Tag Archives: Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET)

Budget focus of Human Resources Ministry on TVET

Human Resources Minister M. Kulasegaran.

IPOH: The focus of the Human Resources Ministry’s budget will be on Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) to meet the demands for future human capital.

“We need to empower institutions at this crucial stage to produce the future workforce,” its minister M. Kulasegaran said after attending a meeting with NGOs, Tamil School activitists, PTA and school representatives, here today.

“I am specifically pleased that the budget included the concern for developing future jobs as part of the advent of the Fourth Industrial Revolution, as the world moves towards automation and demands for a highly skilled work force.

“Without a doubt we need to embrace technology and automation if we want to remain competitive and the 2019 Budget will be address these issues.”

Kulasegaran also welcomed the double tax deduction for private sector companies that support the development of human capital, especially through TVET.

“The ministry will collaborate with the private sector to ensure senior citizens who want to work following the inclusion of new tax incentives to hire them,” he said.

“It is a relief to the B40 groups as the government will continue and improve the living assistance to them by providing more targeted assistance.

“Through the Human Resources Development Fund, the government will implement apprenticeship and graduate enhancement programme for employability.”

Kulasegaran said this is meant to provide skills to school-leavers and to increase the marketability of graduates.

http://www.thesundaily.my

Vocational training needs one authority, says minister

KAJANG: A single authority is needed to oversee the coordination of the Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) programme, said Permatang Pauh MP Nurul Izzah Anwar.

Nurul Izzah, who is Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) task force chairman, said she proposed for a TVET commission to be set up in Parlia­ment and for the Department of Skills Development (DSD) to be more empowered.

This is to ensure that DSD can compel any TVET institution under any ministry to meet the stipulated requirements or face closure.

“If you don’t have a single authority or regulatory body, you will never get anywhere,” she said at the Empowering Women Summit 2018 at Universiti Tenaga Nasional here yesterday.

This comes after reports that the TVET landscape was fragmented, with programmes offered by agencies under different ministries, state skills development centres and private institutions.

She said there was also a need to standardise qualifications of TVET graduates.

“We even have two different bodies (of certification), the Malaysian Qualifications Agency for academic qualifications and DSD for TVET graduates.”

Source: https://www.thestar.com.my

Malaysia facing shortage of motorcycle mechanics

By SHAHEERA AZNAM SHAH / Pic By ISMAIL CHE RUS

The motorcycle industry in the country is facing a shortage of highly-skilled technicians who are capable to operate the fourth industrial revolution (Industry 4.0) technology.

Hong Leong Yamaha Motor Sdn Bhd MD Datuk Jim Khor said motorcycle manufacturers are giving priority to technicians with skills beyond the common industry requirements.

“The motorcycle industry still lacks competent technicians, not just in Selangor, but throughout Malaysia.

“The industry is no longer seeking ordinary skills such as fixing or assembling a motorcycle, but also the skills to operate Industry 4.0 technology,” he said at the launch of the company’s Technician Apprenticeship Programme (TAP) in Shah Alam yesterday.

As such, Khor said Yamaha Motor has collaborated with INPENS International College to address the issue, and initiate an effective technical and vocational education and training (TVET) programme.

“The TAP programme will prepare the students with the new technologies and systems, as well as teach them how to incorporate the technologies into workshops and assembly factories,” he said.

Khor added that the programme would require six months of industrial training at Yamaha Motor’s branches across the country before the students could seek job opportunities elsewhere.

“The first batch that we took in September last year comprised eight students from INPENS. We will add another batch every six months.

“It will also depend on INPENS if they can provide excellent students who are qualified for this programme,” he said.

INPENS CEO Ahmad Zabri Mohd Yaman said the country needs talents with balanced academic and industrial skills to achieve a developed nation status.

“Initially, our institution has focused on students who are a little behind in their education — and at the same time, helping quality students who are interested in the TVET (sector).

“As for the first batch, we had provided Yamaha Motor with eight students. Moving forward, we expect to provide a maximum of 25 students,” he said, adding that technical professionals must be equally excellent in both the academic and technical aspects as part of the requirements in developed countries.

Meanwhile, Selangor Socio-Economic Empowerment and Development, and Caring Government Committee chairman V Ganabatirau said the programme is in line with the state government’s plan to reduce the unemployment rate in the country.

