Tag Archives: TVET

TVET Malaysia: 5 Reasons to Consider Technical and Vocational Education and Training

TVET Malaysia: 5 Reasons to Consider Technical and Vocational Education and Training

Planning for your career is tough. There are a thousand and one things to consider. From the cost of education, your interests, job satisfaction, pay and managing social expectations; this is not an easy undertaking. Thankfully, there are many career paths and one compelling route is Technical and Vocational Education and Training or TVET for short.

According to UNESCO, TVET is:

“those aspects of the educational process involving,

  • in addition to general education,
  • the study of technologies and related sciences and
  • the acquisition of practical skills, attitudes, understanding, and knowledge relating to occupation in various sectors of economic life.”

Technical and Vocational Education and Training consists of

  • “apprenticeship training,
  • vocational education,
  • technical education,
  • technical-vocational education,
  • occupational education,
  • vocational education and training,
  • professional and vocational education,
  • career and technical education,
  • workforce education,
  • workplace education, and others.”

Going into TVET will equip you with the practical skills that will transform you into a skilled worker ready for the real world. Increasingly, it has become more apparent that academic qualifications are not the be all end of career paths as seen with the oversupply of fresh graduates in Malaysia. However, the million RM question is this. Should you be considering TVET? Read on to let us make the case!

*Disclaimer: as choosing a career and education is an important life decision, we urge you to do more research after reading this primer.


  1. 1. Proposed Raising of Minimum Wage of Local Skilled Workers by the Govt

Kim Kardashian Money
Image Credit: Giphy.com

According to The Star and other news outlets, the Govt plans to raise the minimum wage for local skilled workers to RM3,500 up from RM1,200 — achieving parity with skilled foreign workers. This is part of the plan to eventually raise this amount to RM5,000 by 2030. This proposal was put forward by Deputy Prime Minister Datuk Seri Dr. Ahmad Zahaid Hamidi along with other efforts to meet the demand for skilled workers who underwent TVET training.

Although this may or may not come to pass, it is clear that skilled workers are in high demand in Malaysia. This effort along with others shows that the Government is committed to making this a viable career path, This is in large part due to the demand for skilled workers and the shortage in supply of skilled workers.

  1. Malaysia Needs More Skilled Workers

Skilled Workers PVET
Image Credit: Fancycrave | Pexels.com

In a meeting with the press, Malaysian Chinese Association president Datuk Seri Liow Tiong Lai called for the training  of more skilled workers that would allow Malaysia to be competitive in a variety of industries. Currently, Malaysia is facing a labor crunch in the logistics, manufacturing and agriculture industries. These industries had to resort to finding foreign workers to fill this gap. The stats back this up as well.

Compared to other developed countries, skilled workers in Malaysia consisted of only 28% of the local workforce, compared to 43% in developed countries. It is clear that there is a demand for local skilled workers that need to be filled in Malaysia. For a country to develop and progress; having skilled workers from TVET institutes are as important if not more important as having tertiary graduates.

  1. New Jobs Created in Malaysia Will Require Skilled Workers With TVET

Carpenter at work
Image Credit: Fancycrave | Pexels.com

In addition, The Sun Daily reported that out of the 1.5 million jobs that the government is targeting to create by 2020, an estimated 60% will require someone with a TVET education. This comment was made by Human Resource Minister Datuk Seri Richard Riot Jaem.

Moreover, he added that people who underwent TVET training could access a myriad of employment opportunities as business people and digital technopreneurs. Clearly, the government is behind this initiative, raising the validity of embarking on TVET and becoming a skilled worker as a career path.

  1. TVET Careers Are Promising And Rewarding

Engineers at work PVET
Image Credit: Pixabay | Pexels.com

This point is subjective but we believe that it rings true for many. Not everyone is academically inclined or well suited for tertiary education.

A TVET education is great if you fulfill these criteria:

  1. You may prefer a more hands-on approach to learning that takes place outside the classroom.
  2. You already have an ideal career or some industry you would like to work in.
  3. You may feel that studying too much is waste of time and you would like to start work and soon as possible.
  4. You would like to learn practical things in the real world.

Most of these courses will allow you to work and study giving you a higher degree of freedom. TVET will allow you to do all these things and more.

  1. Tertiary Education Is Expensive And Not Suited for Everyone

University Stress
Image Credit: Pixabay | Pexels.com

Let’s face it, university education is not for everyone. If the thought of the SPM gives you PTSD, pursuing an alternate career path may be better for you. Furthermore, studying in university is not cheap at all. An article by The New Straits Times in 2017 showed that tuition fees in the country cost an average of RM38,000 a year.

