Tag Archives: vocational training

Concern over 30% drop in numbers enrolling in skills training institutes

This will affect government’s plans to develop a skilled workforce, says minister Kulasegaran.

Human Resources Minister M Kulasegaran says financial constraints were believed to be the cause of the declining student enrolment.

SHAH ALAM: Human Resources Minister M Kulasegaran has expressed concern over the 30% drop in student enrolment into various skills training institutes over the past two years.

He said the declining number was alarming as such a scenario would damper the government’s aspiration to make Malaysia a highly-skilled nation if this trend continued to persist.

Kulasegaran said although the country had been having many technical and vocational education training (TVET) colleges, financial constraints were believed to be the cause for the declining student enrolment.

“The drop in student enrolment needs to be looked into thoroughly and I will raise this issue in the Cabinet meeting soon because we want to produce highly-skilled workers and empower them,” he told reporters after opening the Tamil Foundation Malaysia’s annual general meeting here today.

Meanwhile, Kulasegaran said his ministry was now reviewing the current minimum wage policy to give priority to the rights of Malaysians in the employment sector.

He said details of the policy would be announced on Monday.

On the programme today, the Ipoh Barat MP said the government would continue to empower the Indian community, including bringing transformation to the work sector dominated by the ethnic group.

“I was directed by Prime Minister Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad to come out with drafts of various programmes to improve the skills of the Indians and all races in the future.

“There is a special segment for the development of the Indian community mentioned in the Pakatan Harapan manifesto which covers various aspects. We will work on it.

“In fact, the Indian Community Development Blueprint of the previous administration would be examined.

“We will implement (the plan) if it is beneficial for the targeted groups,” he said.

Source: http://www.freemalaysiatoday.com

Malaysia has what it takes to attract MNC investments: GE Malaysia CEO

SUNPIX/ADIB RAWI

KUALA LUMPUR: Malaysia has all the key ingredients to attract multinational companies (MNCs) to invest here but more could be done in terms of providing skilled labour, said General Electric (GE) Malaysia CEO Datuk Mark Rozario (pix).

“Talent, particularly new graduates, that’s probably one area that could improve but that’s not unique to Malaysia. If you think about university education, what’s lacking are things like critical thinking. The kind of skills that are required by industries are normally never fulfilled by just doing a university course.

“But the government is doing a lot in that area as well, they’ve got things like TVET (Technical and Vocational Education and Training), vocational training, internships; so continue doing that. The other thing that probably needs to be done is for the country to move away from the reliance of cheap labour, which the government is also doing,” he told SunBiz in an interview.

Rozario was one of the speakers at the recent 2018 APCAC Business Summit, which was hosted by the American Malaysian Chamber of Commerce. Themed “Charting a Bold Future: US Businesses in the Asian Century”, the event shed light on US investments in Malaysia and the region.

For GE, which has been here since 1975, the environment in Malaysia is very conducive and all its key businesses, namely, aviation, power, oil and gas and healthcare, are present here today.

“We have invested in things like iCentre (monitoring and diagnostics centre) that we described just now, which is the only one in Asia Pacific for GE; one for the oil and gas industry and the other for power. The one for oil and gas is a global centre and is one of three centres, with the other two in Florence, Italy, and Houston, US. The centres operate in eight-hour shifts,” said Rozario.

He said the reason iCentre is sited in Malaysia is because of the infrastructure that is available here, such as broadband with good coverage and skilled labour, while cost of talent is competitive compared with the rest of the region.

“When you talk about Industry 4.0, one of the first jobs that would go are those semi-skilled jobs. Here in GE, we don’t have any requirement for unskilled labour. All our employees here have to be quite highly skilled.”

According to him, GE’s aircraft engine workshop in Subang employs 300 staff, all of whom are Malaysians. He said the facility, which is a global business servicing more than 40 airlines, used to have expatriate staff but with the transfer of technology and skills over the years, it now has 100% Malaysian staff.

The facility overhauls jet engines and is the only facility outside the US with the capability for GE’s latest LEAP jet engines, which is for the Airbus A320neo and the Boeing 737 MAX.

“Again, why is it sited here? Because we have the infrastructure, the logistics ability for the engines to be sent here by cargo. The engines are taken off the aircraft and flown over to the workshop. We have the logistics, we have the availability of talent. I think the environment here is very conducive for multinationals to have their operations here,” he added.

GE’s main businesses in Malaysia are aviation, power, oil and gas, and healthcare.