“The state government supports the learning institutions and private firms’ efforts to feed the human capital demand in industries, as the gap is still wide compared to developed countries.

“Also, learning institutions have to align the module and co-curriculum of TVET to the global industry growth, as well as position them to be industry- driven,” he said in his speech.

According to the Department of Statistics Malaysia, the unemployment rate in Selangor in 2017 has reduced to 2.8% from 3.2% in 2016.

Private TVET students can continue with studies after govt pumps in RM105m

Human Resources Minister M. Kulasegaran said RM105 million had been disbursed by the ministry to the 400 private TVET colleges in the country. — Picture by Marcus Pheong
Human Resources Minister M. Kulasegaran said RM105 million had been disbursed by the ministry to the 400 private TVET colleges in the country. — Picture by Marcus Pheong

LUMUT, Oct 20 — The 20,000 students from private Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges can continue with their studies after the Human Resources Ministry obtained RM140 million allocation from the Finance Ministry.

Human Resources Minister M. Kulasegaran said the funding was received recently and so far RM105 million had been disbursed by the ministry to the 400 private TVET colleges in the country.

“The delay in payments by Skills Development Fund Corp (PTPK) was funding in the corporation was running low,” he said.

Speaking to reporters here today after opening Dr VVV Menon community hall at Sri Ramar Temple in the Lumut Naval Base here, the Ipoh Barat MP explained that when PTPK was set up, it had a RM1 billion rotating fund.

“Annually, the government provides a grant of up to RM200 million to provide loans for the recipients mostly from the B40 (bottom 40th percentile) families,” he said.

“However, after graduating, they failed to repay their loans which affected the corporation’s operation,” he added.

He said the ministry was trying to get the defaulters, numbering up to a staggering 130,000, to pay up.

“The corporation has set up a call centre manned by 200 people to call the defaulters and remind them to pay up their loans,” he added, noting that he was also contemplating asking Prime Minister Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamed to write a letter to the defaulters and ask them to perform their civic duty.

“If the defaulters do not pay, it will be difficult for the corporation to continue giving loans to incoming trainees,” he said.

On October 9, Malay Mail reported that more than 20,000 students from private Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges may be forced to discontinue their studies due to inadequate allocations to the Skills Development Fund Corp (PTPK).

The Federation of JPK Accredited Centres (FeMAC) said these students are largely from the bottom 40th percentile (B40) and have no other means to pay for their courses without the PTPK loans.

FeMAC also complained that over the last four years, the Human Resources Ministry has been consistently reducing the allocation of funds for PTPK with the total amount of funds being cut being reduced by a staggering 60 per cent.

Private TVET centres can train between 40,000 and 60,000 students annually.

Comment: Am just wondering, it’s the borrower’s attitude that take things for granted where they think it’s ok not to repay back education loans or due to their low income status after graduation?

Source: https://www.malaymail.com

Tvet, a viable pathway

(File pix) Mohd Hazzerwan Mohd Hazzlee is collaborating with big names in fashion.

For many students, tertiary education is the ticket to good jobs, opening up opportunities to be successful in life.

Parents, teachers and society in general have ingrained this in children from a young age.

To graduate with a degree, students spend years learning in class which may leave them little time for internships to gain experience at the workplace. But in today’s competitive job market, practical experience is the number one quality employers look for in hires.

Although tertiary education has always been the top choice for many students, technical and vocational education and training (Tvet) offers a compelling career path especially for Sijil Pelajaran Malaysia (SPM) school-leavers.

Tvet graduate Mohd Hazzerwan Mohd Hazzlee, co-founder and creative director of Wan & Mary, said a vocational college education has helped him to realise his dream. The collection consists of arts and cultural elements which mix high fashion with street fashion to meet current trends.

The Diploma in Fashion Design graduate from Kolej Kemahiran Tinggi Mara Rembau (KKTMR) said: “I rejected offers of different courses from top public and private universities because I wanted to pursue something that I love—fashion and art.”

Mohd Hazzerwan later pursued the Degree in Fashion design course at Heriot Watt university of Edinburgh, United Kingdom.

“At first I was a bit hesitant to apply for the fashion course at KKTMR as the institution was new then and was taking in its first batch of students. But I am glad I took a chance.

