Tag Archives: Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET)

TVET graduates employability on the rise

Continuous efforts in strengthening technical and vocational education and training (TVET) has yielded success, according to the Malaysia Education Blueprint 2013-2025 Annual Report 2018. — NSTP/ASWADI ALIAS.By Sarah RahimHana Naz Harun – July 29, 2019 @ 7:34pm

KUALA LUMPUR: Continuous efforts in strengthening technical and vocational education and training (TVET) has yielded success, according to the Malaysia Education Blueprint 2013-2025 Annual Report 2018.

Education Minister Dr Maszlee Malik said the significant achievements include an increase in TVET graduates’ employability from 12,803 in 2017 to 13,740 last year (2018).

Since helming the ministry, various initiatives were introduced to make TVET a career pathway of choice among students.

The initiatives include having a TVET Empowerment Committee to develop a new policy relevant to industrial needs, apprenticeship, professional certification, entrepreneurship and community college certification pathways.

The ministry also collaborates with industry players, Malaysia Digital Economy Corporation Sdn Bhd, as well as Pondok Perdana to empower and value-add the skills of ‘pondok’ students through structured and organised programmes.

Maszlee was presenting the annual report at Sasana Kijang. Also present was Deputy Education Minister Teo Nie Ching.

He also said the pioneer Zero Dropouts programme had reduced the percentage of dropouts by 26.1 per cent for secondary students and 25.6 per cent for primary students.

“Perlis succeeded in getting 100 per cent dropouts to enrol back in schools from August to November last year,” he said.

Among other highlights include a jump in national pre-school enrolment from 84.3 per cent in 2017 to 85.4 per cent last year.

Maszlee also said the number of schools which had excelled in incorporating the Higher Order Thinking Skills rose from 13 in 2017 to 189 last year.

Despite the achievements, Maszlee said there were still overall improvements that were needed.

He said the ministry still faced various challenges on culture, monitoring and resolution, and the ability to effectively engage stakeholders.

“In my opinion, these challenges are the main cause as to why some of the initiatives have been interrupted or stopped.”

Maszlee also said the ministry was looking into the blueprint to ensure of its relevance.

“We have the same vision and mission, but we need to drastically improve our execution,” he said, adding that the National Education Policy Review Committee had found after a six-month evaluation that although the blueprint was still relevant, there were several bold changes that needed to be carried out.

“It is not the time yet to reveal the details of the suggestions by the committee but the basic concept would include realigning the grading approach based on age or single education pathway,” he said, adding that a complete report was expected to be ready by year end.

Source: www.nst.com.my

Certification-level training for Drone Piloting on the way

School leavers with the ambition of becoming professional drone pilots can soon take a course on Drone Piloting under a vocational programme at colleges and polytechnics around the country.

The Department of Skills Development under the Ministry of Human Resources recently launched the Malaysia National Occupational Skills Standards (NOSS) for the piloting of Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) or Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV), popularly referred to as ‘Drones’’.

With the launch of this standard,  vocational and private educational institutions can now offer Drone Piloting courses under the Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) programme and be awarded the SKM (Sijil Kemahiran Malaysia) or a Malaysia Skills Certificate

At the moment, several private organisations have been offering courses in various aspects of drone operation; for mapping, facilities inspection, progress report (for property developers and construction projects), film and drama production, news, the acquisition of aerial footage and photographs.

These courses last from two days (for basic operation of a drone) to a few days covering the various aspects of drone piloting for specific purposes such as mapping.

Before the launch of the NOSS Standard, formal government-recognised certification for drone piloting courses were not available for the aspiring pilot.

As the usage of drones expands, beyond a hobby to industrial use, the need for trained pilots who have gone through structured instructions based on an accepted and recognised national standards, become increasingly pressing.  

Especially now that the word ‘drone’ appears in the media daily from all over the world; both negative and positive news.

But it is always the negative aspects that capture the public’s imagination and it is up to the industry to dispel negativity and myths that surround drones.