Source: http://www.thesundaily.my

21 disadvantaged girls graduate from cosmetics company’s course

(Standing, from left) NCOW co-chairmann Datuk Ramani Gurusamy, L'Oreal Malaysia senior corporate communications executive Susan Koh, YWCA president Joanne Yeoh, VTOC chairman June Yeoh (standing, second from right) and Loh (standing right) with the graduates.

(Standing, from left) NCOW co-chairmann Datuk Ramani Gurusamy, L’Oreal Malaysia senior corporate communications executive Susan Koh, YWCA president Joanne Yeoh, VTOC chairman June Yeoh (standing, second from right) and Loh (standing right) with the graduates.

Twenty-one Malaysian women from underprivileged backgrounds are now certified hairdressers and make-up artists, after completing the 12-month L’Oreal Malaysia’s Beauty For A Better Life programme.

They graduated at a lively ceremony held at the Vocational Training Opportunity Center (VTOC), witnessed by their proud instructors and family members.

At the event, the graduating class of 2017 put together a graduation hair and makeup show, showcasing their skills by presenting three different looks – Glamour, Romantic and Rock.

The L’Oreal Foundation launched Beauty For A Better Life worldwide, extending a helping hand to young, disadvantaged women in more than 20 countries from Latin America, Asia and the Middle East, Africa and Europe.

Ten women successfully graduated from the programme last year, and three of them secured a job at Centro Hair Salon in The Gardens Mall, Kuala Lumpur, immediately after completing the training.

This year, L’Oreal Malaysia expanded the programme to include a new category, Beauty Care to give participants skills and knowledge required for the make-up industry.

The programme encompasses six months of comprehensive training that includes courses on makeup, bridal and nails.

Graduates of the programme also get the chance to intern at leading cosmetic stores such as Shu Uemura, Urban Decay and YSL Beauty, allowing them to gain first-hand experience.

L’Oréal Malaysia corporate communications director Jean Loh said, “Last year, we had 12 girls who graduated as certified hairdressers through Beauty For A Better Life.

“This year, with the introduction of the Beauty Care programme, we are immensely proud to see 21 young women graduates.

“In line with our company’s credo, L’Oreal Malaysia believes that regardless of their background or financial ability, these girls should be given equal opportunity to obtain the skills and tools needed to integrate themselves into society.

“By helping them achieve the first step of acquiring knowledge, we can give back to the community and encourage these ambitious young women to make a difference in their own lives,” said Loh.

The L’Oreal Malaysia’s Beauty For A Better Life programme was made possible through a partnership with the National Council of Women’s Organization (NCWO) and the VTOC by YWCA.

As a leading advocate of women’s rights, NCWO unites women’s organisations to respect, protect and fulfil human rights, promote the development and advancement of women at all levels, advocate and monitor the full participation, inclusion and representation of all women in decision-making, as well as ensure equitable access for women as agents and beneficiaries in national development.

VTOC, a project of YWCA Kuala Lumpur, provides vocational training for employment to young women and girls from economically-disadvantaged segments of Malaysian society.

Since its inception in 1998, a total of 1,524 young women have benefited from its courses.

Read more at https://www.thestar.com.my/metro/metro-news

Vocational education and training sector is still missing out on government funding: report

There is a stark difference between schools, VET and higher education spending in Australia, according to our research published today.

The Mitchell Institute’s 2017 report shows that while spending on schools and higher education continues to grow, vocational education and training (VET) expenditure is going in the opposite direction. We are spending less on VET now than we were a decade ago, in real terms.


The chart below shows the trends in expenditure over an 11-year period to 2015-16. This analysis uses 2005-06 as the base index year. Indexing enables comparison of change over time from a common starting point, which is 100 here. So, an increase from 100 to 102 would represent a 2% increase. All expenditure values are in 2015-16 dollars, converted to real terms using a GDP deflator.



This analysis was done using Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) data. While more detailed data are available for each education sector through different collections, the ABS applies the same method for estimating expenditure for each sector. This makes it the best means of making a comparison across schools, VET and higher education.

The figures include all expenditure by government entities – meaning by governments (to both public and private education providers) and also by public schools, TAFEs and universities. This gives us an approximate picture of where the dollars are flowing, and how this is changing over time.

What’s important here is the increasing disparity in expenditure growth between the sectors, particularly between VET and higher education.

VET missing out

This comparison confirms widespread concerns about VET going backwards. Expenditure in 2015-16 was 4.7% below the level in 2005-06.

This tells a worrying story about quality vocational education and training not being a priority for governments.

