Tag Archives: TVET job

Youth and Sports Ministry enters agreement with TVET players

Youth and Sports Minister Syed Saddiq Syed Abdul Rahman speaks during the launch of SKIL'19 skill symposium in Putrajaya October 24, 2019. ― Picture by Shafwan Zaidon
Youth and Sports Minister Syed Saddiq Syed Abdul Rahman speaks during the launch of SKIL’19 skill symposium in Putrajaya October 24, 2019. ― Picture by Shafwan Zaidon
More skilled and high-paying jobs need to be created for TVET graduates, says minister

PUTRAJAYA, Oct 24 — The Youth and Sports Ministry today exchanged Statements of Understandings with five entities aimed at forging stronger cooperation between the public and private sectors in developing the Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) industry.

Witnessed by Youth and Sports Minister Syed Saddiq Abdul Rahman, the statements would see the entities play an active role in increasing career opportunities within the sector by offering spots for education and training, while offering technical advice to the ministry.

Among the signatories were Volvo Malaysia Sdn Bhd, Sapura Secured Technologies Companies, Malaysia Industry Association, the Malaysian Resources Corporation Berhad, with the cooperation of the Malaysian Prison Department.

Syed Saddiq later stressed the importance of offering former juveniles and minor crime offenders a second chance to reassimilate into society, saying one solution would be to retrain and up-skill them in opportunities within the TVET industry.

“For those who have been categorised as Individuals Under Observation, Henry Gurney leavers, we will give them a special route for them to be trained so in the end, despite them having a record, but they would be trained, re-skilled and up-skilled.

Henry Gurney Schools were set up under the Juvenile Courts Act 1947 to care for young offenders and provide formal education and rehabilitation for juvenile inmates.

“In the end they are able to be placed in companies that we share a relationship with for the TVET program,” he said after launching the SKIL 19’ Skills Symposium at the Youth and Sports Ministry Podium hall this morning.

Syed Saddiq said this and other efforts would be part of his ministry’s two pronged program, MyFuture Youth and MyFuture Youth Plus, aimed at offering reactive programs for former offenders, and proactive programs for youth who are classified within the risky category.

“For those who are in danger of falling into the group of high risk youths, we will put them through an early intervention program with special routes into TVET programmes.

“There will be long and short courses, and in the end they will be offered a job,” he explained.

He also mentioned the importance of the government’s willingness to accept former offenders into the public service, saying such steps have been brought to the attention of the Cabinet.

The Muar MP also revealed amendments to public service requirements are currently being worked out by the Chief Secretary that will see a leeway be added to consider former offenders to enter the civil service.

“This is important because if we see for those who have been jailed before, and those from Henry Gurney, about 50 to 60 per cent are youth, and a majority of them have committed minor crimes.

“But, because they don’t have targeted assistance, and if we forget or sideline them, they will go back into the community and society where their family also does not take them seriously, and not have a job, no direction in their life.

“If we (the government) are also not willing to help out, in the end they will reoffend and reenter into the same system,” he said.

Syed Saddiq stressed on the importance of breaking their cycle of crime and to offer them a second chance to assimilate back into and be a useful member of a developing society.

Additionally, the minister also added how the negative and derogatory perception towards the TVET industry should stop, and instead instil the culture of treating them as equals on par with graduates from public universities.

“If we see in Germany, the youth there are educated from a young age to understand that TVET is on par with those from public universities.

“In Malaysia, we have to instil this culture into the hearts and minds of the youth, and also the parents, as this is important to ensure that TVET will always be one of the most important growth sectors in the new Malaysia.

“But realising that dream would be impossible without the close cooperation between industry players,” he added.

Source: https://www.malaymail.com & https://www.staronline.com

Comment: Despite facts & figures showing that TVET graduates have high employability (Eg 83% for Kolej Vokasional graduates), it will still take very long time for the society to change their negative perception towards TVET.

Well, why is that so? Among them, not limited to:

1. Most of the those that took up
TVET courses are because they are academically poor & have no where to go (minority do have good academic grades too)
2. TVET jobs are generally low paying, especially in the initial years.
However, with
recognised certification, experience & good communication + people skills, income can reach 5 figures, eg like chefs, underwater welder, piping expert (O&G industry) or operating own business like dressmaking, hairdressing & beauty salon, automotive workshops.
3.
Lack of coordination between TVET institutions and industry on industrial needs also produced mismatch skills of TVET graduates, hence lower pay.

Solutions?

1. It’s ok if you, as a TVET graduate that doesn’t have SPM or fared poorly in academics, you’re now given a second chance to further to University for tertiary studies.
You may either pursue technical (Bachelor of Technology with Malaysian Technical University Network) or management related (Professional Diploma or Executive Bachelor) qualifications.
2. If you’re in the TVET industry without proper certification, you should consider to get your skills recognised via the Pengiktirafan Pencapaian Terdahulu (PPT/RPEL).
3. If you’re planning to study TVET courses, advisable to register at those that offers recognised certification like Sijil Kemahiran Malaysia (SKM), which are also warmly welcomed in many foreign countries for employment.