One positive effort is the adoption of formalised training for drone operators; people who not only know how to operate them safely within the limitations of each type of craft but who are also aware of the legal and regulatory requirements in the operation of drones.

Sometime in 2017, Malaysia Unmanned Drones Activist Society (MUDAS), a non-governmental organisation devoted to the development and advancement of drones in the country, initiated discussions with the Department of Skills Development or Jabatan Pembangunan Kemahiran (JPK) to develop a formal curriculum for the training of drone pilots under the vocational programmes of the many polytechnics and colleges spread throughout the country.

MUDAS is a non-governmental organisation devoted to the development and advancement of drones in the country.

L – R: Khairul Arriffin Aziz, CEO AECA Solutions William Alvisse, MUDAS Executive Secretary Mohd Noor Rahim, MUDAS Deputy Chairman, Hj Zaid bin Mat San, Deputy Director Curriculum Unit, NOSS 
(Photo by Haidar Abu Bakar)

The NGO has been in the forefront of promoting dialogue with government agencies that are involved in regulating and controlling the nation’s airspace, the Civil Aviation Authority of Malaysia (CAAM), the Jabatan Ukur dan Pemetaan Negara (JUPEM), the survey and mapping department, which has traditionally been the authority overseeing aerial photography, especially mapping because of its implications on national security, and other organisations that have direct and indirect interests in the operation of ‘drones’.

“MUDAS initiated contact with JPK in late 2017 to moot the idea of drone pilot training under the National Occupational Skills Standard (NOSS) programme,” said Executive Secretary William Alvisse.

“In mid-2018 an expert panel was formed comprising of representatives from  CAAM, Jupem and MCMC (Malaysian Communications and Multimedia Commission) to create the current Curriculum,” Alvisse added.

Husni Faiz, a graduate of Electrical Power Engineering and a full-time pilot under BIP Studio and drone piloting trainer welcomes the NOSS Standards.

Husni Faiz, professional drone pilot and trainer

“It’s vital for those intending to be professional drone pilots undergo formal training such as the structure that is recommended in the NOSS standard.

“While recreational flyers may not need the entire course structure, it would be a good idea if parts or modules of that could be offered to training companies to train the hobbyists and recreational flyers,”  he added.

Husni also trains pilots under his Akufly Academy.

“Having the NOSS training standard is good for the industry, said Kamarul A Muhamed, CEO of the Aerodyne Group.

Kamarul A Muhamed CEO Aerodyne Group

Aerodyne operates in 11 countries and is regarded as the premier drone services company, providing integrated managed solutions for the petroleum, civil engineering and facilities industry.

It employs 300 people, 1/3rd of whom are drone pilots.

“A structured drone piloting course will increase the level of competence and will lead to better safety and quality of operations,” he added.

Currently, Aerodyne trains its local pilots locally and in-house following the structure set by training schools in the UK and Australia where some of their pilots and trainers have been trained. The company then structure their training based on the training syllabus of these schools.

The Aerodyne pilots operating in their international markets are trained at authorised training schools for certifications should this be available in that particular country.

As a renowned global drone services company, recruitment isn’t an issue with many would-be pilots clamouring to join the group.

“The challenge, however, is in getting good technical pilots with the right mentality for enterprise-level work,” Kamarul said.

Kamarul lists technical ability, having a global mindset, the ability to communicate well and good and diligent in report writing, and problem-solving skills as the key factors he looks for in a candidate.

Drone Academy Asia provides training for drone operators and its graduates receive a “globally recognised DJI certificate”.

A representative of the academy said that they believe a formalised course structure is needed for the industry and that they are studying the NOSS standard and framework.

Located at the Cyberjaya Innovation Hub, Drone Academy offers courses in Aerial Mapping and Surveying, Precise Aerial Mapping and a Human Resource Development Fund (HRDF) claimable Professional Drone Operator course. 

The idea for a structured course, leading to certification is to produce well trained and competent workforce to meet the requirements of drone service companies to handle flights for mapping, facilities and structure monitoring, agriculture to name just three areas where drones are being increasingly used.