Key growth employment areas like aged care, early childhood education and hospitality rely on vocational training for skilled workers. Building up vocationally qualified workers in the growing service and caring industries will be essential, particularly as employment in the manufacturing sector declines.

Universities going from strength to strength

Higher education has followed a very different path. Spending has grown by 53% over the 11 years from 2005-06.

These figures include spending on more than just teaching and learning and universities have other significant sources of revenue, including international students.

Even so, it is clear that governments, and Australians collectively, are prioritising spending on university education over vocational training.

Early years catching up

This is the second time preschool has been included in this overview of education expenditure.

The chart below compares growth in expenditure on preschool, alongside the other education sectors over the same 11-year period.



Although coming off a much lower base, preschool spending grew rapidly following the National Partnership Agreement on Universal Access to Early Childhood Education in 2009. This growth reflects a growing awareness of the importance of the early years among governments.


This comparison shows where we are focusing our education resources as a nation.

These diverging patterns of expenditure across the education sectors reflect our longstanding fragmented approach to policy and funding, particularly at the tertiary level.

Under current policy settings, it is not hard to imagine the already considerable discrepancy between VET expenditure and higher education and school expenditure continuing to grow.

This report, the fourth in the series, should prompt government to consider a more strategic approach to distributing resources across the education sector.

The uneven approach between VET and higher education in particular reflects an ongoing failure to conceive of the two as part of a single tertiary education system.

This blindspot continues to act as a barrier to the creation of the responsive, integrated education and training system many are arguing is needed to sustain economic growth in a changing world.

Source: theconversation.com

Comment: Malaysia should be applauded for going the other way round but then, leakages are still rampant. Recent swindled fund of RM40 million from PTPK is a very good example. It has caused the private providers to have a very hard time recruiting students due to very low quota for funding

Thai & Malaysia students to gain from Taiwan’s policy

More scholarships offered to academic staff and students from the region.

TAIWAN’S NEW “Southbound” policy will mean more educational opportunities for people from all Asean countries, including Thailand.

“In line with the policy, our government will offer more scholarships for academic staff and students from Southeast Asian nations to boost the development of the region’s human resource,” said Taiwanese Education Minister Pan Wen-chung.

Fifteen scholarships are being granted via the Thai Ministry of Education, which is also covering Bt20,000 personal expenses per month for Masters Degree students and Bt15,000 for undergraduate students besides a Bt40,000 contribution towards the tuition fees.

“We want to help Thai lecturers, most of whom have Masters Degrees to study for their PhD in Taiwan via this scholarship scheme,” said Pan. “We are also creating a platform for Thai and Taiwanese universities to work together and we are also organising human resources training.”

Taiwan would expand its foreign student quota, particularly for those from Asean countries, in the academic year 2018, he added.

In 2016, Taiwan granted 193 scholarships for undergraduates from Asean countries. while also giving a further 984 language learning scholarships and 100 scholarships for lecturers from these countries.

In that same period, Taiwan had 12,000 students from Malaysia, 5,000 students from Indonesia, 4,700 students from Vietnam and 1,700 students from Thailand. The ministry expected the number of Asean students to rise in future.

Besides scholarships, Taiwan also offered human resources training for Asean countries on various subjects, including academic, industry, vocational promotion or executives’ business administration, Pan said. “What Taiwan wants is to pass on its experience and knowledge to Asean countries,” Pan said, adding that Taiwan was looking at hiking Taiwan-Asean investments in education to a value of Bt1 billion.

President Tsai Ing-wen administration’s “new southbound policy”, which came from a proposal by the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP), was clear that a priority should be to strengthen ties with Southeast Asian nations and India, as well as Australia and New Zealand.

As some critics feared this policy might not last long if Taiwan’s opposition Nationalist Party, also known as Kuomintang, won power, Pan affirmed the policy would remain as it concerned education. This policy was also useful to Taiwan, he said citing the increase in the number of visitors from Southeast Asia to Taiwan, which is safe and friendly to visitors.

Taiwan’s capital Taipei is home to 100,000 foreign partners and children of Taiwanese nationals. The biggest immigrant group is Vietnamese, followed by Indonesian, Myanmar and Thai.

To help educate them in their original languages the ministry would add Asean language courses in primary schools, Pan said.

Starting in 2019, every primary school in Taiwan will include seven Asean languages as elective subjects: Thai, Vietnamese, Malaysian, Burman, Indonesian, Cambodian and Filipino.

Besides the private businesses in Taiwan those in the wooden furniture industry also want to invite Asean people for training in furniture design and related technology.