“I had the most amazing experience at KKTMR. until now, the lecturers have been supportive as it is not easy being in the fashion industry.”

Having recently won a prize of RM100,000 in Gen F (generasi Fesyen), a programme for budding fashion designers, Mohd Hazzerwan is collaborating with big names in fashion.

He is excited at his latest partnership with Fashion valet for its ready-to-wear collection.

He is also preparing to make his debut at International Fashion Week next year in either London, Paris or Milan.

There has been growing concern over the rate of employability among fresh graduates, be it from local or private institutions. Students today may aspire to professions which may not be relevant to the country’s needs.

This may be due to lack of exposure and knowledge on the economic outlook in the country. Nevertheless, students have to plan their careers carefully.

TVET programmes are often deemed inferior to courses offered by private and local universities. It is unfortunate that there seems to be a stigma attached to those who pursue TVET. The younger generation needs to realise the importance of TVET and regard it as a viable pathway.

Associate Professor Dr Mohamad Sattar Rasul from the Department of Learning and Teaching Innovation (Technical and Vocational Education/Engineering Education) at Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia’s Faculty of Education said that this misconception of TVET is common among low academic achievers.

“We have heard success stories and achievements of TVET graduates who may earn more than degree holders,” he commented, adding that a teacher’s role is imperative to see TVET in a new light.

“It is essential to expose secondary school teachers to the TVET educational framework and career path. Teachers have to stop regarding TVET as the second or last option for SPM school-leavers.

“Our country’s TVET framework is unique where students have many course options. Those who do not do well academically have the chance to pursue higher education regardless of their SPM results.

“TVET in Malaysia must be revamped or remodelled after the German and Japanese curricula which are endorsed by the industry. Professional bodies in Malaysia need to step up and ensure the standard curriculum is in line with industry need. The curriculum here was developed by the board at an institution which sometimes does not cater to industry demand.”

The country needs a skilled workforce and innovators who possess a high creativity in utilising its resources for manufacturing and produce good services to compete globally.

“TVET is important is many ways especially in the economic and social context. The government has emphasised that TVET graduates are not job seekers but job creators. This will contribute to the country’s economic growth and the sustainability of our social context in handling future challenges.”

CAREER-READY

TVET offers a rich array of programmes in many fields including automotive, culinary arts, electronics, engineering, entrepreneurship and journalism. It involves learning in class and hands-on training, which provide knowledge and skills for employment.

TVET students are equipped with specific skills in a specific field. Early exposure to practical and on-the-job-training ready them for the workplace.

CKL Group of Companies, which is best known for its Lim Tayar car service centres, established School of Skills (SoS) to meet industrial need for local experts and skilled labour in the automotive industry. SoS aims to instil its students with real-world experience, ready for the workplace.

CKL Group of Companies, executive director Clement Lim said that SoS is important to produce skilled workers in the automotive sector.

“SoS acts as a self-mitigation tool for the company to alleviate dependency on foreign workers. We hope to nurture more talents and hone quality recruits for the industry.

“SoS offers programmes designed to give students the skills they need to become skilled and professional workers. The number of cars on the road is increasing, making the automotive field a big market. Hence, once students finish their studies at SoS, a job placement is guaranteed.”

SoS training department head Daneshwaran Krishnasamy said trained experts in all fields are in demand in the country.

“Our programmes boost skills and the workforce in the automotive field. By doing something practical and hands-on, we are able to draw out students’ interest easily. Many of our students, who did not perform well academically, are passionate when it comes to practical training.

“This industry is lacking in manpower. I used to work at BMW car services where the technicians were highly paid. Some were confident enough to leave and set up their own workshops for premium cars.

“The biggest advantage of SoS is its workshop where students spend most of their training hours. However, this school is not for Lim Tayar alone. After finishing their advanced diploma, students can apply for internships at any automotive workshops in the country,” he added.

SoS offers theoretical and practical training, and the work-integrated Train and Place programme, which involves four months of classroom-based learning followed by eight months of industry exposure.

UNIVERSITIES ARE NOT FOR EVERYONE

Generally, students go through 11 years of academic-based primary and secondary education.

Students who are not academically inclined can opt for vocational college as early as 16 years old upon completing Form Three.