“There are two levels, Level 2 and 3 with 1,200 hours and 1,300 hours of training respectively,” said Alvisse.

“Upon completion of the training, candidates will be awarded an SKM (Sijil Kemahiran Malaysia) certificate,” Alvisse added. 

“Just a word of caution though,” Kamarul said.

“In the long term drone piloting will be limited in requirements as the industry moves into pilotless autonomous operation.”

Which will then necessitate an overhaul of the training syllabus?

Source: Citizen Journalist Malaysia

NST Leader: TVET – Big room for improvement

(File pix) Only 13 per cent of all upper secondary students are pursuing TVET courses, while merely nine per cent are doing them at polytechnics. Pix by NSTP/Aizuddin SaadBy New Straits Times – June 11, 2019 @ 12:01am

THE world of technical and vocational education and training (TVET) is one of paradoxes and other mind bogglers.

Five thousand TVET and science places are waiting to be filled, yet there are no takers. Puzzlingly, too, TVET grad employability is a very high 95 per cent versus tertiary institution grad employability of an average of 80 per cent.

This the parents and students do not know, says Education Minister Dr Maszlee Malik. Little wonder, only 13 per cent of all upper secondary students are pursuing TVET courses, while merely nine per cent are doing them at polytechnics.

A 2018 report by Khazanah Research Institute (KRI) on The School-To-Work Transition of Young Malaysians lends support to the minister’s claim.

The report quotes job seekers as saying TVET to be the most useful qualification for getting a good job. Yet — here comes another mind boggler — TVET is not a popular education pathway. As Maszlee says, there may need to be a deeper analysis. We agree.

Perhaps, the problem may not be in TVET itself, but in everything associated with it. This maze must be untangled. Consider this.

There are more than 1,000 public and private TVET institutions — 565 public institutions under six ministries and 600 private institutions.

This causes a plethora of problems, says the KRI report. One such is a lack of strategic coordination. This should have been to some extent solved by the Malaysia Board of Technologies — a governance and certification body — launched on Nov 17, 2016. But fragmentation continues. The puzzle thickens.

“Low wages” appear to be standing in the way of TVET, too. To Maszlee, this is a perception problem. It may very well be. And can be solved with some generous dose of awareness.

Remuneration is based on TVET skills acquired and as the skills are upgraded along with the experience gained, salary tends to move up.

But there is hope yet. Maszlee says a cabinet-level committee is hard at work consolidating resources as well as synchronising efforts to ensure stronger branding, more effective governance, funding and accreditation structures to make TVET a primary choice for students.

We will hold our horses until the more “sexy” TVET arrives. Part of this reform involves making the TVET industry responsive, according to deputy director-general at the Education Ministry’s Polytechnic and Community College Education Department, Dr Mohammad Naim Yaakub.

The idea is, he says, to make supply match demand by way of artificial intelligence and big data. This has been the experience of many European countries. European countries have skewed their skills development policy towards encouraging such a match.

KRI sees competency-based training as critical to TVET reform. This allows for the design of practical, demand-driven courses for industry needs.

Competency-based TVET uses short modular courses geared to market industry demand, enabling students to enter the market with a defined set of skills.

Modular courses also come with additional advantages: they promote lifelong learning and are less time-intensive. The rest of the world is heading towards short “nano degrees”. We should too.

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Riot dismisses claims that TVET problematic, not systematic

TVET, a relevant choice

Source: www.nst.com.my/opinion/leaders/2019

Comment: Again, would like to point out that one factor that maybe left out is the fact that current Sijil Kemahiran Malaysia (SKM) & Diploma Kemahiran Malaysia (DKM) holders are facing stumbling block in furthering their study to higher education due to SPM qualification issues, ie passing BM & History and/or with 3 credits as per required by MQA.