This puts a huge strain on the parents who send their children to the university as it may cost as much as half their salaries to send their children there. This fee does not include daily expenses and often many parents take up loans to send their children to university. In contrast, TVET programs are often cheaper, take less time, more flexible and offer good career prospects as well.

We hope that reading this article will provide you useful information about your future career and educational prospects. Do let us know in the comments if there is any more useful information about this topic!

Source: https://www.shopback.my/blog/tvet-malaysia-information

Minister: More than 60pc of jobs require technical and vocational education and training by 2020

Datuk Seri Richard Riot Jaem said the government is targeting to create about 1.5 million new jobs by 2020, with 60 per cent of them requiring those having Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET). — Picture by Zuraneeza Zulkifli

Datuk Seri Richard Riot Jaem said the government is targeting to create about 1.5 million new jobs by 2020, with 60 per cent of them requiring those having Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET). — Picture by Zuraneeza ZulkifliSERIAN, March 24 — The government is targeting to create about 1.5 million new jobs by 2020, with 60 per cent of them requiring those having Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET), said Human Resource Minister Datuk Seri Richard Riot Jaem.

This, he said, made TVET and important platform to enhance the skills of Malaysian work force, with 35 per cent of the skilled workers to be produced by 2020.

Towards this end, he said, the government under the leadership of Prime Minister Datuk Seri Mohd Najib Tun Razak had emphasised the need to alleviate TVET to mainstream education and with that, appointed the ministry as coordinator of TVET Malaysia.

“TVET is now seen as among the competitive field,” he told a media conference after officiating the ground-breaking ceremony for the Serian Industrial Training Institute (ILPS) here today.

He said diverse employment opportunities awaited TVET graduates, as well as to venture into business and become digital technopreneurs.

According to Riot, currently, 28 per cent of the Malaysian work-force were highly-skilled, and efforts would be made to increase it to 35 per cent in 2020.

He advised students to undertake skills training to make it easier for them to obtain jobs.

On the Serian ILP Serian project, Riot said it would be built on a  56.76 acre site in Kampung Tenggak, Serian, and cost RM300 million.

Construction work on the project would begin in May this year and expected to complete in 33 months, he said.

Riot said the ILP in Serion was scheduled to be in operation in 2021 and could accommodate 600 trainees at one time.

The Serian ILP will be the fourth in Sarawak, after the one in Miri, Kota  Samarahan and Bintulu.

Source: Bernama

Gaji minimum graduan TVET dicadang dinaikkan kepada RM3,500

Gaji minimum graduan TVET dicadang dinaikkan kepada RM3,500

Ahmad Zahid mencadangkan gaji minimum bagi tenaga kerja mahir lepasan Latihan dan Pendidikan Teknikal dan Vokasional (TVET) dinaikkan daripada RM1,200 kepada sekurang-kurangnya RM3,500.

KUALA LUMPUR: Timbalan Perdana Menteri, Datuk Seri Ahmad Zahid Hamidi mencadangkan gaji minimum bagi tenaga kerja mahir lepasan Latihan dan Pendidikan Teknikal dan Vokasional (TVET) dinaikkan daripada RM1,200 kepada sekurang-kurangnya RM3,500.

Langkah itu jelasnya, bagi menyelaraskan gaji minimum pekerja mahir dari luar negara yang kini memperoleh gaji minimum lebih daripada angka berkenaan.

“Kalau kita lihat kini pekerja mahir yang mendapat kelulusan khas expatriate oleh Imigresen Malaysia mesti mempunyai gaji minima RM3,500. Jadi kita kena samakan (gaji pekerja mahir tempatan) dengan pekerja mahir luar sekurang-kurangnya RM3,500.

“Tentunya kita mesti menaikkan kadar gaji minima pekerja mahir ini menyamai sekurang-kurangnya seperti pekerja expatriate luar negara,”katanya dalam sidang media selepas melancarkan Ekspo  TVET Malaysia 2018 di Pusat Dagangan Dunia Putra (PWTC) di sini hari ini.

Dalam pada itu, Ahmad Zahid juga mencadangkan Majlis TVET Msia diwujudkan seperti mana yang diumumkan Perdana Menteri, Datuk Seri Najib Tun Razak untuk  memperlihatkan keprihathinan kerajaan dasar program berkenaan.

Sehubungan itu satu kertas memorandum mengenai Majlis TVET Malaysia akan disediakan oleh Menteri Sumber Manusia, Datuk Seri Richard Riot sebelum dibentangkan di peringkat kabinet.

