Tag Archives: TVET Malaysia

Government emphasises TVET but TVET not a popular education pathway…

A key aspect of the skills mismatch is between academic qualifications and technical and vocational qualifications. Malaysia’s Education Blueprints emphasise technical and vocational education and training (TVET) as essential for the needs of the labour market and economy. However, only 13% of all upper secondary students are pursuing TVET courses, while at the higher education level less than 9% are in polytechnics. It has often been noted that students and their parents regard TVET as an inferior educational pathway, ‘dead end’ and for the academically challenged. But, in fact, according to the School to Work Transition Survey (SWTS), both young job seekers and young workers consider TVET as the most useful qualification for getting a good job—the reasons for the mismatch/misperception need to be addressed. For example, the salary differential could be an important reason; the SWTS found that there is a significant wage differential between TVET graduates and those with other types of hard skills.

Only 1% of all Chinese and 4% of Indian secondary school students are pursuing technical and vocational education as compared to 15% of Bumiputera students. Despite the government’s recognition of technical and vocational education and training (TVET) as critical to meet the demands of industry and contribute to economic growth, TVET is still not attractive as an education pathway choice. A number of reasons have been identified, including the fact that TVET graduates and practitioners are not recognised as professionals and, therefore are not able to demand higher wages and career advancement. Those from such schools also have limited access to higher education institutions (EPU (n.d., pp.9-4 to 9-7). TVET is often negatively perceived as the second or last choice and only ventured into by those who do not have good academic qualifications (Cheong and Lee (2016)).

To get a good job, the most useful qualification is professional… The students were asked about the education or training they consider most useful for getting a good job (Table 2.5).

All students, irrespective of ethnicity, gender or urban-rural location, prioritise professional qualifications. This view is clearly in line with their strong preference for professional occupations.

Overall, technical and vocational skills training is the next most important qualification, after professional qualification, to get a good job – this is striking in that it contrasts sharply with the relatively low attendance in TVET schools noted in Chart 2.3.

The secondary school students appear to be aware of the importance of TVET for the job market but would rather pursue an academic education. Chinese students do not find technical and vocational skills training to be particularly important (this may be linked to their relatively low attendance at TVET schools); they put more emphasis on internships and on-the-job training and also on business management degrees. In fact, all ethnic groups recognise the importance of apprenticeship training and work experience for getting a good job. This very likely reflects their perception that employers want to hire those with work experience and that a major reason why they do not easily get jobs upon completing their education is that they do not have practical experience.

Malaysian youth can pursue an academic pathway to acquire a higher education qualification or they have the option of technical and vocational education and training (TVET) programmes that lead to the award of skills qualification (at certificate-Sijil Kemahiran Malaysia, diploma-Diploma Kemahiran Malaysia or advanced diploma-Diploma Lanjutan Kemahiran Malaysia levels). The TVET programmes are currently offered by various ministries, government agencies and private sector institutions, leading to unintended competition and duplication (MOE (2015, p.4-4)). Currently, there is a perception that TVET qualifications offer fewer attractive career and academic progression, thereby limiting the number of students who apply for such courses. The aim of the government, therefore, is to “move from a higher education system with a primary focus on university education as the sole pathway to success, to one where academic and TVET pathways are equally valued and cultivated” (Ibid., p.E-13. In addition, a TVET Masterplan is currently under study to develop skilled talent to meet the growing and changing demands of industry, promote individual opportunities for career development and ensure that the country has the skilled technical workforce it needs to reach high income status)

To get a good job, they consider TVET the most useful qualification… The job seekers, in particular the Bumiputeras and Others, identify TVET as most useful for getting a good job (Chart 4.20). This is striking when contrasted with the low ranking given to TVET by tertiary students (20% of job seekers as compared to 12% of tertiary students). It is also striking given that less than 5% of the job seekers have such qualifications (as shown earlier in Chart 4.3). The Chinese and Indian job seekers, on the other hand, feel that a professional qualification is most useful. Among all job seekers there is recognition of the usefulness of on-the-job training and apprenticeships; they recognise that work experience often counts in getting a job.

The salary range for new workers

Mean salaries offered for those with TVET qualifications are quite significantly below those for university graduates—which may help to shed light on why TVET qualifications are not popular among the young.

Employers from the public sector, public listed companies and also private contractors prefer undergraduates from local universities for skilled jobs. Other employers who indicate a preference for TVET graduates in skilled jobs include sole proprietors, private limited companies and especially private contractors. For the low-skilled or manual workers, employers do not have strong educational preferences; where there are preferences it is worth noting that the public sector and public listed companies indicate a preference for TVET graduates.

