Tag Archives: Technical and Vocational Education Training

TVET curriculum to simulate actual workplace, says Kula

PETALING JAYA: The Technical and Vocational Education Training (TVET) curriculum will soon simulate actual workplace situations.

These learning modules, which look to better prepare students for the working world, will be embedded into the curriculum.

Human Resources Minister M. Kulasegaran (pic) said the modules, known as “Problem, Project, Production”, are intended to engage students with real world tasks.

These are some of the measures that will be implemented soon, he said, to strengthen and improve the TVET delivery implementation.

His speech text was read by human resources department planning and research division director Junita Mohamed Ali during the Malaysian TVET Forum 2019.

On Jan 20, StarEdu reported that a new national framework sets out to level the playing field between academics and TVET, offering students more career options for their future.

“TVET is a branch of education that cannot be overlooked by any government.

“Chief among (these measures) is to elevate the quality of TVET programmes as well as TVET instructors; it is essential for instructors, public or private, to gain industrial experience so as to ensure they will be kept abreast with technology,” said Kulasegaran.

“The plan also includes continued funding under the Skills Development Fund (SDF) for TVET students who pursue high demand programmes by industries.

“Existing SDF loan mechanism for employee upskilling and reskilling will be revamped to increase the number of recipients through a cost-sharing arrangement with the industry.

“It’s important for the industry to be deeply involved in the financing aspect of TVET.”

To further strengthen TVET delivery, Kulasegaran said TVET training institutions will need to embrace and integrate the 11 important pillars of the fourth Industrial Revolution in their training, such as Cloud Computing, Cybersecurity and Augmented Reality.

Source: https://www.thestar.com.my

Comment: Am not sure how would be the funds from SDF/PTPK be allocated but going at the current rate, looks like many private TVET institutions that depended heavily on the funding to recruit students would be closing soon.

So if you intend to set up at TVET centre, do your research properly, think what kind of students that you want to have & don’t just think about making money from their tuition fees, ensure they have bright prospects to get into employment with decent pay and your business will surely be sustainable & maybe even flourish when majority are suffering at thinking how to get loans from SDF/PTPK.

TVET, a stepchild no more

Students of Politeknik Ungku Omar get hands on training on automotive engineering at the workshop at their campus in Ipoh.

Students of Politeknik Ungku Omar get hands on training on automotive engineering at the workshop at their campus in Ipoh.

A framework has been proposed to address the long-standing problems of our TVET system

A NEW framework for technical and vocational training is in the pipelines.

If approved, the proposal will see a more streamlined, effective, and industry-relevant, Technical and Vocational Education Training (TVET) system.

Proposed by the National TVET Movement to the Economic Planning Unit last month, the framework aims to address the country’s ailing TVET system.

“Our focus is on upper secondary school students. We want to create a TVET champion.

TVET students being trained to be industry-ready. — File photo

TVET students being trained to be industry-ready. — File photo

“We want students to have better access to choices between academics and something more hands-on like TVET. This is what’s happening in other countries,” said Ahmad Tajudin, who recently retired as the Education Ministry deputy director-general.

Among those part of the Movement are the Federation of Human Resources Ministry’s Department of Skills Development (JPK) Accredited Centres (FeMac), National Council of Professors, and the National Parent-Teacher Associations’ Vocational and Technical Consultative Council.

For too long, TVET has been the “troubled stepchild” of the education system, he said.

This framework tackles long-standing problems like the:

> Overlapping of programmes and certifications;

> Misguided focus on post-secondary TVET students instead of upper secondary students;

> Existence of multiple accreditation bodies and agencies implementing TVET;

> High operations cost resulting from the many ministries involved;

> Weak policies; and

> Private TVET providers being treated as competitors.

“All TVET institutions should be streamlined, rationalised, and consolidated, under the Education Ministry.

“This ensures that teachers and trainers are better taken care of under one scheme of service. And, there won’t be a need to close down any institutions if all facilities and resources are under one roof,” he said, adding that it would also be more cost effective for the Government while ensuring smoother communication between the industry and institutions.

Other reforms proposed by the Movement include:

> Reducing existing certifications to an important few;

> Having a single accreditation body for TVET;

> Establishing two educational pathways for students to choose from;

> Allowing industries to take the lead;

> Enhancing TVET apprenticeship programmes based on models from other developed countries; and

> Formulating policies and legislations to enhance careers in TVET.

Greater emphasis, and an overview, of TVET implementation is needed, Ahmad Tajudin said.

There should be training provisions to facilitate contributions from private TVET providers, and there must be closer collaboration between the industry and these providers.

“Our TVET system needs stronger institutional coordination, and greater transparency among the multiple public agencies.

“TVET restructuring is a small part of a holistic solution, but it’s a start to the reform,” he said, adding that strong political will from the Government was crucial to ensure the country’s TVET success.

Education Minister Dr Maszlee Malik said the Government would continue enhancing the capabilities of TVET institutions and systems to remain competitive and meet industry demands.

Speaking during his annual new year address in Serdang on Monday, he said the ministry would implement a harmonised accreditation and quality assurance system to enable student mobility in TVET institutions, which includes the Malaysian Technical University Network (MTUN).

The launch of Limkokwing TVET International, a TVET Malaysia Training Centre at Limkokwing University.MOHD SAHAR MISNI/The Star

The launch of Limkokwing TVET International, a TVET Malaysia Training Centre at Limkokwing University.MOHD SAHAR MISNI/The Star

MTUN, he said, should move in the direction of Fachhochschule – Germany’s tertiary education institution specialising in topical areas.

MTUN, he added, shouldn’t be evaluated solely based on publications, but also on the ability of the graduates produced to solve technical issues.

