and skills training public institutes.

He said, in order to create more flexibility with regards to entrance opportunities while still meeting quality standards set by the Malaysian Qualifications Agency (MQA), UPSI is opening the door to TVET students who obtain a Malaysia Vocational Diploma (DVM) and Malaysian Skills Diploma (DKM) with an overall minimum GPA of 3.66 at Malaysian Vocational Certificate (SVM) level.

“Those who fail to meet the minimum requirements such as the History subject, can sit for the paper on their own or take the subject, equivalent to the SPM.

“TVET graduates who wish to continue their studies in UPSI have to pass the Malaysian University English Test (MUET) at Band 2 and pass Band 3 to graduate, as well as pass the Malaysian Educators Selection Inventory (MedSi) test, as well as an interview,” he said.

Previously, vocational college students had to have a two-year working experience in order to obtain the Accreditation of Prior Experiential Learning (APEL) certificate from MQA to enable them to continue their studies to Bachelor’s Degree.

As such, UPSI’s offer opens the door to more opportunities to vocational college students to continue their studies at degree level without having to possess an APEL certificate, but only meet SVM requirements.

The move is in line with the establishment of UPSI’s Technical and Vocational Faculty campus in Teluk Intan in 2019.

He said, for the first cohort, the learning opportunity covers Bachelor’s Degree in Agricultural Science, Home Economics, Design and Technology, as well as Human Resources Management.

For diploma level, there is a minimum 2.5 CGPA requirement, which is on par with Level 4 of the Malaysian qualifications framework, as well as meet other requirements such as a pass in Bahasa Melayu, as well as a pass or credit in History at SPM level.

Source: www.nst.com.my (February 20, 2018 )

Comment: Believe that many TVET/SKM holders are still unaware of the opportunities to further their study to Universities, IPTA or IPTS.
Some critics may say tertiary (Degree, Masters, PhD) paper qualification does not guarantee you success in your career, actual fact is that it does really help to build and enhance your critical thinking skills. And with just a technical skills qualifications, how far can you go?
But it’s different if you have technical skills and then combined with management skills (and paper qualification), you will rise@URISE up in your career. And along with it a better quality of life for your family and maybe higher social status (as opposed to just a technician).
You are well aware that there are just too many fresh graduates out there who can’t get a job or decent job because they don’t have the right skills to match the industry.


BUT YOU CAN BE DIFFERENT! Skills professional with competency & management skills, the WORLD is YOURS!

SIGN UP HERE

TAWARAN PENINGKATAN TAHAP SKM (Selangor)

Jika anda adalah pelatih SKM Tahap 2/3 yang telah tamat dan tidak berpeluang belajar di mana-mana kolej swasta atau awam untuk menyambung ke tahap 3/4 bagi kursus-kursus berikut:
Kursus Juruteknik Elektrik Tahap 3
• Kursus Penyejukbekuan dan Penyaman Udara Tahap 3
• Kursus Sistem Komputer Tahap 4 (Diploma)
• Kursus Sistem Maklumat Tahap 3 dan 4 (Diploma)
• Kursus Juru kecantikan Tahap 3

Inilah PELUANG anda.

Pendaftaran pengambilan April/Mei 2019

▶ Syarat Kemasukan; Umur 18 – 35 Tahun

Pinjaman Latihan Kemahiran Disediakan Untuk Generasi Belia Melalui Perbadanan Tabung Pembangunan Kemahiran (PTPK) Di Bawah Kementerian Sumber Manusia

▶ Syarat-syarat penjamin:

Penjamin mestilah berumur 60 kebawah

Pendapatan kasar ibu bapa di bawah RM8000.00 sebulan

Kelebihan:

Duit Sara Diri RM400 Dipinjamkan oleh PTPK Kepada Setiap Pelajar Yang Mengikuti Kursus Tersebut.

Asrama & pengangkutan ada disediakan

Pelajar Yang Tamat Kursus Akan Ditempatkan Bekerja Dengan Syarikat Yang Bekerjasama Dengan Pusat Bertauliah.