Overhaul the current TVET system
A plethora of weaknesses has been identified in the current TVET system and solutions proposed with little sustainable impact to date. The establishment by the government of a National Taskforce to reform TVET holds promise of real change—that will happen only if there is a complete structural overhaul of the system to:

– Ensure strategic coordination, importantly, by bringing the diverse and huge number of training providers (over 1,000 public and private TVET institutions) under a single effective governance body that can provide quality assurance for the skill outputs from the different institutions;
– Prioritise a demand-driven approach by ensuring close industry involvement to realistically relate training to workforce needs, including providing incentives for employers to offer WBT;
– Establish a relevant and reliable competency standards and qualifications framework for better matching and to facilitate entry of TVET graduates into universities; and
– Raise the status of TVET, including through gender-sensitive labour market information and career guidance, including introducing role models. A review of salary differentials between TVET graduates and those from other educational streams could also shed light on the issues that need to be addressed.

Source: Excerpts from Khazanah Research Institute (KRI) 2018

TVET institution-industry cooperation vital to ensure matching supply and demand – Dr Mahathir

PUTRAJAYA (July 9): A strong cooperation between the industry and Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) institutions is significantly important to ensure that there will be a matching supply and demand to enable local TVET institutions to offer high technology industry courses based on industry requirements.

Prime Minister Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad said the government believed that the cooperation would create a new breed of specialist workforce in learning the latest technology that has a spillover effect that would be able to boost economic growth and development of technology in other sectors such as agriculture, construction, health and services.

“The government believes the agenda to empower TVET with the cooperation from the industry players should be the national TVET strategic goals.

“A smart partnership between the industry and TVET institutions will help in the production of quality products and more efficient services,” he said in his keynote address at the TVET Convention here today.

To achieve that, Dr Mahathir called on more industry players to play a more active role in developing the country’s human capital and supporting the national TVET policy, especially by recognising the skills of TVET graduates and sharing their expertise with them.

Dr Mahathir said TVET programmes which involved a joint venture between public TVET institution and multinational company and based on industry needs and requirements, had proven successful with almost 90 per cent of the graduates being able to secure jobs upon graduation.

“That is why public and private TVET industry players should get out of their comfort zones and find more effective solutions.

“One of the approaches is definitely through inter-stakeholder collaboration, especially with the industry,” he said.

The prime minister said TVET would be the game-changer in the government’s efforts to produce highly-skilled local workforce, hence reducing dependency on foreign workers.

He said the government would also strive to enhance Malaysian youth capability in TVET to enable the demands of the high-tech industry to be met by the local workforce.

Source: www.theedgemarkets.com

Dr M urges major industry players to support TVET

PUTRAJAYA: The government has called on Malaysia’s major industry players to support its technical and vocational education and training (TVET) agenda.

Prime Minister Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad said the government recognises TVET as one of the keys in the country’s aspiration to become a developed nation.

“Graduates from TVET programmes that are joint ventures between public TVET institutions and multinational companies have proven to be successful, where almost 90% of TVET graduates have been able to get a job after graduation.

“Because of this, the major players such as public and private TVET institutes should get out of their comfort zone and find effective solutions.

Dr Mahathir added that producing more skilled manpower would reduce the country’s dependence on foreign workers.

“The government will continue to strive to enhance the capacity of Malaysian youths in TVET to ensure the needs of high technology industries can be met by local workers.

“This will also change the labour market in which the government can prioritise producing more highly skilled jobs that offer high income.

“This is in line with our efforts to attract high quality investments to this country,” said Dr Mahathir.

Later, Dr Mahathir engaged in a dialogue session with chief executives of the industry. Also present was Human Resources Minister M. Kulasegaran.

The theme of the two-day conference is “Human Capital Development to Enhance Future Skills Agenda”.

Source: www.thestar.com.my

NST Leader: TVET – Big room for improvement

(File pix) Only 13 per cent of all upper secondary students are pursuing TVET courses, while merely nine per cent are doing them at polytechnics. Pix by NSTP/Aizuddin SaadBy New Straits Times – June 11, 2019 @ 12:01am

THE world of technical and vocational education and training (TVET) is one of paradoxes and other mind bogglers.

Five thousand TVET and science places are waiting to be filled, yet there are no takers. Puzzlingly, too, TVET grad employability is a very high 95 per cent versus tertiary institution grad employability of an average of 80 per cent.

This the parents and students do not know, says Education Minister Dr Maszlee Malik. Little wonder, only 13 per cent of all upper secondary students are pursuing TVET courses, while merely nine per cent are doing them at polytechnics.