“Jika dipersetujui jemaah menteri, saya akan mempengerusikan Majlis TVET Malaysia, bukan sahaja koordinasi, tetapi juga pengiktirafan oleh sebuah badan khusus dapat dilakukan bagi membolehkan kebolehpasaran guna tenaga yang tidak diselaras,” ujarnya.

Tambahnya, Malaysia mensasarkan gaji minima tenaga kerja mahir lepasan TVET akan mencapai RM5,000 pada tahun 2030.

“Ini menggalakkan lebih ramai guna tenaga masuk ke bidang TVET ini. Saya juga mencadangkan selain kemahiran yang akan diperoleh melalui kursus , mereka perlu diberi peluang untuk dapat diploma dan ijazah supaya kombinasi ini akan membolehkan mereka berada di tahap yang sepatutnya . kata beliau lagi.

Ahmad Zahid juga menegaskan TVET bukan lagi pilihan kedua, sebaliknya menjadi pilihan pertama.

Ketika ini katanya, guna tenaga mahir Malaysia mencatatkan 28 peratus dan Malaysia mensasarkan untuk mencapai 43 peratus tenaga kerja mahir apabila negara mencapai status negara maju.

Sumber: http://www.astroawani.com

Komen: Timbalan Menteri kita ni pandai, bukan syiok sendiri, tapi nak anak-anak muda kita syiok sendiri (kan PRU dah dekat?). Kalau saya tak salah mentafsir kenyataan beliau, gaji minima bermaksud graduan yang masih mentah pun mula dengan RM3,500?
Tanyalah pengurus sumber manusia, majikan dan rata-ratanya orang ramai yang sudah jejak dunia pekerjaan, adakah kebanyakan graduan kini, tak kira kemahiran ke akademik, layak?
Kelemahan bahasa, komunikasi, sikap dsbgnya menjadi punca saya kata kebanyakannya tidak layak. Ini kerana produktiviti mereka tidak akan setimpal dengan gaji minima yang akan dibayar (jika RM3,500).
Tidak boleh dinafikan ada segolongan kecil graduan yang layak namun saya rasa ia adalah minoriti.

Apa pula kata anda?

Riot Dismisses Claims That TVET Problematic, Not Systematic

Pic: NST (Human Resources Minister Datuk Seri Richard Riot Jaem (2nd from right) with Education Minister Datuk Seri Idris Jusoh (3rd from right) attend the Technical and Vocational Educational Training (TVET) Malaysia Ministerial Coordination Committee Meeting in Cyberjaya.)Pic: NST (Human Resources Minister Datuk Seri Richard Riot Jaem (2nd from right) with Education Minister Datuk Seri Idris Jusoh (3rd from right) attend the Technical and Vocational Educational Training (TVET) Malaysia Ministerial Coordination Committee Meeting in Cyberjaya.)

KUALA LUMPUR: Human Resources Minister Datuk Seri Richard Riot Jaem today described reports that the Technical and Vocational Educational Training (TVET) was problematic with no uniformity, as inaccurate.

He said seven ministries involved – the Human Resources, Higher Education, Education, Youth and Sports, Rural and Regional Development, Works and the Agriculture and Agro-based Ministries – had all agreed to develop a synergised programme for TVET.

Riot said this was in line with Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Razak’s announcement on the implementation of TVET on Sept 27 last year and during the tabling of Budget 2018.

“This is further strengthened by the ministerial level TVET Malaysia Coordination Committee Meeting held on Jan 16, which was also attended by industry representatives,” said Riot.

“We had also agreed to implement TVET Malaysia in a more coordinated way, headed by the Human Resources Ministry.”

In a statement issued by the Human Resource Ministry today, Riot also said the allocation of RM4.9 billion through Budget 2018 proved the government’s strong commitment towards the implementation of TVET, to be utilised by the seven ministries involved.

“The Human Resources Ministry is now increasing efforts to identify issues and problems, implement programmes and initiatives and set objectives in terms of direction through the collaborative efforts between the seven ministries,” said Riot.

“This is to ensure the implementation of TVET Malaysia is in line with the domestic and international economic landscape, technological developments and requirements under the Industrial Revolution 4.0.”

Riot said, the Jan 16 meeting had also determined the need to increase skilled labour from 28 percent in 2015 to 35 percent by 2020, and consequently the need to increase the quantity and quality of TVET qualified workers to 225,000 in 2020, from 164,000 five years earlier.

He said the TVET Council, which is to be chaired by the Prime Minister, will act as the highest authority in determining the policies, implementation and coordination of TVET Malaysia.