Aiman Hakeem Aminuddin decided not to follow the mainstream path of applying to university despite scoring 8As in the SPM examination. The MRSM Tun Ghaffar student enrolled in the Diploma in Light Vehicle Maintenance course at SoS instead.

“I chose to pursue a TVET programme because I realised that picking up a skill benefits me in many ways, not only for future job prospects but also in my daily life.

“My family and I were going back to our hometown when the car tyre was punctured. Having learnt the skills in my diploma course, I was able to change the tyre without help,” he said.

“My parents convinced me to pursue a TVET programme. When the results for university applications were released, I did not even check mine as I was determined to study at a vocational college.

“Initially I had doubts after seeing my friends at university. Eventually, I don’t feel any different or left behind as knowledge can be obtained anywhere in any way possible.

“I am glad that I am pursuing my interest. Some students struggle to cope with their studies because they made the wrong choice.

“Some even fail.”

Source: https://www.nst.com.my

Ministry developing programmes to help technical students entry into TVET programmes

Deputy Education Minister Teo Nie Ching said that this was part of the government’s efforts to resolve the issue of accreditation of graduates from vocational colleges, which had deterred them from pursuing their education at institutes of higher learning. NSTP/ Asyraf Hamzah

KUALA LUMPUR: The Education Ministry is collaborating with the Malaysian Technical University Network (MTUN) to facilitate entry by Malaysian Diploma Vocational (MDV) students to Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) programmes.

Deputy Education Minister Teo Nie Ching said that this was part of the government’s efforts to resolve the issue of accreditation of graduates from vocational colleges, which had deterred them from pursuing their education at institutes of higher learning.

“MDV graduates can further their education to a bachelor’s degree at public institutes of higher learning (IPTA) and private institutes of higher learning (IPTS) on the account that their Malaysian Vocational Certificate is equivalent to 3 Credit Sijil Pelajaran Malaysia (SPM) as set by the Malaysian Examinations Syndicate.

“At this time, the ministry and the Malaysian Technical University Network is collaborating to develop a programme to strengthen their qualifications for TVET entry, especially for students from MDV.

“MDV graduates can also get jobs in industries subject to the terms and requirements of employers,” she said in reply to a question from Nurul Izzah Anwar (PH PKR-Permatang Pauh) during Questions and Answers session at the Dewan Rakyat today.

Teo said all MDV programmes by vocational colleges need to undergo accreditation by the Malaysian Qualifications Agency (MQA) and applications for 615 programmes had been received since June 2016.

She said out of that number, around 83 percent or 510 programmes have received temporary accreditation.

Teo said 428 programmes had been accepted for full accreditation, 12 programmes had received full accreditation and 54 programmes were in the process of fulfilling the conditions to obtain full accreditation.

She added 362 programmes were being evaluated in order to meet the requirements for full accreditation, which is expected to be finished by next year.

She said student entry into vocational colleges this year was 14,243 compared to 16,728 last year. Although the number had increased in 2013 from 15,916 to 18,022 (2014), it dropped to 17,544 in 2015 and 2016 (12,875).

https://www.nst.com.my

Hoping for higher allocation for TVET, athletes in Budget 2019, says youth minister

By NUR HAZIQAH A MALEK / Pic By ISMAIL CHE RUS

Greater focus on Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET), development of athletes and ways to reduce unemployment would likely be featured in the upcoming 2019 budget.

The Youth and Sports Ministry is already planning to reduce unemployment among youths to a single digit.

Its Minister Syed Saddiq Syed Abdul Rahman said there are many things on the ministry’s wishlist, but two specific items remain high on the agenda.

“In summary, I feel like there are needs to focus on allocation towards education which involves TVET and not merely tertiary education.

“I have brought this up to the Finance Ministry many times that the allocation for TVET must be enforced while the education and training itself must be industry-driven,” he said at the InvestSmart Fest 2018 in Kuala Lumpur last Friday.

He said TVET graduates of the Youth and Sports Skills Training Institute has an employment rate higher than 90%.

“Clearly, TVET is a training that makes graduates even more employable than those with a bachelor’s degree. The only thing left is to reinforce the training itself so that more people can join TVET,” he said.

He said by reinforcing education and training, the country can help youths from the bottom 40% households.