A 2018 report by Khazanah Research Institute (KRI) on The School-To-Work Transition of Young Malaysians lends support to the minister’s claim.

The report quotes job seekers as saying TVET to be the most useful qualification for getting a good job. Yet — here comes another mind boggler — TVET is not a popular education pathway. As Maszlee says, there may need to be a deeper analysis. We agree.

Perhaps, the problem may not be in TVET itself, but in everything associated with it. This maze must be untangled. Consider this.

There are more than 1,000 public and private TVET institutions — 565 public institutions under six ministries and 600 private institutions.

This causes a plethora of problems, says the KRI report. One such is a lack of strategic coordination. This should have been to some extent solved by the Malaysia Board of Technologies — a governance and certification body — launched on Nov 17, 2016. But fragmentation continues. The puzzle thickens.

“Low wages” appear to be standing in the way of TVET, too. To Maszlee, this is a perception problem. It may very well be. And can be solved with some generous dose of awareness.

Remuneration is based on TVET skills acquired and as the skills are upgraded along with the experience gained, salary tends to move up.

But there is hope yet. Maszlee says a cabinet-level committee is hard at work consolidating resources as well as synchronising efforts to ensure stronger branding, more effective governance, funding and accreditation structures to make TVET a primary choice for students.

We will hold our horses until the more “sexy” TVET arrives. Part of this reform involves making the TVET industry responsive, according to deputy director-general at the Education Ministry’s Polytechnic and Community College Education Department, Dr Mohammad Naim Yaakub.

The idea is, he says, to make supply match demand by way of artificial intelligence and big data. This has been the experience of many European countries. European countries have skewed their skills development policy towards encouraging such a match.

KRI sees competency-based training as critical to TVET reform. This allows for the design of practical, demand-driven courses for industry needs.

Competency-based TVET uses short modular courses geared to market industry demand, enabling students to enter the market with a defined set of skills.

Modular courses also come with additional advantages: they promote lifelong learning and are less time-intensive. The rest of the world is heading towards short “nano degrees”. We should too.

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Riot dismisses claims that TVET problematic, not systematic

TVET, a relevant choice

Source: www.nst.com.my/opinion/leaders/2019

Comment: Again, would like to point out that one factor that maybe left out is the fact that current Sijil Kemahiran Malaysia (SKM) & Diploma Kemahiran Malaysia (DKM) holders are facing stumbling block in furthering their study to higher education due to SPM qualification issues, ie passing BM & History and/or with 3 credits as per required by MQA.

Look at bigger picture, says Maszlee

Photo for representation only

KUALA LUMPUR: MORE than 5,000 technical and vocational education and training (TVET) courses and science courses offered by universities, polytechnics and technical universities have not been taken up.

Although those courses have greater job prospects, students are not enrolling in those classes.

They include sustainability science, applied plant science, forest resource technology, product development technology, natural resources science, agribusiness, applied physics, industrial chemical technology and business engineering.

Since 2017, 1,251 courses in public universities have been suspended or cancelled. This number is almost 30 per cent of the total courses offered in public universities.

“Maybe it’s not ‘sexy’ enough, but students don’t understand that those courses allow them to be employed even before they graduate,” said Education Minister Dr Maszlee Malik in an interview with the New Straits Times Press.

He cited the cybersecurity course offered by Politeknik Mersing, where students could gain employment even before graduating.

“But when it comes to TVET courses, people do not understand as it is a term that explains everything under the sun, and it may be too vast.

Kolej Vokasional Setapak fashion students staging a show in Cheras, Kuala Lumpur, recently. FILE PIC

“What I like to emphasise is that there are jobs available in those courses.”

He also said the number of non-Bumiputera students enrolling in polytechnics and technical institutions was very low, and many were focused on entering matriculation and public universities.

“It’s (matriculation) not the only path. We have Form Six, polytechnics, diploma studies and the Teachers’ Education Institute, which do not have any quota. So now, we want others to look at the bigger picture.”

However, Maszlee said there were weaknesses in the ministry’s steps to disseminate information and guide people through the options. In April, he had said the ministry was looking into rebranding TVET programmes, and this included the possibility of changing its name to a more appealing one.

He said the ministry would make TVET a mainstream education choice for students because they viewed it only as a second option and believed it might not help them much in the future.

Source: www.nst.com.my

Comment: Poor public perception aside, I think following are few other issues:
1. The Education Ministry & Human Resource Ministry has not been promoting enough about TVET courses & it’s future & more importantly, effectively.
2. If I’m not mistaken, entrance requirements to these universities, polytechnics and technical universities still requires a pass in SPM BM & History or 3 credits. This actually deprives many SKM or DKM holders who may not qualify academically but yet they are the ones that are inclined to further their study in these technical courses.