“Many Taiwanese have invested in Southeast Asia. We have capital and technology but we don’t have the raw materials. So we are ready and willing to train new people if the government can promote this as an educational scheme under the new southbound policy,” said Mauson Industrial Co’s general manager Hsu Michael.

Jason Huang, director of the Taiwan Woodworking Machinery Association in Taichung City, said businesspeople were ready to train Asean people as many had already invested in the region.

The association has supported an industrial-academic cooperation training programme in furniture and carpentry at National Taipei University of Technology and next year, 40 Vietnamese students will undergo one-year vocational training course there.

At National Formosa University, a well-known technical institute in Huwei District, Yunlin County, study programmes in engineering and technology are popular among students from Southeast Asia.

Most of the foreign students were Chinese Malaysians who were studying undergraduate programmes as the university .

One lecturer, Assistant Professor Arnold Wang, said 18 Malaysian students were studying a programme comprising eight months of teaching classes and four months of internship.

Two of these students would be awarded full tuition coverage based on highest grade averages.

The university also wants to introduce courses at Malaysian institutes with a high population of Chinese Malaysian students, such as Taylor’s University Subang Jaya in the Malaysian State of Selangor.

A Malaysian student identified only as Daniel said he chose to study at Formosa due to its prestigious mechanical engineering courses and the opportunity of internship at a real workplace. He said being taught in the Chinese language posed no difficulty to him and although it was more expensive than studying in Malaysia, Daniel said it was worth it.

Another student, Chan Kwan Chen from the Malaysian State of Kedah, agreed, saying that studying in Taiwan offered new opportunities and experiences compared with studying in his home country.

Having some relatives in Thailand, the young man said he knew too little about Thai institutes and hoped to learn more.

Source: http://www.nationmultimedia.com

Go for hybrid education system, suggests Razak Baginda

August 22, 2017
He says there should be 50% vocational and 50% academic training, including at university level.
razak-bagind-1

PETALING JAYA: Centre for Global Affairs Malaysia (Icon) president Abdul Razak Baginda has suggested that Malaysia implement a hybrid system of education which combines vocational and academic training.

He was commenting on the country’s high number of unemployed graduates.

Recently, Bernama reported that 54,103 graduates were unemployed last year even after six months of completing their studies.

Higher Education Minister Idris Jusoh said the number was based on the Graduands Detection Survey System (SKPG), which recorded 238,187 students at institutions of higher learning had completed their studies last year.

Speaking to FMT, Razak said part of the problem was that the education system in the country was too streamlined.

“Not everyone is going to be a rocket scientist or a brain surgeon.

“So there’s no need for so much emphasis on academic training while completely ignoring vocational training,” he said.

“On the other hand, we do have vocational schools but we don’t have vocational schools at a higher level.

“That means that if you go to a vocational school, then you are doomed to be a mechanic from a certain level for the rest of your life. There are very few avenues for you to go above that.”

He noted that universities offered internship programmes but said this wasn’t enough.

He said a hybrid system was being practised in some advanced countries such as Germany, but civil servants in Malaysia weren’t creative enough to think of such a solution.

“We should be more creative and think of a hybrid system which is 50% vocational training and 50% academic training,” he said.

“Some people say that when you graduate from a university, you know how bicycles are made but you don’t know how to ride a bicycle. So what’s the point?

“The idea of a hybrid system is you can ride a bicycle and you know how it works, and at the same time you know how to repair it.”

Pakatan Youth pledges a million jobs and affordable homes

Pakatan Youth pledges a million jobs and affordable homes
Amanah Youth deputy chief Faiz Fadzil says Pakatan Harapan Youth will create a million semi-skilled and skilled jobs, and a million affordable houses when it takes over the federal government. – The Malaysian Insight pic by Zainal Abd Halim, July 25, 2017.
PAKATAN Harapan (PH) Youth will make job opportunities and affordable housing a priority in its manifesto for the upcoming 14th general election.

These include creating a million semi-skilled and skilled jobs, and a million affordable houses if the opposition coalition takes over Putrajaya.

Amanah Youth deputy chief Faiz Fadzil said jobs can be created in the 3D (dirty, difficult, dangerous) sector merely by raising the minimum wage from RM1,000 to RM1,500.

Faiz also dismissed Deputy Prime Minister Ahmad Zahid Hamidi’s assertion that youths are uninterested in 3D jobs, which caused employers to hire foreign labour to fill such positions.

“We will create skilled and semi-skilled jobs for graduates who qualify.