Chinese independent secondary school students can train at 32 institutes and get certificates, says HR minister

Human Resource Minister M. Kulasegaran speaks to reporters at a press conference in Subang Jaya January 18, 2019. ― Picture by Hari Anggara
Human Resource Minister M. Kulasegaran speaks to reporters at a press conference in Subang Jaya January 18, 2019. ― Picture by Hari Anggara

KUALA LUMPUR, May 23 — Technical and vocational stream students in Chinese independent secondary schools (CIS) may join training programmes at the 32 training institutes under the Manpower Department and receive the Malaysia Skills Certificates.

Human Resource Minister M. Kula Segaran said the ministry would also offer the vocational training officer (VTO) course to technical and vocational education and training (TVET) trainers from schools that meet the terms and conditions set by the Skills Development Department.

“The ministry may allow students from schools under Dong Zong to attend training programmes at 23 industrial training institutes (ITI), eight advanced technology training centres (ADTEC) and a Japanese-Malaysian technical institute through an aptitude test.

“The ministry can also award the Level 3 Malaysia skills certificate and Level 4 Malaysia skills diploma to TVET trainers via recognition of prior achievements,” he told reporters after the signing of a memorandum of understanding (MoU) between the ministry and Dong Zong in Kajang near here.

He said the ministry would also consider applications for loans or scholarships to eligible students to further their studies in TVET, VTO and other programmes.

Kula Segaran said the move to provide opportunities for CIS was important to fill the lack of non-Malay participation in TVET institutions, as well as to meet labour market needs.

Meanwhile, Dong Zong chairman Tan Tai Kim said TVET education began in 1987 at CIS and presently, 19 such schools were offering the programme involving 2,046 students.

“But the students faced a setback as the vocational certificates were not recognised, so with the signing of the MoU, the students are hopeful of pursuing their ambition,” he said.

Besides allowing the students to continue their studies at the manpower department’s training institutes, the MoU would also help Dong Zong gear the CIS towards recognition as registered training centres under the skills development department.

Kula Segaran said a proposal for all ITIs to stay open until 11 pm for the public to attend classes and continue their studies in TVET after office hours and on weekends and public holidays, was being studied. — Bernama

FMM urges govt to expedite set up of TVET Commission

Vocational trainees at Gamuda IBS Banting learn and practise skills relevant to an increasingly modernising construction sector that is adopting Industry 4.0 way of doing business. NSTP photo by SADDAM YUSOFFBy Ooi Tee Ching – May 4, 2019 @ 12:28pm

KUALA LUMPUR: Federation of Malaysian Manufacturers (FMM) president Datuk Soh Thian Lai urges the government to expedite the set up of the special commission to address fragmentation of TVET implementation, which currently cuts across seven ministries.

In a recent statement, Soh said many in the industry including FMM has been asking the government, for many years, to set up a single enforcement body to coordinate the implement Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) in the country.

The TVET Empowerment Committee’s recommendation to set up a TVET Commission is a long awaited decision and has received positive feedback from stakeholders in the series of Town Hall sessions held nationwide.

With this TVET Commission, Soh said the National Blueprint for TVET can be implemented effectively to support industrial transformation of Malaysia’s economy towards a developed nation.

If the proposed TVET Commission has joint oversight by the Ministry of Education and Ministry of Human Resources, Soh said it would facilitate seamless transition of support programmes and policies from schools to working adults.

There is an urgent need to standardise training and qualifications, quality assurance, qualification portability, recognition of prior learning, and greater cost effectiveness in the use of resources.

“The funding of TVET institutions must be based on performance and aligned to market demand to mandate collaboration with the industry,” added the FMM president, who is also TVET Empowerment Committee chairman.

More than 60 per cent of jobs that will be created during the 11th Malaysia Plan (2016 to 2020) and the incoming 12th Malaysia Plan (2021 to 2025) is projected to require more TVET-related skills.

Therefore, it is necessary to upskill and reskill the current workforce, and reinforce lifelong learning to continually acquire new and emerging skills required by new technologies such as the Fourth Industrial Revolution.

Soh stressed TVET success requires strengthening of public-private partnership between the skills training institutes and industry, at every step of the value chain, to ensure employability of the TVET graduates.

