Tag Archives: technical and vocational education training (TVET)

Make TVET first choice #TVETjob




Kulasegaran (centre) witnessing the exchange of documents between Lim (in dark jacket) and Muhd Khair at the Ann Joo company plant in Prai, Penang.

Kulasegaran (centre) witnessing the exchange of documents between Lim (in dark jacket) and Muhd Khair at the Ann Joo company plant in Prai, Penang.

THE technical and vocational education training (TVET) should be the first choice among the students to further their studies as the days of the academic studies are over, said Human Resources Minister M. Kulasegaran.

“Let us take the worst scenario. Ten years ago, parents sent their children to study medicine and now, quite a number are found to be jobless for nearly two years.

“Whereas, students who graduated with TVET are met with jobs waiting for them at the door step.

“These students will be easily absorbed anyway, as the job opportunities and wages are better after completing their studies,” he said.

Kulasegaran said parents were starting to realise that studies in skills fields had more potential unlike academic studies, as the demand for skilled jobs were high and jobs were available instantly upon competition of the courses.

“You would be surprised that many of the TVET students are working in the Middle-East and Singapore, earning lucrative salaries of between RM30,000 and RM50,000 per month based on their skills.

“We are also in the process of discussion with Japan to have tie-ups between their TVET universities and Malaysian colleges.”

Kulasegaran was speaking to reporters after witnessing the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between the Manpower Department (JTM) and Yayasan Jasa Ann Joo.

JTM was represented by its director-general Datuk Muhd Khair Razman Mohamed Annuar while Yayasan Jasa Ann Joo was represented by Ann Joo Group executive director Datuk Lawrence Lim Aun Chuan.

The signing ceremony was held at the Ann Joo Steel Berhad, Prai last Thursday.

Kulasegaran said among the key areas of cooperation in the MoU were apprenticeship opportunities and scholarships for TVET students at 32 TVET institutions under JTM, including temporary placements or industry attachment.

He said forging partnerships between public TVET institutions and the industries were pivotal for the development of TVET in the country to enable graduates to meet the needs and demand of the industry and to have first-hand working experiences.

Lim said through Yayasan Jasa Ann Joo, scholarships would be offered to qualified students of the Manpower Department Training Institution (ILJTM), and job opportunities would be offered to them upon completing their studies.

“We have not finalised how many students will be offered the scholarships, as we are in the midst of identifying them,” he added.

Meanwhile, Kulasegaran urged more local companies to emulate the efforts by Ann Joo Steel Berhad and Yayasan Jasa Ann Joo in establishing partnerships with TVET training providers, especially among the local small-and-medium enterprises.

He also praised Ann Joo for employing 85% local workers and had given priority to hire local talents.

Source: www.thestar.com.my

Comment: Besides the steel industry, there are currently 2 big chains that are looking for TVET graduates in the respective fields:

1. Retail
2. Service industry – restaurants (Stewarding Operations, F&B etc)

If you think you qualify, kindly email your resume to tvetjob@gmail.com

Adding value to vocational education

EDUCATION reform in Malaysia has been long overdue and it is undeniable that to be a developed nation, major changes have to be made. Ensuring access to education for all gives us a powerful weapon to reduce and even eliminate poverty.

We must provide marginalised individuals especially those who do not pursue a university degree, access to an alternative means of education that would allow them to work in a theoretically considered and practically competent way.

To achieve this, the government aims to overhaul Technical and Vocational Education Training (TVET).

TVET is a dual vocational training system that promotes competency-based education and training linked to industry needs. TVET students undergo classroom learning and informal learning at workplaces. Graduates are accepted into companies as they are better equipped to cope with the challenges.

As we prepare to face the challenges of Industrial Revolution 4.0, it is especially important for those in the B40 group to uplift themselves through vocational learning. Many are struggling to find jobs within key industries because they lack the required skills and technical expertise.

The government spends RM4.5 billion on TVET courses annually, and programmes are run across seven different ministries.

However, there are some massive challenges that must first be addressed. There is little coordination between these ministries on how the programmes are run and in some cases their functions overlap. For example, the Education Ministry is responsible for community colleges and polytechnics, while the Youth and Sports and the Rural and Rural Development ministries also oversee public training institutions.

TVET has been seen as an unpopular alternative for many students and it has failed to attract the numbers. A report published by the Khazanah Research Institute last month on the “School-to-Work Transition of Young Malaysians” states that only 13% of all upper secondary students are pursuing TVET courses while at the higher education level, less than 9% are in polytechnics. This is in contrast to Germany, Switzerland and even Singapore where more than half of their students end up in TVET instead of universities.

The report also highlighted the negative perception towards TVET with both students and parents regarding it as an “inferior educational pathway, deadend and for the academically challenged”.