– NST

JTM, Gamuda dan Yayasan Peneraju Jalin Kerjasama Strategik Lahir Tenaga Kerja Mahir Projek MRT

Sumber imej: The Star Online

KUALA LUMPUR, 24 Jan (Bernama) — Jabatan Tenaga Manusia (JTM), Gamuda Berhad dan Yayasan Peneraju Pendidikan Bumiputera baru-baru ini telah menjalinkan kerjasama strategik untuk melahirkan tenaga kerja mahir projek Mass Rapid Transit (MRT).

JTM dalam satu kenyataan berkata, kerjasama strategik ini merupakan latihan industri di bawah Program JTM – Peneraju Skill Iltizam iaitu program yang menjanjikan graduan lepasan TVET daripada Institusi Latihan Jabatan Tenaga Manusia (ILJTM) peluang pekerjaan dalam pembinaan 11 stesen bawah tanah untuk projek MRT Laluan Sungai Buloh-Serdang-Putrajaya (SSP) yang dijangka akan disiapkan menjelang tahun 2022.

“Menyedari akan kepentingan serta keperluan sumber tenaga manusia daripada kalangan warga tempatan dalam melaksanakan projek ini, JTM telah diberi mandat oleh Yayasan Peneraju melalui Program JTM – Peneraju Skill Iltizam bagi melatih bakal pekerja untuk berkhidmat dengan Gamuda Berhad dalam dalam projek MRT sebagai Tunnel Crew, Erector Operator dan Assistant Mechanic,” demikian menurut kenyataan itu.

JTM katanya telah merangka strategi yang khusus dalam melaksanakan Program JTM – Peneraju Skill Iltizam ini yang akan dilaksanakan pada tahun 2018.

Program ini akan melibatkan lima buah institusi yang terpilih iaitu Pusat Latihan Teknologi Tinggi (ADTEC) Kemaman, ADTEC Bintulu, Institut Latihan Perindustrian (ILP) Pedas, ILP Kota Samarahan dan ILP Kota Kinabalu.

Seramai 280 orang belia Malaysia disasarkan mengikuti latihan untuk tahun ini dan mereka akan menjalani latihan intensif selama tiga bulan di ILP dan ADTEC dan akan menjalani Latihan Industri (LI) yang khusus dalam bidang Tunneling selama tiga bulan di Gamuda’s Tunnelling Training Academy (TTA), Selangor.

Peserta yang berjaya tamat latihan akan diberi sijil ‘Skills Proficiency Certificate’ oleh City & Guilds, United Kingdom sebelum diserap menjadi sebahagian daripada krew pembinaan Projek MRT.

JTM berkata selain daripada menyediakan pekerja kepada Projek MRT, kerjasama strategik antara ketiga-tiga pihak ini juga membolehkan 200 orang belia tempatan mengikuti program Peneraju Skil Iltizam Industralised Building System (IBS) Production Technician di ILP Kuala Terengganu.

Sistem Binaan Berindustri (IBS) juga dikenali sebagai pembinaan pasang siap digunakan secara meluas di negara-negara maju kerana kaedah ini membolehkan komponen-komponen binaan dihasilkan di kilang dalam persekitaran terkawal dan dihantar ke tapak pembinaan untuk dipasang menjadi struktur dengan tenaga kerja yang minimum.

Teknologi IBS Ini secara tidak langsung dapat meningkatkan kualiti bangunan dan kerja, mengurangkan penggunaan buruh asing di tapak projek serta mempercepatkan kerja pembinaan. Melalui program ini, peserta akan mengikuti latihan kemahiran serta LI selama 5 bulan sebelum diambil sebagai pekerja IBS di Gamuda Berhad.

Sementara itu, JTM berkata penglibatan Yayasan Peneraju di dalam kerjasama ini membolehkan peserta mengikuti program ini secara percuma, selain diberikan elaun bulanan sepanjang latihan.

Program-program TVET yang ditawarkan bukan sahaja membolehkan kemahiran spesifik kepada pekerjaan dapat dikuasai dalam tempoh yang singkat, malah ianya membolehkan mereka terlibat secara langsung dalam industri pembinaan di negara ini.

Selari dengan visi JTM iaitu menjadi organisasi peneraju dalam membangunkan tenaga kerja yang berdaya saing, Program JTM – Peneraju Skil Iltizam diharap dapat melahirkan warga tempatan yang berkemahiran serta mampu memenuhi keperluan industri pembinaan.

–BERNAMA

Vocational education and training sector is still missing out on government funding: report

There is a stark difference between schools, VET and higher education spending in Australia, according to our research published today.