“We must also have an allocation to address the rate of youth unemployment. There must be an effort by all ministries to curb the issue and to reduce the rate of unemployment among youths to a single digit,” he said.

Some figures suggest youth unemployment rate stood at 10.85% last year, despite headline unemployment rate being 3.3%.

The Malaysian Reserve previously reported the high youth unemployment rate is backed by discriminating employers who prefer to hire foreign workers, as well as the increase in the number of graduates entering the job market.

Syed Saddiq said he would also like some allocation to be channelled for sportsmen and para-athletes.

“A higher allocation for sports is also required which is very important for both our athletes and paraathletes,” he said.

Meanwhile, InvestSmart Fest 2018 is an investor education initiative by the Securities Commission Malaysia (SC) aimed to promote awareness and knowledge on the Malaysian capital market to youth.

SC chairman Tan Sri Ranjit Ajit Singh said the SC has developed a mobile application game to introduce the foundation of capital market concepts to tech-savvy users.

“There is a perception that capital markets are intimidating or dry. We want to shift the perception and make learning more fun and enjoyable,” he said.

According to the Asian Institute of Finance, investments are not a priority for millennials, with only 41% out of 1,000 respondents say they diversify their investments and only 23% would invest more than 20% of their monthly income, while another 40% invest less than 10%.

Source: The Malaysian Reserve

TVET education at ILP for M’sians with SPM

Dr Rosnah presents a memento to Dr Teo.

MIRI: Enrolment into skill and vocational training institutions is for every Malaysian with SPM.

Director Dr Rosnah Muhamad Tahir said this while leading a team of officials from Industrial Training Institute (ILP) Miri on a courtesy call to Miri MP Dr Michael Teo at his service centre here yesterday,

“It is sad to say that the enrolment of Chinese is still low at the moment because of the wrong perception that it is only for Bumiputeras.”

According to Dr Rosnah there are about 20 Chinese students out of 102 students per intake. She hoped Dr Teo would promote and encourage parents to enrol their children into the institute.

Dr Rosnah said; “Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) is education and training which provides knowledge and skills.

“TVET is very important because the government wants to increase skilled workers from 28 to 35 per cent by 2020 and to spur economic growth. It also provides good and bright employment opportunity not only in the state or country as they could go beyond with their skills and experience.”

In this context, she advised SPM school leavers not to think only of starting salary as they must aim to acquire skills and experience required by the industry before getting better pay.

Local companies are also encouraged to hire more locals with skill and experience.

Dr Teo who acknowledged and recognised the importance of having skilled labour said he would appeal for more funding, including employing more lecturers for ILP Miri.

Source: http://www.theborneopost.com

In youth manifesto, BN pledges RM200m for ‘agropreneurs, seapreneurs’

10 April 2018
By Azril Annuar And Ida Nadirah Ibrahim

Barisan Nasional youth supporters wave placards during the Barisan Youth Manifesto launching by Umno Youth chief, Khairy Jamaluddin at Merdeka Hall, PWTC, Kuala Lumpur, April 10, 2018. — Picture by Hari Anggara

Barisan Nasional youth supporters wave placards during the Barisan Youth Manifesto launching by Umno Youth chief, Khairy Jamaluddin at Merdeka Hall, PWTC, Kuala Lumpur, April 10, 2018. — Picture by Hari Anggara

 

KUALA LUMPUR, April 10 — Barisan Nasional’s (BN) manifesto for the youths launched tonight has eight pledges, chief among them to strengthen rural economies, guarantee more job opportunities, and increase income and training for young workers.

The creation of ‘agropreneur’ and ‘seapreneur’

To assist youths in rural areas, BN Youth chief Khairy Jamaluddin has promised to allocate RM180 million to fund young farmers, expected to benefit up to 10,000 “agropreneurs”.

Another RM20 million will be allocated to fund “seapreneurs”, affecting up to 1,000 young fishermen.

To create this new breed of rural youth entrepreneurs, he has promised to expand the rural digital economy through various programmes such as eUsahawan, eRezeki and eLadang while making it cheaper for youths to obtain a B2 motorcycle license under the MyLesen programme.

At the manifesto launch tonight, Khairy echoed BN chairman Datuk Seri Najib Razak’s promise to Felda settlers with a RM5,000 incentive for all, special replanting grant and to write off all replanting debts as well as debts incurred in purchasing Felda Global Venture shares.