“We will also raise labour wages so interested locals will take up 3D jobs. Zahid said Malaysians were not interested in 3D jobs. I think that statement is unfounded,” he told a press conference at Amanah headquarters in Kuala Lumpur today.

He said the RM500 raise would be jointly funded by the government and employers using a fair cost-sharing mechanism, and the plan would be implemented within the first five years of a PH administration.

PH Youth also aimed to provide a million affordable homes by 2020 and to establish a body to be in charge of providing affordable homes.

A “housing x-change” mechanism would also be set up to ensure that affordable homes go only to those who need it to curb property speculation, which includes setting a national ceiling price for affordable homes at between RM250,000 and RM300,000, depending on location.

PKR Youth chief Nik Nazmi Nik Ahmad pointed out that foreign labour issues have yet to be resolved despite several legalisation measures simply because Malaysia followed a low-pay economic model.

Nik Nazmi, who is Selangor executive councillor for education, human capital, science, technology and innovation, said this model is used by many countries, but the minimum wage here has not been increased.

“We’re addicted (to the economic model). So when the people cannot live with the low pay, we hire foreign workers,” Nik Nazmi said.

Using the PKR-led Selangor government as an example, he said PH Youth would focus on providing vocational training as an alternative and would not rely on the low-pay economic model which encouraged hiring foreign labour. – July 25, 2017.

PM agrees Kapit needs vocational college

Good news for students in Kapit!

KUCHING: Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Tun Razak has agreed to a suggestion that Kapit Division needs a vocational college.

Minister of Land Development Tan Sri Datuk Amar Dr James Jemut Masing said he shared this vision of a technical institute with Najib during the PM’s visit on Tuesday.

“People of Kapit Division have given up a lot for the construction of three dams. And the power produced by the three dams will be used elsewhere. So it is only fair that we get something back in return,” the Baleh assemblyman told The Borneo Post yesterday.

“We hope a vocational college will be set up here to train our people so that they can participant in the construction of the Baleh Dam. We want to be participants of the mega project and not as bystanders.”

The hydroelectric power (HEP) dams in Kapit Division are the completed Bakun and Murum HEP dams as well as the upcoming Baleh HEP dam.

Upon the completion of Baleh Dam, all three would be able to produce a total 4,700MW of electricity to support industries in the Sarawak Corridor of Renewable Energy (SCORE).

“With the setting up of the college, there will be no need for our youth to travel to Kuching, Miri or Mukah to seek vocational training. They can stay put in Kapit. This in turn will help parents to save money spent on their children’s education,” said Masing.

He pointed out that Kapit folk are forward-looking and open to change and development.

“They know that the building of the Baleh Dam is a game-changer as the construction of the dam will bring about the opening of roads, linking to other places. It is true. With the dam, the SCORE Road — an 80km road connecting the dam to Kapit will be built.

“And along SCORE Road, there are over 100 longhouses with about 10,000 residents. These people know that with road accessibility, the whole area will be open up for development,” he said.

Masing said the villagers are looking forward to changes brought about by greater accessibility.

“So apart from the vocational college, it is also the hope of the people affected by the dam to see electricity being provided for them after the construction of the dam. Sarawak Energy Bhd (the contractor of the dam project) must commit to ensure that,” he added.

At present, the longhouse folk along the SCORE Road still depend on generator sets for electricity, which is costly especially when the price of fuel is high.

Read more: http://www.theborneopost.com/2015/06/18/pm-agrees-kapit-needs-vocational-college/#ixzz3dTdKGhFN

National Service to teach technical and vocational skills

New-look for National Service programme from 2016 onwards to include private sector involvement.

Hishammuddin_khidmat-negara_600PUTRAJAYA: Technical and vocational skills are to be taught to trainees in the National Service programme to prepare them for the job market, says defence minister Hishammuddin Hussein.

The new skills will add value to current modules on patriotism and unity and involve the private sector, he said.

Cabinet approval was sought last week, he said, for the new programme to be included in the 11th Malaysia Plan.

Hishammuddin said the involvement of the private sector would mean that the certificates given out would have more value, and the private sector would not simply reject job applications from former National Service trainees.

He expressed confidence that the new National Service session could begin early next year, after feedback on the new plans had been obtained from all concerned parties next week.

The prime minister, Najib Razak, had announced in his Budget speech in October that the National Service programme would be reviewed and new skills introduced. In January he also announced that this year’s programme would be postponed, to save RM400 million in costs, and allow a review.

More than 800,000 youths have undergone National Service training since it was introduced in 2004.

– BERNAMA