The Mitchell Institute’s 2017 report shows that while spending on schools and higher education continues to grow, vocational education and training (VET) expenditure is going in the opposite direction. We are spending less on VET now than we were a decade ago, in real terms.


The chart below shows the trends in expenditure over an 11-year period to 2015-16. This analysis uses 2005-06 as the base index year. Indexing enables comparison of change over time from a common starting point, which is 100 here. So, an increase from 100 to 102 would represent a 2% increase. All expenditure values are in 2015-16 dollars, converted to real terms using a GDP deflator.



This analysis was done using Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) data. While more detailed data are available for each education sector through different collections, the ABS applies the same method for estimating expenditure for each sector. This makes it the best means of making a comparison across schools, VET and higher education.

The figures include all expenditure by government entities – meaning by governments (to both public and private education providers) and also by public schools, TAFEs and universities. This gives us an approximate picture of where the dollars are flowing, and how this is changing over time.

What’s important here is the increasing disparity in expenditure growth between the sectors, particularly between VET and higher education.

VET missing out

This comparison confirms widespread concerns about VET going backwards. Expenditure in 2015-16 was 4.7% below the level in 2005-06.

This tells a worrying story about quality vocational education and training not being a priority for governments.

Key growth employment areas like aged care, early childhood education and hospitality rely on vocational training for skilled workers. Building up vocationally qualified workers in the growing service and caring industries will be essential, particularly as employment in the manufacturing sector declines.

Universities going from strength to strength

Higher education has followed a very different path. Spending has grown by 53% over the 11 years from 2005-06.

These figures include spending on more than just teaching and learning and universities have other significant sources of revenue, including international students.

Even so, it is clear that governments, and Australians collectively, are prioritising spending on university education over vocational training.

Early years catching up

This is the second time preschool has been included in this overview of education expenditure.

The chart below compares growth in expenditure on preschool, alongside the other education sectors over the same 11-year period.



Although coming off a much lower base, preschool spending grew rapidly following the National Partnership Agreement on Universal Access to Early Childhood Education in 2009. This growth reflects a growing awareness of the importance of the early years among governments.


This comparison shows where we are focusing our education resources as a nation.

These diverging patterns of expenditure across the education sectors reflect our longstanding fragmented approach to policy and funding, particularly at the tertiary level.

Under current policy settings, it is not hard to imagine the already considerable discrepancy between VET expenditure and higher education and school expenditure continuing to grow.

This report, the fourth in the series, should prompt government to consider a more strategic approach to distributing resources across the education sector.

The uneven approach between VET and higher education in particular reflects an ongoing failure to conceive of the two as part of a single tertiary education system.

This blindspot continues to act as a barrier to the creation of the responsive, integrated education and training system many are arguing is needed to sustain economic growth in a changing world.

Source: theconversation.com

Comment: Malaysia should be applauded for going the other way round but then, leakages are still rampant. Recent swindled fund of RM40 million from PTPK is a very good example. It has caused the private providers to have a very hard time recruiting students due to very low quota for funding

Ever-expanding roles, responsibilities of MOHR

Riot believes that his ministry has provided a holistic solution to the skilling, upskilling and reskilling of the nation’s workforce.

KUCHING: It comes as no surprise that the Ministry of Human Resources (MOHR) holds many duties under its purview, being the authority in charge of the Malaysian workforce.

The ministry is responsible for skills development, labour, occupational safety and health, trade unions, industrial relations, industrial court, labour market analysis and social security — to name a few — and these responsibilities continue to grow with each new facet introduced, as roles of human resources evolve with time and technology.

Take, for example, the boom of the ‘gig’ economy over the past two years triggering new income-generating trends such as Uber and Airbnb — leading MOHR to come up with new ways to protect the interests of employees in a whole new light.

First formed in 1904 as the Labour Department, it has changed its name six times over the past 114 years, riding on the massive changes in the nation’s industrial landscape and labour forces.

 

Now, MOHR oversees ten federal departments and four federal agencies:

FEDERAL DEPARTMENTS

1. Department of Labour of Peninsular Malaysia (JTKSM)

2. Department of Labour Sarawak

3. Department of Labour Sabah

4. Department of Skills Development (DSD)

5. Manpower Department (JTM)

6. Department of Occupational Safety and Health (Dosh)

7. Department of Industrial Relations Malaysia

8. Department of Trade Union Affairs (JHEKS)

9. Industrial Court of Malaysia

10. Institut of Labour Market Information and Analysis (ILMIA)

FEDERAL AGENCIES

1. Social Security Organisation (SOCSO)

2. Human Resources Development Fund (HRDF)

3. National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)

4. Skills Development Fund Corporation (PTPK)

 

The present minister, Dato Sri (Dr) Richard Riot Jaem — who was sworn in on May 16, 2013 — attributes his success to the holistic approach that he has incorporated in dealing with his ministry’s day-to-day operations and its long-term schemes implemented for the welfare and upskilling of the nation’s labour force.