Back in December 2018, Permatang Pauh MP Nurul Izzah Anwar announced she will table a private member’s bill to establish a commission that will streamline and oversee all TVET institutes nationwide.

Source: www.nst.com.my

TVET to be re-branded to make it more appealing

Education Minister Dr Maszlee Malik at Putrajaya today. Pix by NSTP/Luqman Hakim ZubirBy Hashini Kavishtri Kannan – April 26, 2019 @ 2:54pm

PUTRAJAYA: The Education Ministry is looking into re-branding technical and vocational education and training (TVET) programme.

This also includes the possibility of changing its name to be more appealing, said Dr Maszlee Malik.

The Education ministry said it would undertake efforts to make TVET as a mainstream choice for students, instead of it being viewed as a second option.

“Currently, the stigma among the people is that TVET is a second choice and that they will not succeed if they take up TVET programmes.

“Therefore, the ministry will spearhead initiatives to change the stigma and perception including the possibility of changing of the name of TVET,” he said today.

Maszlee said TVET and vocational training is not something that people looked at highly.

“We have to acknowledge and appreciate that human skills are different from one another, and that there are people who could excel in the field of TVET.

“We, at the ministry are committed to bring up TVET as a top of choice of study,” he told reporters at an event organised by Education Ministry to announce three new initiatives that will be undertaken by community colleges to improve and enhance quality of education in line with the Fourth Industrial Revolution 4.0 (IR 4.0).

The three new initiatives are the ACES, Maker Market and Pondok Perdana.

Maszlee said ACES, an acronym for Apprenticeship, Professional Certification, Entrepreneurship and ‘Sijil Kolej Community’ are four pathways for secondary school leavers to take up TVET programmes at community colleges.

The Maker Market is an initiative taken by these colleges to collaborate with industry players, including Malaysia Digital Economy Corporation Sdn Bhd (MDEC), to create industry ready workers.

“Pondok Perdana, the third initiative, is to empower and value-add the skills of ‘pondok’ students through more structured and organised programmes.

“Through this, community colleges would cater certificate and diploma programmes to these students,” he added.

Also present were Education director-general Datuk Dr Amin Senin and Polytechnic and Community College Education Department director-general Prof Datuk Dr Mohd Ismail Abd Aziz.

Source: https://www.nst.com.my/

Comment: TVET is already an internationally recognised name, what rebranding are you talking about Dr Maszlee?? You think rebranding is just a change of name?
Has the Ministry discussed with the various stakeholders?
Heard from a source saying the name might be changed to
Certificate In Practical Engineering Technology or CIPET!


Night TVET classes for working community

Human Resources minister M. Kulasegaran and Japanese Ambassador to Malaysia Dr Makio Miyagawa at a ceremony to celebrate Japanese Foreign Ministry commendation to Japan-Malaysia Technical Institute (JMTI) for promotion of economic relations between Japan and Malaysia at JMTI in Lorong Bukit Minyak. NSTP/RAMDZAN MASIAM.By Balvin Kaur – April 7, 2019 @ 4:37pm

BUKIT MERTAJAM: The Human Resources Ministry is encouraging technical and vocational education and training (TVET) institutions to provide night classes for the working class community.

Its Minister M. Kulasegaran said the current operation hours were 8am to 5pm but the ministry encouraged the institutions to extend the operational hours for another six hours by remaining open until 11pm.

“Eight to five are the normal working hours but we are now encouraging all TVET institutions to also operate from 5pm to 11pm to give opportunity for those working in nearby companies to continue their training to improve their skills.

“This is being done in other countries including Japan and even here at the Penang Skill Development Centre,” he told reporters after attending a ceremony to celebrate Japanese Foreign Ministry commendation to Japan-Malaysia Technical Institute (JMTI) for promotion of economic relations between Japan and Malaysia at JMTI in Lorong Bukit Minyak here today.