Manpower Dept aims to produce more skilled workers

Picture for representation only

SHAH ALAM: The Manpower Department aims to produce more skilled workers than its present 28%.

“We need to reach the target of 35% by 2020,“ said its director-general, Datuk Muhd Khair Razman Mohamed Annuar.

He believes they will be able to meet the target through their Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) programmes.

Muhd Khair said, currently they were in smart partnerships with private entities which conducts TVET programmes.

“Presently, there are 565 TVET public institutions under six ministries, while the private entities have over 600 institutions,“ he told theSun today after attending the Monfort Boys Town’s graduation ceremony.

“This is why the partnership with private TVET institutions is important. In order to produce a bigger percentage of skilled workers, it is vital for both private and public TVET institutions to work closely with us.

“Though TVET focuses on the technical, electronic, electrical, civil engineering, ICT, but we will diversify to hospitality courses soon, because it is a platform that nurtures the interest of the youth.

“In the long term, we want graduates to become entrepreneurs, where they can apply for funding from the skilled development corporate fund when they have undergone the programmes and obtained a certificate,“ he said.

He added that even after the graduates are working, they can upgrade their skills through the institutions recognised by the department.

“We have 32 institutions under the Manpower Department – the industrial training institutes, the Japan Technical Institute in Penang, and advanced technologies centres, which besides running full-time courses, also organise short courses to cater for working adults. Our institutions are open to 11pm.”

Muhd Khair said TVET graduates are equally competent as compared with other graduates from various colleges and universities.

Source: https://www.thesundaily.my

Cari formula supaya pekerja tidak ‘lari’ selepas ikuti latihan kemahiran – Kula Segaran

Cari formula supaya pekerja tidak 'lari' selepas ikuti latihan kemahiran - Kula Segaran
Kula Segaran mempengerusikan Mesyuarat Majlis Penasihat Buruh Kebangsaan, di Putrajaya, pada Isnin. Astro AWANI

Majikan disaran mewujudkan perjanjian bagi memastikan pekerja tidak meninggalkan syarikat selepas menjalani latihan bagi meningkatkan kemahiran diri.

Menteri Sumber Manusia M Kula Segaran berkata perlu ada formula bagi ‘mengikat’ pekerja untuk jangka masa tertentu supaya prestasi sesebuah syarikat tidak terjejas selepas menghantar pekerja mengikuti latihan kemahiran.

“Setengah majikan beritahu saya, mereka tidak mahu menghantar pekerja mendapatkan latihan kerana apabila mereka pulang, gaji perlu dinaikkan dan ada juga yang akan berhenti kerja selepas dihantar menjalani latihan kemahiran industri.

“Saya beri cadangan supaya majikan perlu menandatangani perjanjian dengan pekerja. Jika pekerja dihantar menjalani latihan, mereka perlu datang semula kepada syarikat untuk berkhidmat, umpama ‘mengikat’ pekerja selepas diberi latihan.

“Amat menyedihkan buat majikan jika pekerja meninggalkan syarikat selepas dihantar mendapatkan latihan, kerana ia akan menjejaskan perniagaan dan sebagainya,” katanya pada sidang media selepas mempengerusikan Mesyuarat Majlis Penasihat Buruh Kebangsaan, di sini, hari ini.

Menurutnya, formula kerajaan yang menaja pelajar mendapat pengajian luar negara boleh digunapakai pihak majikan untuk memastikan pekerja mereka ‘setia’ untuk terus berkhidmat

Dalam pada itu, Kula Segaran turut menekankan mengenai kepentingan memacu dasar Pendidikan dan Latihan Teknikal dan Vokasional (TVET) negara bagi meningkatkan kemahiran (up-skilling dan re-skilling) pelajar serta tenaga kerja sedia ada.

Ia katanya, selaras dengan hasrat kerajaan untuk meningkatkan tenaga mahir kepada 35 peratus menjelang 2020, berbanding hanya pada kadar 28 peratus sekarang.

Dalam perkembangan berkaitan, beliau memaklumkan telah mencadangkan kepada Jabatan Tenaga Manusia (JTM) supaya membuka pusat latihan kemahiran di institusi TVET dari jam 5.30 petang hingga 11 malam, bukan pada waktu kerja biasa dari 8 pagi hingga 5 petang.