In an exclusive interview with The Borneo Post, Riot admits that his role as the Minister of Human Resources has been a learning experience in itself.

“To be very frank, when I first came into the ministry, I thought it was only going to deal with labour issues.

Only after coming in did I realise the huge responsibility I had on my shoulders.

It was really going to be a tough job,” he shares.

From looking after the interests and welfare of employees in Peninsular Malaysia, Sarawak and Sabah, to ensuring adequate training and development of the country’s future workforce, the MOHR is involved with anything and everything to do with the affairs of the Malaysian workers.

Following the goals set out under the 11th Malaysia Plan (11MP), Riot aims to build a world-class workforce through steady increases in the percentage of skilled workers up to 35 per cent by 2020.

Today, employers and employees nationwide stand to gain from these numerous programmes and plans being put in place.

Employers can utilise MOHR’s skill development facilities and schemes provided to upskill or reskill their employees, allowing them to enhance their human capital and drive innovation from within.

Meanwhile, SPM holders who have no plans to pursue academically oriented tertiary education are encouraged for technical schools to gain better employment prospects, while high-skilled diasporas are slowly but surely being wooed back home to take on the high-skilled roles that need to be filled urgently.

All of this has contributed greatly to the expansion of the Malaysian economy and society as a whole, helping MOHR bring to life the government’s vision of having a competent and skilled workforce.

Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Tun Razak (second left) visits the exhibition held in connection with the launch of TVET Malaysia at Adtec Shah Alam. On the prime minister’s left is Riot. — Bernama photo

 Skilling, upskilling and reskilling

To achieve this task, Riot says he and his ministry has been focusing on skilling, upskilling and reskilling the labour force through various schemes and programmes that are being made available by the different departments and agencies to the wider public.

Most notably, the skilling of youths is regarded as one of the most vital functions of the MOHR as it ensures the future survivability of industries by providing them with an adequate workforce.

“I always encourage graduates from our Malaysia Skills Certificate (MSC) Level 3 Programmes to re-enrol to MSC Level 4, in order to pursue our diploma courses to continue gaining skills as it will greatly increase their livelihood down the line,” Riot shares.

For SPM School-Leavers with no plans to pursue academically oriented tertiary education, the ministry encourages them — via awareness campaigns — to enrol into one of its 32 technical institutes across the country.

Of the 32, 24 provide various technical and vocational education and training (TVET) certificate courses to the public, with eight having diploma programmes for certificate-holders.

Besides increasing the number of certificate and diploma holders, Riot stresses that the quality of graduates is equally crucial.

“We need to produce a labour force that is equipped with the right knowledge, skills and attitude to thrive in the globalised economy where emerging new technology, digitalisation and ‘Industry 4.0’ have drastically changed what is needed for the average worker.

“Because of this, we have introduced new syllabuses to ensure that our workforce would be able to meet the needs and standards of our changing industries.”

These efforts have been fruitful, discloses Riot, as revealed by the high employability percentage reported for graduates from Miri’s Industrial Training Institute (ILP) and Shah Alam’s Advance Technology Training Centre (Adtec).

“I’m very happy to say the employability rates amongst our graduates are 92 per cent — 92 per cent (of the graduates) showcasing exactly how important TVET skills are to workers nowadays,” he says.

Adding to this, the MOHR has been pushing hard especially for youths to embrace technical courses, as it is anticipated that 60 per cent of our industries would require employees who are technically skilled in the near future.

 Focus on current workforce

With much focus being placed on youths, it appears that many members of the workforce are unable to participate due to prior financial obligations.

To address this, MOHR makes available several programmes to accommodate those currently working — some under the HRDF, and one under the DSD.

The schemes under HRDF are tailored for employees already in the workforce who are looking to upskill or reskill themselves in order to increase their career prospects.

Employers may actively participate in many of HRDF’s programmes by sending their workers for further training.

Besides that, the DSD also provides a programme called the ‘National Dual Training’, which pairs up citizens with paid apprenticeships at selected companies where they may receive offers of employment after graduating from the programme.

This programmes focuses on 30 per cent classroom learning and 70 per cent on-thejob learning, to ensure that the graduates would be able to adapt to their new jobs with ease upon completion of the course.