Occupations With The Highest Hiring Demand In Malaysia 2018/2019

If you are undecided on what skills/TVET program to study, you may want to consider jobs that employers are desperate to fill.
This also apply if you’re planning planning a change in your profession or simply starting out in your career.
Check out the Critical Occupations List 2018/2019 before you make your decision on which course to pursue or next career decision.

The Critical Occupations List (COL) shows occupations that are skilled, sought-after, and strategic across 18 sectors in Malaysia. The COL identifies shortages in occupations that are sought-after by employers. As a job seeker, this means that with the right skills, education and experience, you can increase your chances of getting hired by focusing on jobs on the COL list.

In the 2018/2019 list, a total of 59 skilled occupations were identified (Some of those in the list has a NOSS – National Occupational Skills Standard)

The COL was first put together in 2015/2016 and some occupations have been in demand since. Here are the jobs which have been on the list for three consecutive years.

  1. Finance Manager
  2. Policy and Planning Manager
  3. Business Services Manager
  4. Research and Development Manager
  5. Information and Communications Technology Manager
  6. Geologist and Geophysicist
  7. Mathematician, Actuary and Statistician
  8. Industrial and Production Engineer
  9. Mechanical Engineer
  10. Mining Engineer, Metallurgist and Related Professional
  11. Engineering Professional (Excluding Electrotechnology) Not Elsewhere Classified
  12. Electrical Engineer
  13. Electronic Engineer
  14. Telecommunications Engineer
  15. Manufacturing Professional
  16. Accountant
  17. Financial Analyst
  18. Systems Analyst
  19. Software Developer
  20. Applications Programmer
  21. Software and Applications Developer and Analyst Not Elsewhere Classified
  22. Database Designer and Administrator
  23. Systems Administrator
  24. Computer Network Professional
  25. Electronics Engineering Technician
  26. Mechanical Engineering Technician
  27. Insurance Agent

Source: Adapted from Critical Skills Monitoring Committee

If you want the FULL report, kindly email to tvetjob [at] gmail.com with your details as below:

1. Name
2. Age (To recommend courses suitable for you, if applicable)
3. HP no (in case there’s any job opening/business opportunity for you)
4. Highest Skills Qualification: Eg SKM3, DKM or DLKM
5. Highest Academic Qualification: Eg SRP, SPM, Bac of Electrical Engineering, MBA etc
6. Working experience (or resume – in case there’s any job opening)


50,000 blue-collar jobs for Malaysians are up for grabs after Japan launched a new visa programme to allow more foreigners into the country #tvetjob

Japan previously issued working visas only to people with professional knowledge and high skills, such as doctors, lawyers and teachers. Reuters

Japan is struggling with a labour shortage, and they’re looking for Malaysians to fill the gaps.

According to Kyodo News, Malaysia is planning to send blue-collared workers to Japan under a new visa programme that was launched by the latter on April 1 to let in more foreign workers into the country.

Both countries are aiming to strike a deal this July, when Malaysia’s human resources minister M. Kulasegaran visits Tokyo for the signing of a memorandum of cooperation (MOC), Kyodo News reported.

A Malaysia government official familiar with the negotiations was quoted by Kyodo News as saying: “We are working with the Japanese government to formulate an MOC on sending workers to Japan as they have opened up 14 sectors to foreigners.”

The official added that the scheme could open up 50,000 jobs in Japan for Malaysians, but it has not yet been decided which sectors will be open to Malaysian workers, Kyodo News said.

Malaysia’s Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad will also be making a visit to Japan later this month to discuss the details of the MOC.

The official also told Kyodo news that Malaysia was interested in the scheme as its government believes the country should support those willing to go abroad to earn a better salary temporarily.

Citing a small study that was conducted, the official said that the findings showed that Malaysians were willing to upgrade their skills to join any sector open to them in the visa system.

“They are excited as the higher starting salary is a major draw,” the official was quoted by Kyodo News as saying.

According to AP news, Japan previously issued working visas only to people with professional knowledge and high skills, such as doctors, lawyers and teachers.

Under the new visa system, foreign nationals with certain Japanese language and job skills will be able to apply for a resident status called Specified Skilled Worker No. 1, AP News reported.

The resident status grants foreigners working rights in 14 sectors, such as construction, farming and nursing care for up to five years.

Proficient labourers working in the construction and shipbuilding sectors can extend their stay in Japan by earning the Specified Skilled Worker No. 2 status, which will allow holders to bring in family members and renew their visa as many times as they want to.

In order to curb fears of work exploitation, the Japanese government has set up laws requiring employers to pay wages equivalent to or higher than those of Japanese nationals, and the payment should be made directly to workers’ bank accounts, AP News said.

According to Malay Mail, Malaysia will be the 10th nation that will provide foreign workers to Japan after the Philippines, Cambodia, Myanmar, Indonesia, Thailand, China, Vietnam, Nepal and Mongolia.

Source: https://www.businessinsider.my

Comment: While awaiting full details on which sector that’s included in this new visa programme, perhaps it’s time to learn some basic Japanese language NOW or even pick-up some new technical skills on part time basis!

OR you prefer to take the easy way out? To work in Singapore where food, culture & language is not too alien to you?