Sila isi Borang Tunjuk Minat sekiranya anda memenuhi semua kriteria di atas.

Kuota Pinjaman Tabung Pembangunan Kemahiran (PTPK) 2019 – Siapa Dapat, Siapa Tak Dapat?

Ya, keputusan yang dinanti-nantikan oleh banyak pengusaha Pusat Bertauliah (terutamanya swasta) dan lebih ramai lagi, para pelajar yang amat memerlukan pinjaman PTPK untuk menyambung pendidikan mereka supaya berdaya saing di alam pekerjaan kelak.

Jika anda pelajar yang ingin tahu samada Pusat Latihan/Bertauliah JPK yang anda ingin daftar betul-betul dapat kuota, sila rujuk sini (SKM 1-3) & sini (DKM 4 & DLKM 5). Harap maklum bahawa Pusat Bertauliah yang tidak dapat kuota boleh buat rayuan & dapat kuota kemudian. Jika anda tidak pasti pusat mana yang tawarkan kursus apa, boleh dapat & isi borang permohonan ringkas di sini.

Bagi Pusat Bertauliah JPK yang berjaya dapat kuota PTPK 2019, TAHNIAH!
Sekarang sudah boleh rancang & hantar pengajar/personel anda untuk kursus-kursus induksi (khususnya PP-PPD-PPB) & VTO sekiranya personel anda telah berhenti kerja sebelum ni kerana risau Pusat Bertauliah anda tidak dapat kuota dari PTPK.

Bagi mereka yang ingin tahu peluang yang ada dalam sektor TVET ataupun ingin jadi Pegawai Pengesah Luaran (PPL), kursus ni juga WAJIB untuk hadir

Dan jika anda adalah Pusat Bertauliah JPK yang pentauliahannya masih aktif tapi nak jual disebabkan tiada kuota PTPK, nak bersara dsgbnya, sila hubungi min kerana ada yang minat nak beli PB sedia ada, terutamanya di kawasan Lembah Klang.

NOTA: Kursus-kursus lain (VTO & Induksi):

1. PPL: 27-28 April
2. PP-PPT: 29-30 Jun

Tempat: I Smart Educare, Kepong Metro Prima, KL
Masa: 8.30-5pm
3. VTO (Pengambilan hujung Mei/Jun) – 360jam hujung minggu, 720jam di PB masing-masing

Syarat Kelayakan PP, PPD, PPB

Kerap juga min ditanya, apa syarat PP, PPD & PPB (terutamanya dari pusat latihan yang ingin tubuhkan Pusat Bertauliah). Harap ini dapat memberi gambaran yang jelas, tak perlu tanya min lagi 😀

Yang tak tahu apa tu Sijil Kemahiran Malaysia (SKM) atau cara nak dapatkan SKM, sila baca lebih lanjut di sini.

Yang nak tahu apa tu Sijil Pengajar Vokasional@VTO, sila baca sini pula

Poor SPM Results? Here’s What You Can Do Next To Further Your Education

So, the day of reckoning is over and you’ve gotten your SPM results.

If your results aren’t as you expected, or if you fell short on some subjects that you thought you could have scored, it’s okay to feel gloomy or guilty that you didn’t utilise more of your time to study.

But after a week of being down in the dumps, it’s probably time for you to pick yourself up again. After all, SPM is just a small test in the grand scheme of things. Chances are, no one is going to harass you about it before the year ends.

So instead of crying about it, here are 5 things you can do if your SPM results are not as good as you anticipated.

#1. Appeal your grades

Poor spm result what to do next - 1 Appeal your grades

If you are seeking to meet the entry requirements for your desired pre-university course, or if you think your grades are right below the borderline to a higher grade, you can try getting your paper marked again.

With a fee to part with (RM100 per subject), you can have your papers remarked and hopefully (fingers crossed!), you will be able to attain a higher grade that will open doors to various opportunities.