The skilling of youths is regarded as one of the most vital functions of the MOHR as it ensures the future survivability of industries by providing them with an adequate workforce. — Bernama photo

 Recognising prior experience learning

Riot also recognises that not all workers need further training as they may have already obtained the appropriate experience from long years on the job.

Still, they may lack the formal credentials to justify their skills.

“A lot of people in Malaysia — including Sarawak — are already very skilful with their hands, but they lack the paper accreditation that acts as proof of their skills to employers.

“A worker may be a very good carpenter or welder but because he doesn’t have formal credentials, upon seeking employment he may find that his pay is much lower than what he should be receiving because he is regarded as an unskilled labour,” Riot explains.

Understanding that this would deny a significant part of the local workforce from appropriate wages and bright career paths, Riot discloses that his ministry alongside with the Defence Ministry launched a recognition of prior experiential learning on Feb 22 this year, to help anyone with prior experience or skills from a variety of industries to officially obtain diplomas certifying their abilities.

Each applicant would be assessed in terms of their skills and competency to see if they qualify for the diploma accreditation.

According to Riot, so far more than 1,000 people have registered for the scheme, with 300 due to graduate with diplomas by the end of this year.

“While this scheme is mostly geared towards former Armed Forces personnel, I would like to stress that it is open to those who seek to upgrade themselves for better job prospects and better recognition of their skills and abilities.

“As far as Armed Forces go, they register with Perhebat (Armed Forces Ex-Servicemen Affairs Corporation), but the civilians can either register with the HRDF, or directly with the ministry (MOHR).

” Overall, Riot believes that his ministry has provided a holistic solution to the skilling, upskilling and reskilling of the nation’s workforce.

He adds that while there has been some concern on whether or not Malaysia would be able to meet the goal of 35 per cent skilled workers by 2020, he is confident that the target remains achievable.

“We have about two years to go before reaching 2020 — I am very confident that the 35 per cent target as required by the government can be achieved.

“In order to do so, I would like to especially promote the ministry to Sarawak as I believe there is still a lack of awareness and misconception of what MOHR actually does.

“I believe Sarawakians are still not fully aware of these benefits and opportunities they can obtain from MOHR,” he points out.

Riot looking at the interview registration prosses at the Job Fair organised by the Ministry of Human Resources at UTC Kuching on May 20, 2017.

Source: http://www.theborneopost.com/

Only 7% go for technical, vocational skills after Form Three

KUALA LUMPUR, Nov 20 — Only 7 per cent of students across the country take up Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) after their Form Three.

Deputy Education Minister, Datuk P. Kamalanathan said various efforts had been implemented to increase the entry of students into TVET institutions and vocational colleges, besides giving them exposure on career prospects after graduating from the vocational colleges.

“The Education Ministry has been transforming the TVET since 2012 to uplift the status of this stream as a premier stream to help realise the government’s aspiration of meeting the country’s need for skilled workers by 2020,” he said in reply to a question from Nurul Izzah Anwar (PKR-Lembah Pantai) in the Dewan Rakyat, here, today.

To a supplementary question from Dr Mansor Abd Rahman (BN-Sik) on the ministry’s strategies to increase rural students’ enrolment into the vocational colleges, Kamalanathan said the measures included making publicity broadcasts via the radio channels, newspaper advertisements and collaboration with non-governmental organisations.

He said online applications for entry into the TVET institutions for the 2018 session had been opened and many applications had been received thus far.

Besides the Education Ministry, six other ministries involved in implementing the TVET are the Human Resources; Higher Education; Works; Youth and Sports; Rural and Regional Development; and Agriculture and Agro-based Industry ministries.

Source: Bernama

Preparing Malaysians for the work of the future

The integration of on-the-job training and lifelong learning into TVET curriculum can ensure that graduates are job-ready, yet adaptable to changing skills requirements.

“WHAT do you want to be when you grow up?” This is one question we have all been asked at one point in our lives, whether the answer requires a 350-word essay or just one-word, usually referring to a job.

How does one answer this same question today with automation taking place and the fact that many jobs of the future do not exist yet?

A good example is social media jobs. It is hard to imagine a high-paying social media job a decade ago and this same job may be completely transformed in the near future, if it still exists at all.

Over one-third of skills that are considered important in today’s workforce will probably have changed five years from now based on research by the World Economic Forum (WEF). The young people today will need a portfolio of skills and capabilities to navigate the complex world of work in the future.

In fact, a report by Deloitte University Press on “Re-imagining Higher Education” predicts that 50 per cent of the content in an undergraduate degree will be obsolete within five years due to the impact of digital transformation.