He said the ministry plans to increase the quality and delivery of TVET by enabling the industry to lead the curriculum development, avoid overlapping of programmes and resources, improve cost effectiveness, and widen the funding to increase enrolment.

He said the ministry was also in the midst of addressing recognition issues involving controversial vocational colleges.

He assured polytechnics and community colleges that they wouldn’t be sidelined in the reform process.

“To ensure the employability of our graduates, closer collaboration between these institutions and the industry – especially with the big players – will be prioritised,” he said, adding that these were part of the ministry’s efforts in making sure that TVET, polytechnics, vocational colleges, and community colleges, are no longer seen as second choice options.

In June last year, Dr Maszlee appointed Lembah Pantai MP Nurul Izzah Anwar to chair a special TVET task force.

The duties of the task force, said Dr Maszlee, was to conduct research across all ministries that provide TVET education and training, and recommend how the country’s TVET system can be improved. This includes a review of TVET education and training laws, and the possibility of a TVET commission.

However, the TVET industry was left reeling following Nurul Izzah’s resignation as PKR vice president on Dec 17, and her decision to no longer serve the federal government in any capacity.

“We’ll continue advocating for a sustainable and effective TVET implementation,” said Ahmad Tajudin.

Source: www.thestar.com.my

Comment: It’s good that the Ministry has identified the weaknesses & looking to implement the reforms (personally, I see that our TVET sector would soar to much greater heights compared to now, if reforms are implemented effectively & correctly).

But I have a doubt whether they would reform this particular weakness – Private TVET providers being treated as competitors.

It seems that there are plans to gradually “KILL” the private TVET providers based on their proposed plans (hearsay, so take it with a pinch of salt).


These include but not limited to:

1) Closing all TVET providers that are 2 stars and below after the impending 2019 star rating process (as early as March 2019). It generally affects the smaller private TVET providers who has very limited resources (manpower & finances) vs the public TVET institutions.
2) Closing/revoke Vocational Training Operation (VTO) programme of any private TVET institutions that has does not meet a min of 4 stars and above for that particular programme. Eventually, it would be just offered by the multiple satellite campuses of CIAST, nationwide,
3) Restrict the organising of the JPK’s various induction courses (PP-PPD-PPB, PP-PPT, PPL) to only  CIAST satellite campuses, nationwide.
4) and BEYOND – perhaps you can comment if you think what they are doing/planning to do is gonna KILL the private TVET providers.

Equip all schools with Tvet facilities — KGBS

Ahmad Malie

SIBU: Sarawak Bumiputera Teachers Union (KGBS) has suggested that all schools be equipped with technical and vocational education training (Tvet) learning facilities.

KGBS president Ahmad Malie believes this is a step in the right direction to intensify learning based on Tvet.

“In that way, learning on Tvet will be known and eventually exposed to all students in the country’s education system.

“Therefore, KGBS is always ready to give holistic view to help the government through Education Ministry (KPM) to strengthen the learning of Tvet in the country’s education system and become the first choice among students in time to come,” he added yesterday.

Ahmad was asked to comment on Chief Minister Datuk Patinggi Abang Johari Tun Openg’s recent statement that the state-owned University College of Technology Sarawak (UCTS) was set up to meet the demand of Sarawak’s industrialisation programme which needs some 500,000 technical workers in the next 12 years to become an industrialised state.

Abang Johari had said this in his speech during the opening of UCTS’ inaugural Sarawak Innovation and Technology Exhibition 2018 (Saintex’18) last Thursday.

According to Abang Johari, in the past, TVET was not given much emphasis compared to the mainstream education system which focused on academic excellence. For example, only eight per cent of secondary schools in Malaysia are involved in Tvet, which is low compared to advanced countries like Germany and Switzerland, where almost 60 per cent are in Tvet. In Singapore, 75 per cent of its secondary schools are in Tvet.

On this, Ahmad said: “KGBS has stated its support since the beginning when KPM stressed on the implementation of Tvet in Malaysia’s education system.

“KGBS is always supportive of government’s efforts to focus on Tvet learning which was stressed upon by UCTS recently.

“In this regard, KGBS urged that such effort to strengthen Tvet be expedited by setting up the educational institution anywhere in our country.”

http://www.theborneopost.com

TVET getting more popular, says Human Resources Minister

Human Resources Minister Datuk Richard Riot Jaem (centre) presenting a scroll to one of the graduates at the National Dual Training System’s 3rd Convocation Ceremony at Panggung Budaya of the Sarawak Cultural Village. Pix by Goh Pei Pei

Human Resources Minister Datuk Richard Riot Jaem said TVET used to be a second option for those who did not excel academically.

“However, in the past four to five years, we noticed that students who did well academically also enrolled in TVET institutions.

“This show that there the government’s efforts, in raising awareness on the importance and potential of TVET, have worked out positively,” he said.

“Malaysia plans to have 35 per cent of skilled workforce by 2020 in order to achieve a high income nation status.

“I am confident that we can reach our target because our skilled workforce has increased from 28 per cent (in 2015) to 31 per cent this year,” he said.

Many developed countries, Richard said, also emphasised on TVET.

For instances, more then 50 per cent of the workforce in Singapore are skilled workers, he pointed out.

Speaking at the National Dual Training System’s 3rd Convocation Ceremony here, he said academic success is still relevant but there is also a need to have a workforce that is equipped with skills and technical knowledge.

He said an allocation of RM4.9 billion for TVET institutions in the 2018 Budget showed the government’s commitment towards the vision.

“I can assure you that if you are a graduate of TVET, you will have a bright future as the country needs you,” he added.

A total 173 students received their scroll at the ceremony today, having attended various courses including food preparation and presentation, homestay operation, traditional music and dancing performances and audio production.

Source: By Goh Pei Pei –