Also present were Finance Minister Lim Guan Eng and Japanese Ambassador to Malaysia Dr Makio Miyagawa.

Kulasegaran said the ministry had also suggested to Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) to continue working with JMTI as a regional training centre that runs JICA training programmes for participants in this region.

“I believe that this is significant as it lends credence to the name “Japan-Malaysia Technical Institute”,” he said.

He said he hoped JICA would continue to dispatch technical experts and senior volunteers to share knowledge with instructors from local institutions.

Meanwhile, Lim said in the Eleventh Malaysia Plan (11MP), it was targeted that the percentage of skilled workers would increase from 28 per cent to 35 per cent by 2020 but in order to achieve this, TVET sector needed to become a game changer so that it could easily meet the demand and requirement of the industry.

“The target is to increase TVET students annual intake gradually from 164,000 in 2013 to 225,000 in 2020,” he said.

Lim said government continued to place strong emphasis for improvement of TVET and had provided significant allocation for this year, totalling nearly RM170 million.

However, Lim said the government could no longer afford to provide large allocations to public institutions with regards to capital expenses such as buying new machines and equipment.

He said an effective public-private partnership was needed in which industry could share their resources such as machineries and technical expertise in order to help train more local students.

“Now more than ever, it is crucial that the private sector comes forward and helps the government by sponsoring, or donating equipment or machinery to TVET institutions.

“Alternatively companies may also provide opportunities for TVET students to be trained using machines and equipment available at their facilities,” he said.

Lim said in other countries such India and Germany, there was specific legislation that compelled companies to participate in TVET.

However, the Bagan member of parliament did not elaborate on whether the government had plans to implement such legislation.

Lim said the government hoped that the industry and TVET institutions would voluntarily collaborate across their entire value chain of TVET, if possible from student recruitment to curriculum design, delivery and even job placement.

“Companies should also consider offering scholarships especially for students to encourage more students to join TVET programmes. For this year, such contributions are eligible for tax deduction,” he said.

Source: www.nst.com.my

Comment: Another option is to learn TVET courses via online (blended with workshops) that makes it easier for working adults to learn anytime, anywhere.

Tawau Vocational College hopes to gain from Taiwan link-up

TAWAU: Director of the Tawau Vocational College, Ahmad Fakhrurasi Hamzah, is confident its international cooperation with seven Taiwan institutes of higher learning will strengthen Sabah’s Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET). He said they signed a memorandum of understanding with these universities and colleges during a recent benchmarking visit to the country and is now in the midst of streamlining the agreement, including taking into consideration the standard operating procedures of the law. He said it was understood that equipment such as machines for learning at Taiwan’s higher learning institutions are replaced every three years and, hopefully, this will be donated to the Tawau Vocational College. “They have already shared their intention of donating their equipment and we hope this can be done,” he said.  

Commenting further, Ahmad Fakhrurazi said the inking of the MoU is to provide lecturers from the Tawau Vocational College with the opportunities of advancement at higher learning institutes in developed countries to enhance their competitiveness. In addition, he hoped that the development would be a starting point towards producing competent and skilled students.  

Meanwhile, Vice Chairman of Taiwan’s Sabah Branch Alumni Association, Pang Thou Chong said Tawau Vocational College has a huge potential and that TVET is very important for the job market and also provide good prospect for the State. He hoped the initiatives and cooperation would enhance the students’ skills particularly in agriculture, mechanics, construction, culinary and electronics in view of the job market for graduates with TVET skills.

Source: http://www.dailyexpress.com.my

Comment: Such tie up definitely benefit our students as well as cost savings from the purchase of these machines, some of which maybe very costly.
But am just wondering, why would the Taiwanese higher learning institutions donate to Malaysian counterpart rather than to their local TVET institutions? Are they so rich or even their local TVET institutions consider those machines would be too outdated by then?

TVET courses to be recognised by single body, says Maszlee

SHAH ALAM: Education Minister Maszlee Malik says the Cabinet has approved a proposal for a single qualifying body for Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) courses.