The often-cited model for reform is the German dual vocational training system where companies and government vocational schools work in cooperation to produce skilled workers. Vocational training is coordinated and regulated by policies and the qualifications produced are recognised by the state, the economy and society. The German model has resulted in low unemployment rate and it upgrades its continuous training of skilled workers to meet the demands of their economy as it changes over time.

The close social partnership between TVET institutes, the government, private individual industries, employer associations and the relevant chambers of commerce and unions plays a vital role to develop the standards for vocational training in Germany.

Adapting the German model to Malaysia however is easier said than done. One of the biggest differences is the longstanding tradition of vocational training in Germany that has received wide public support. Companies are willing to take part in training students and TVET is generally seen as a recognised qualification.

If we aim to emulate the success of the German model, we must work towards changing the perception of the public towards TVET, and make the system more appealing

TVET graduates in Malaysia are not being recognised as professionals and there is a significant wage problem that needs to be solved to ensure that graduates are not marginalised and continuously left behind. The average maximum salary reported by public sector employers for workers with TVET qualifications is around RM3,000 lower compared to university graduates and only about RM500 more than for school leavers.

There is genuine concern about the ability of the system to address the employability of young Malaysians and their marketability and adaptability to meet the demands of a rapidly changing labour market, especially with the onset of Industrial Revolution 4.0. The point about outdated TVET syllabus was recently highlighted by the National Union of the Teaching Profession and the National Parent-Teacher Associations’ Vocational and Technical Consultative Council.

To tackle this issue, reforms must concentrate on institutionalising vocational training to include setting strategic plans and mechanisms that would allow for continuous research and changes to make the system constantly relevant to meet the demands of industry. The government must work with key industry players to institutionalise their role within the framework of an evolving TVET system.

Among the suggested reforms by former TVET special taskforce head Nurul Izzah Anwar includes establishing an Industry Skills Education and Training Commission to facilitate data sharing between all TVET institutes, coordinate TVET programmes with industry needs, and oversee job security and more meaningful wages for TVET graduates.

She had suggested a ratings system for different TVET institutes, which would allow parents and students to assess which schools are best for them.

Hopefully these measures will push us closer towards achieving a sustainable vocational training system that will rival university-level education.

Source: www.thesundaily.com

Syllabus is outdated, say teachers

KUALA LUMPUR: Teachers have voiced their concern that technical and vocational graduates will end up unemployed unless the syllabus is made more relevant.

Feedback from Technical and Vocational Education Training (TVET) teachers was that the syllabus is outdated, said National Union of the Teaching Profession (NUTP) secretary-general Harry Tan.

He cited the case of a company, which is on the Forbes Global 2000 List, that had approached NUTP to help identify students they could train, and later hire.

As it turned out, the company could not hire existing TVET graduates because they would not have been able to operate the latest machines.

“This is a major player in the construction industry and their feedback is that our TVET syllabus is obsolete.

“They want students with the know-how and they’re willing to train them,” he said in an interview.

Tan also called for a “solid” TVET policy to be in place fast.

NUTP, he said, had identified 20 students to be trained by the China company but this had been hampered by red tape.

“It’s been almost six months since the company mooted its proposal,” he said.

“The government must get its act together. There are too many ministries involved.”

Currently, seven ministries are overseeing TVET.

(A coordination committee has been approved by the Cabinet to coordinate TVET activities between the ministries. Separately, a TVET task force formerly headed by Nurul Izzah Anwar has suggested that a special commission coordinate the TVET implementation be set up.)

National Parent-Teacher Associations’ Vocational and Technical Consultative Council vice-chairman Abul Nasir also spoke of “outdated” TVET syllabus.

Whatever changes that have been made, he said, were insignificant in the grander scheme of things.

“TVET should be 70% machine using and practical training, and 30% for theory, where the 30% must come from the industry.

“Students need the machines to train but at this point in time, it isn’t happening because there is no sync between the vocational colleges and training institutes with the industry,” he said.

He also stressed that incentives are vital for tie-ups between TVET institutes and the industry.

Echoing feedback from teachers on outdated syllabus, National TVET Movement secretary-general Nordin Abdul Malek attributed this to poor planning.

“Not only in terms of facilities and technology, but other factors like soft skills and employment trends are not planned out well,” he said.

On Nov 16, Education Minister Dr Maszlee Malik said TVET was given emphasis during the Mid-Term review of the 11th Malaysia Plan 2016-2020 and Budget 2019.

https://www.thestar.com.my

Despite heavy TVET promotion, group says syllabus yet to move with the times

PKPB secretary-general Mohammad Rizan Hassan said the current TVET programmes lagged far behind. — Reuters pic
PKPB secretary-general Mohammad Rizan Hassan said the current TVET programmes lagged far behind. — Reuters pic

KUALA LUMPUR, Dec 13 — The technical and vocational education training (TVET) programme requires an urgent update to arm graduates with the required skills for employment, the National Association of Skilled Workers (PKPB) said today.