To submit an appeal, you will need to fill up a form called Borang Permohonan Penyemakan Semula Keputusan Peperiksaan/Kes T, which is on the Board of Examination Malaysia (Lembaga Peperiksaan Malaysia) website. You can also find it at any of these places:

  • Your school
  • Assessment and Examination Unit / Sector (Sektor / Unit Penilaian dan Peperiksaan)
  • State Department of Education (Jabatan Pendidikan Negeri)
  • Examination review counter in the Board of Examination Malaysia in Putrajaya (Kaunter Semak Semula Lembaga Peperiksaan Putrajaya)

You need to make sure that your form reaches the Board of Examination Malaysia’s office within 30 days after SPM results are announced or else it will not be processed. Your reviewed results will be posted to you 2 months after the appeal deadline. Ensure that you attach the following required documents:

  • verified copy of your official SPM 2018 results
  • verified certificate or copy of your pentaksiran berdasarkan sekolah (PBS) or school-based assessments by your school principal or Pegawai Kerajaan Kumpulan A

*Incomplete forms will not be processed.

#2. Retake your subjects

Poor spm result what to do next - 2 Retake your subjects

If you are not confident that having your papers reviewed will improve your grades, or if you want to aim for a higher grade, perhaps you can choose to resit your papers.

For a step-by-step guide on repeating your SPM subjects, click here.

Do note that for SPM Ulangan in Junethere are only 3 subjects that you can register for. These include:

  • Mathematics
  • Bahasa Melayu
  • Sejarah

If you’d like to retake papers for other subjects, you will need to register as an SPM private candidate and sit for the papers with the rest of the present year SPM students in November / December.

You will need to consider this option thoroughly as it will take another year for you to obtain better grades. By then, your peers may have already completed a year of their pre-university studies so be sure to make it count!  

Resitting papers is usually for students who are looking to enter specific pre-university or degree courses. So if you are looking to study a foundation course and you’re just shy of one credit, this is an option you can consider!

#3. Pursue diploma or certificate courses

Poor spm result what to do next - 3 Pursue diploma or certificate courses

If you’re missing a couple of credits from your SPM slip, you can also consider other pathways, such as pursuing a diploma or certificate. After all, they can still lead you to selected degree courses.

For a start, a diploma only requires 3 credits at SPM. Upon completion, you can then progress to the second year of a relevant degree. This makes your total study duration similar to taking a foundation then a degree.

Certificate courses, on the other hand, typically require only 1 credit, as long as you pass Bahasa Melayu and History. Completing a certificate will allow you to progress to a diploma and subsequently a degree.

So if you think retaking your papers will not change your grades, you may consider these alternatives, provided that you meet the entry requirements.

#4. Pursue skills/TVET certificate & diploma courses

If you don’t have enough credits but intend to pursue an academic diploma, some University or University Colleges also accept Sijil Kemahiran Malaysia (SKM) as an entrance requirement.

No worries, if you don’t have any credit or worse still, failed in your SPM (parents force you to complete SPM despite your interest is in skills based programs), you can always pursue your interest in skills/TVET courses.

Remember, pursuing skills/TVET courses should not be your last resort but must be your interest. Studies has shown that graduates with skills are much more employable – 80 to 90 per cent of them are able to get a job after six months upon graduation (vs graduates from academic background. Those taking cert/diploma/degree in business studies, marketing, information technology, social science courses will find it hard to land a job, unlike those who take Technical and Vocational Education Training (TVET) courses.

#5. Contact us

If you are undecided on what course or where to pursue your TVET/skills courses, you can get in touch with us here or call us at +6012 3123430. We will be happy to help!

At the end of the day, it doesn’t matter if your SPM results are good or bad because it’s not the end of the road yet. There are still plenty of things you can do to secure your future. Many have managed to become successful, even without a string of As.

Credit: https://eduadvisor.my (Points 1-3 are from them)