While we talk about the future of work — which jobs will disappear and which will remain — we also need to shift the focus to understand the skills and capabilities in demand.

Another WEF report, The Future of Jobs, identified complex problem solving, critical thinking and creativity as the top three skills out of 10 that workers will need in 2020.

Although active listening is considered a core skill today, the report said that it will completely disappear from being an important skill at the workplace. Instead, emotional intelligence is said to become one of the top skills needed by all in the future.

Linear careers, where the path begins with the choices you made in the subjects you studied at university before entering the world of work, will be far less common. There is a strong need to constructively engage employers in changing the education system in the years to come.

The allocation of RM4.9 billion for TVET (technical and vocational education training) institutions in the 2018 Budget is definitely more necessary now than ever before to prepare for the work of the future.

Malaysia plans to have 35 per cent of skilled workforce by 2020 to achieve a high-income nation status. The government has also set a goal to increase the country’s percentage of skilled workers to 45 per cent by 2030. It is about time the country upgrades its TVET system.

If there is one thing that TVET can do is that it could provide a means of tackling unemployment. Vocational education tends to result in a faster transition into the workplace and countries that place greater emphasis on TVET have been successful in maintaining low youth unemployment rates.

However, a negative social bias has often prevented young people from enrolling in TVET. Although vocational subjects are more varied, they are often poorly understood.

Many people associate vocational track programmes with low academic performance, poor quality provision and blocked future pathways that do not lead to higher education. Young people and parents shun vocational education, which they regard as a “second-choice” education option.

Academic subjects are valued more highly than vocational ones. Medicine, law and engineering are seen as career options with huge earnings potential. Several academic studies also caution against specialising vocational subjects at a young age because they are more specific and directly related to particular occupations.

For TVET to be valued as the equal of academic education, further education providers should not be overlooked.

The integration of on-the-job training and lifelong learning into TVET curriculum can ensure that graduates are job-ready yet adaptable to changing skills requirements. The funding is necessary so that TVET institutions can upgrade learning environments and invest in professional development. In return, it can raise teaching quality by increasing the qualification levels of the instructors and making pedagogical training obligatory.

Finland is one example of TVET success — a result of external and internal policy shifts — that we can learn from. The country’s systematic efforts since 2000 to upgrade the quality and status of TVET has lead to an increased percentage of application for the programmes from the Finnish youth.

TVET institutions in this country received the same basic and development funding as general education institutions. The curriculum has been restructured to include the national core curriculum required for access to university, as well as strong on-the-job training and lifelong learning components. TVET students are allowed to progress to further studies at university or applied sciences level.

Many parents’ worst nightmare is seeing their child aimlessly chasing dream without achieving anything. It is time that we should retire asking the young ones on what they want to be when they grow up.

Instead, we should provide accurate information and exposure to where future jobs will exist, including the skills to craft and navigate their careers.

It looks like learning and adapting will become more apparent in the future of workforce. As more students will find themselves doing work that does not exist, we should prepare them intellectually, socially and emotionally to continuously adapt to changes.

Source: www.nst.com.my

 

TVET getting more popular, says Human Resources Minister

Human Resources Minister Datuk Richard Riot Jaem (centre) presenting a scroll to one of the graduates at the National Dual Training System’s 3rd Convocation Ceremony at Panggung Budaya of the Sarawak Cultural Village. Pix by Goh Pei Pei

Human Resources Minister Datuk Richard Riot Jaem said TVET used to be a second option for those who did not excel academically.

“However, in the past four to five years, we noticed that students who did well academically also enrolled in TVET institutions.

“This show that there the government’s efforts, in raising awareness on the importance and potential of TVET, have worked out positively,” he said.

“Malaysia plans to have 35 per cent of skilled workforce by 2020 in order to achieve a high income nation status.

“I am confident that we can reach our target because our skilled workforce has increased from 28 per cent (in 2015) to 31 per cent this year,” he said.

Many developed countries, Richard said, also emphasised on TVET.

For instances, more then 50 per cent of the workforce in Singapore are skilled workers, he pointed out.

Speaking at the National Dual Training System’s 3rd Convocation Ceremony here, he said academic success is still relevant but there is also a need to have a workforce that is equipped with skills and technical knowledge.

He said an allocation of RM4.9 billion for TVET institutions in the 2018 Budget showed the government’s commitment towards the vision.

“I can assure you that if you are a graduate of TVET, you will have a bright future as the country needs you,” he added.

A total 173 students received their scroll at the ceremony today, having attended various courses including food preparation and presentation, homestay operation, traditional music and dancing performances and audio production.

Source: By Goh Pei Pei –