In the manifesto, he said: “By assisting the youths in rural areas in every district, we will generate more job opportunities and guarantee that rural youths will succeed in the digital world. We will assist farmers and fishermen with funds and training programmes.”

One million jobs for youths

BN has also promised that youths will be able to take part in national infrastructure mega projects. He expected this to be able to generate more job opportunities as well.

More than one million youths will also benefit and be able to obtain career opportunities under Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET), as he plans on expanding the National TVET Boot Camp short courses and premises nationwide.

Another five million schoolchildren will be prepared with the relevant skill sets to face the Digital Industrial Revolution 4.0 while more than one million tertiary education students will be receiving PTPTN loans.

Khairy has also promised to create more high skill job opportunities by developing high tech industries and through MyInternship programme where university students have the opportunity to receive industrial training.

Boosting youth income

Young teachers can rejoice under BN’s leadership with the introduction of a special incentive if they hold tuition classes after school hours while reducing administrative duties.

Under the Fair Works Commission, Khairy promised to improve the market’s salary scale while increasing minimum wage.

He has also promised to reduce the nation’s reliance on foreign workers by 15 per cent. The ratio of employee compensation will also be increased up to 40 per cent of the national gross domestic product.

“We will begin to intervene on salary increment to improve the market’s salary scheme. We will also assist the youths to pick up new online skills or their productivity by assistance to purchase work related software.

“Companies are encouraged to offer flexible working hours and the youths have the opportunity to earn more income through the Orang-E portal,” he said in the manifesto.

Creating more youth entrepreneurs

BN will also allocated RM5 billion assistance into the Youth Entrepreneurial Network — a one-stop centre for all government agencies tasked with assisting young entrepreneurs. The network will reduce bureaucratic red tape while expediting approvals for assistance.

Tax exemption and a special fund will be granted to encourage renowned brands or companies to assist small time entrepreneurs while a digital transformation for the small and medium enterprises via grants and credit loan guarantee is expected to assist them gain access into the international market.

A special allocation for Sabah and Sarawak entrepreneurs will be made available under the National Development Fund where they will provide carve-out and compete initiatives.

Easing the burden of young families

Newly-wedded couples or those planning to get married will receive a financial assistance to ease wedding expenses.

A special parental course in 168 locations nationwide will also be made available for expecting parents while the existing ADAM50 initiative will increase the financial assistance for families with newborns.

Parents who save up for their children’s education will also enjoy a special incentive while children below 12 from low income families living in low cost housing schemes will have access to art and sports classes.

Micro-credit loan conditions specifically for part-time women entrepreneurs will be made available to encourage more women generate income.

Increasing quality of life

Like the main manifesto, affordable housing has received special attention from BN Youth. It has promised to increase the number of affordable homes, make rent more affordable, transit homes, rent-to-own homes and assisting them in getting deposits.

A special bank will be created to stimulate affordable home ownership. The bank will make loan processes for homes below RM300,000 easier.

Khairy also promised to reduce broadband subscription by 50 per cent while doubling its speed in phases. Public universities will be among the first to enjoy high speed internet access of 100 gigabit per second.

Under BN’s rule, each state constituency will enjoy a public internet centre with a minimum speed of 20 megabit per second.

No one left behind

To ensure that everyone will enjoy Malaysia’s economic success, Khairy has given his guarantee to a broad segment of Malaysian society that has been left behind and forgotten.

Islamic religious school graduates will be paired up with Halal Industry Companies while the Orang Asli youths will have job opportunities with green companies. Training will also be provided for disabled youths so they may enter the mainstream job market.

Former drug abusers, former juvenile convicts, the homeless and single teen mothers will also be granted a second chance through training programmes so they too may enter the mainstream job market.

Youth participation in national administration

Youths will also be able to decide on national and local agenda. Khairy promised to establish a Youth Local Council chaired by the local council presidents or mayor so they may debate issues pertaining to youths.

He also promised a 35 per cent youth participation on Rukun Tetangga leadership committees while under the Belia@Kabinet programme, the best ideas from youths voted under the MyCadang application will be submitted to the Cabinet on a monthly basis.

Source: https://www.malaymail.com