“This is so that every TVET institution will produce graduates who are recognised, instead of them being lumped together in the labour market without recognition from the industry,” he said in his speech at the Rise of the Asian Tiger Convention at UiTM Shah Alam today.

He added that the process of integration has begun for vocational colleges, polytechnics, community colleges, and technical universities in the country.

Previously, he said, these institutions were separate and played different functions.

“Today they are all under one roof, under the education ministry. But what we want is for them to be standardised, so there is alignment and communication between these institutions.

“We want to increase material sharing, sharing of expertise, and sharing of industry connections.”

He referred to programmes at vocational colleges which are often criticised for being unrecognised or unaccepted. These, he said, would now abide by the standards of the Malaysian Qualifications Agency and the Department of Skills Development under the human resources ministry.

This would also enable industry players to connect with the ministry with more ease, which would in turn provide a wider employment market for graduates, he said.

He said the ministry would ensure that TVET courses are seen as a primary choice instead of an alternative.

On a recent Bank Negara report highlighting low entry-level salaries, he said the issue is being addressed, with changes underway.

Besides widening industry participation in education, he said, the ministry will review the courses and tertiary education streams that are presently available.

This includes looking into the potential cancellation of certain courses, or the addition of new ones which are more needs-driven or based on current market needs.

“What is for certain is that the ministry is committed to ensuring that universities and graduates are capable of preparing the best products in the industry network, to face the obstacles of the fourth industrial revolution,” he said.

Maszlee also spoke of an increased collaboration among public universities.

“They will collaborate between one public university and another based on their various fields, whereby we have categorised the public universities into clusters,” he said.

“We no longer want them moving in a silo, or conducting their roles without collaboration or synergy. (This way) we can ensure that the best is given to students and the academics working at the universities.”

He said the ministry has set up different clusters to help public universities reinforce their strengths, identities and marketability of their graduates.

“We also want to stress the concept of internationalising our universities.

“We are confident that we can become leaders in our fields, and in each speciality of these universities,” he said.

The categories in question are: Malaysian Focus University, Malaysian Research University, Malaysian Comprehensive University, Malaysian Technical University and Malaysian Islamic University.

On the matter of the zero-reject policy in schools, Maszlee said schools had received 83,039 disabled students since the policy was implemented earlier this year.

For undocumented children, 2,635 students have registered with schools so far.

Source: www.freemalaysiatoday.com

Comment:
Wonder what took the Ministry so long.
So now “Integration has begun for vocational colleges, polytechnics, community colleges, and technical universities” – no details given on the integration.
And what about the ILP, IKBN, IKTBN and other Pusat Bertauliah JPK, especially the private ones?

TVET good option for furthering studies and getting jobs, says Kula

Human Resources Minister M Kula Segaran.

SEREMBAN: Technical and vocational education and training (TVET), which emphasises skills, is a good option for furthering studies, said Human Resources Minister M Kula Segaran.

He said this was in line with the country’s aim to produce more skilled workers as currently the percentage of skilled workers stood at only 28% when the target by 2020 is 35%.

“Skills training is very important and the country’s progress depends on it.

“I hope our young will pick TVET as the first choice. Parents should not solely be looking at sending their children to universities because TVET is no less important,” he told reporters after attending a “Human resource ministry with the people” event in Rantau here today.

He also said involvement of the Chinese and Indian communities in TVET was rather lukewarm, standing at 1% and 5% respectively, and that the ministry was intensifying efforts to encourage higher participation from them as well as the Orang Asli community.

He added it was easy for TVET students to get jobs after completing their courses, citing the take-up rate now stood at 94%.

On other matters, Kula said the ministry held “Meet-the-Customer” sessions at its headquarters in Putrajaya every Tuesday from 8am to 10am, whereby not only top ministry officials would be present but he himself.

In conjunction with the progamme, the minister also made a walkabout at the new market in Rantau town.

Source: www.freemalaysiatoday.com/

Comment: If you are interested to pursue TVET education but do not know where to find these institutions, fill up your details here