Its secretary-general Mohammad Rizan Hassan, in responding to a survey that found government vocational programme undervalued both by students and parents, said the current TVET programmes lagged far behind.

“Students are studying ‘history in technology’ instead of the latest technology,” he said in a statement.

“This is because the training given at vocational institutions (ILK) are still based on old technology.”

Yesterday, Khazanah Research Institute released its school-to-work transition survey (SWTS) that found TVET to be undervalued despite the strong demand for vocational and technical graduates both in the private and public sectors.

Data gathered by the survey showed a prevalent misconception about TVET being an inferior educational pathway, and that its graduates continue to be underpaid even in the civil service, data that strongly pointed to disconnect policies.

PKPB, on the other hand, said the perception that TVET graduates get quick employment is inaccurate.

Mohammad said TVET graduates are forced to compete for skilled jobs with upskilled migrant workers, which drives salaries lower.

“They are also affected by the influx of migrant workers,” he said.

“In the end, their pay is ultimately hurt,” he added.

The SWTS, held between late 2017 to earlier this year, polled over 27,000 students, job seekers, young workers and employers.

Source: www.malaymail.com

Nurul Izzah calls for TVET commission

PUTRAJAYA: The TVET task force headed by Nurul Izzah Anwar (pic) has suggested that a special commission to coordinate the Technical and Vocational Education Training (TVET) implementation be set up.

Education Minister Dr Maszlee Malik said it was suggested that the implementation under the commission be overseen by two ministries, Education and Human Resources, during a recent Cabinet meeting.

“It was an idea by Nurul Izzah to table a motion in Parliament for the establishment of a TVET commission.

“It expresses our seriousness to enhance TVET and bring it to the next level.

“She’s in the process of lobbying all ministers and MPs to support this idea.

“I hope we will make it a reality,” Dr Maszlee told reporters after attending a national industry dialogue titled “Living Skills in the 21st Century: TVET Empowerment/Initiative” yesterday.

Nurul Izzah chairs a task force to strengthen and improve TVET.

Currently, seven ministries are overlooking TVET.

A coordination committee has been approved by the Cabinet, he said, to coordinate TVET activities between the ministries.

On the duties of the task force headed by Nurul Izzah, Dr Maszlee said it is tasked to conduct research across all ministries that provide TVET education and training.

“The role of (her) committee is to make recommendations on how our TVET system can be improved.

“This includes a review of our current laws in TVET education and training, as well as the idea for a TVET commission,” he added.

Dr Maszlee said TVET was given emphasis during the mid-term review of the 11th Malaysia Plan (11MP) 2016-2020 and the tabling of Budget 2019.

This is the way forward, he said, emphasising that collaboration between the Education Ministry and industry showed “we are on the right track”.

The government also plans to conduct a major mapping exercise to ensure TVET programmes meet industry standards set by professional accreditation bodies, he added.

Source: https://www.thestar.com.my

Concern over 30% drop in numbers enrolling in skills training institutes

This will affect government’s plans to develop a skilled workforce, says minister Kulasegaran.

Human Resources Minister M Kulasegaran says financial constraints were believed to be the cause of the declining student enrolment.

SHAH ALAM: Human Resources Minister M Kulasegaran has expressed concern over the 30% drop in student enrolment into various skills training institutes over the past two years.

He said the declining number was alarming as such a scenario would damper the government’s aspiration to make Malaysia a highly-skilled nation if this trend continued to persist.

Kulasegaran said although the country had been having many technical and vocational education training (TVET) colleges, financial constraints were believed to be the cause for the declining student enrolment.

“The drop in student enrolment needs to be looked into thoroughly and I will raise this issue in the Cabinet meeting soon because we want to produce highly-skilled workers and empower them,” he told reporters after opening the Tamil Foundation Malaysia’s annual general meeting here today.

Meanwhile, Kulasegaran said his ministry was now reviewing the current minimum wage policy to give priority to the rights of Malaysians in the employment sector.

He said details of the policy would be announced on Monday.

On the programme today, the Ipoh Barat MP said the government would continue to empower the Indian community, including bringing transformation to the work sector dominated by the ethnic group.

“I was directed by Prime Minister Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad to come out with drafts of various programmes to improve the skills of the Indians and all races in the future.

“There is a special segment for the development of the Indian community mentioned in the Pakatan Harapan manifesto which covers various aspects. We will work on it.

“In fact, the Indian Community Development Blueprint of the previous administration would be examined.

“We will implement (the plan) if it is beneficial for the targeted groups,” he said.

Source: http://www.freemalaysiatoday.com