“Ini bagi memenuhi keperluan melatih tenaga kerja sedia ada. Dan jika ia berjaya dilaksanakan, ia mampu meningkatkan gaji sedia ada sebanyak 10 hingga 20 peratus,” jelasnya.

Terdahulu, Kula Segaran ditanya berhubung isu gaji minimum, sama ada kerajaan Pakatan Harapan (PH) dapat memberi jaminan ia akan ditingkatkan kepada RM1,500 seperti yang dijanjikan manifesto PH semasa Pilihan Raya Umum Ke-14 (PRU14) lalu.

Mengulas perkara itu, Kula Segaran berkata, isu peningkatan gaji minimum perlu diperhalusi supaya majikan dan pekerja mendapat situasi menang-menang.

Sumber: http://www.astroawani.com

Komen: Betul ke formula penajaan pelajar mendapat pengajian luar negara boleh digunapakai pihak majikan untuk mengikat pekerja mereka? Pada pendapat min, pelajar kerja dengan kerajaan sebab anggap ia pekerjaan yang stabil tapi di pihak swasta, pekerja masih cenderung berkhidmat di syarikat lain bila dapat tawaran yang lebih baik setelah mereka dilatih/dipersijilkan.
Min berpendapat formula pakej penggajian yang lebih baik adalah strategi yang paling baik supaya pekerja tak tinggalkan syarikat sedia ada & kerja di syarikat lain setelah mendapat latihan/persijilan baru. Tapi, ini pula menyebabkan majikan berfikir, mengapa pula nak belanja dua kali?
Pertama, kos yuran latihan, kedua, kena tambah gaji pula lepas tu. Sekiranya produktiviti pekerja meningkat jauh melebihi kedua-dua kos ni, berbaloilah tapi min rasa kebiasaannya tidak.
Apa pendapat anda pula?

Workers can demand higher pay for better skills through TVET

Human Resources Minister M. Kulasegaran addresses the media after the  National Labour Advisory Council Meeting in Putrajaya May 27, 2019. — Picture by Terence Tang
Human Resources Minister M. Kulasegaran addresses the media after the National Labour Advisory Council Meeting in Putrajaya May 27, 2019. — Picture by Terence Tang

PUTRAJAYA, May 27 — Human Resources Minister M. Kulasegaran today urged workers to take up technical and vocational training so they can push for higher salaries.

He said this was why the ministry proposed that technical vocational education and training (TVET) centres be opened from 5.30pm to 11pm, so that employees who are working full-time can attend the training after office hours.

“So if every worker in the country is skilled, even the janitors, those who are working (as cleaners) in the toilets, if they are properly skilled, you can command a good income,” Kulasegaran told reporters after the National Labour Advisory Council meeting here. 

He cited Singapore as an example where he claimed that various personnel there have earned certifications and can be highly trained.

“If Singapore can do it, there’s no reason why we cannot do it,” the minister asserted.

When asked if Pakatan Harapan could achieve its 2018 election promise of raising the minimum wage to RM1,500 monthly within its first term of office, Kulasegaran simply restated the coalition’s manifesto pledge of doing so “within this period”.

He also indicated that with increased skills, an employee’s income can rise from the minimum wage of RM1,100, for instance, to a higher pay.

Kulasegaran said that he has presented these initiatives to the government.

TVET Malaysia was launched by former prime minister Datuk Seri Najib Razak in September 2017 after a rebranding process. It provides a variety of vocational courses.

Source: https://www.malaymail.com

2018 Budget: TVET Malaysia Master Plan unveiled, RM4.9bil allocated

All Technical and Vocational Education Training institutions previously under seven ministries will be rebranded as TVET Malaysia and placed under the Human Resources Ministry.

KUALA LUMPUR: All Technical and Vocational Education Training institutions previously under seven ministries will be rebranded as TVET Malaysia and placed under the Human Resources Ministry.

Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Razak said today that RM4.9 billion will also be allocated to implement the TVET Malaysia Master Plan.

“To encourage TVET graduates to continue their studies, the government has prepared 100 TVET Excellent Students Scholarships worth RM4.5 million,” he added.

The government will also create the National Rail Centre of Excellence in a bid to support skilled workers in the rail industry.

The centre, he said, will supervise and coordinate quality assurance, as well as national rail education and training accreditation.

Najib also said Malaysia Rail Link Sdn Bhd, in cooperation with higher education institutions, will train 3,000 professionals in the industry.

Source: NST Online

Comment: It’s good that finally efforts can be streamlined. Hopefully the Ministry of Human Resources, especially the Department of Skills Development, has the extra capacity in terms of manpower & budget to execute policies well.