Tag Archives: TVET courses

HELLO. CANNOT. What You CANNOT do if you fail SPM

Moteefe

FAIL SPM?

Now, since GSC admin said this phrase “HELLO. CANNOT.” and popularized by netizens, let’s see what you CANNOT do if you fail SPM.

1. Generally, you are not able to work in any government agency@appointed to any government position as most of it requires a min pass in SPM or equivalent, except for very few positions that only require PMR/PT3 or talents.

Fail SPM - No Government Job at SPA

2. You CANNOT further your study directly to an MQA accredited diploma program in higher education institutions. However, there are few other options for you to further study, to be shared later.

3. You CANNOT be an air stewardess/steward@cabin crew@flight attendant. As I know, SPM is a MUST. Not sure things have change or not.

Fail SPM - CANNOT be Cabin Crew

4. Your chances of employment in Singapore is at a disadvantage as the government of SG requires a min in SPM or equivalent for employers to hire you at a lower levy. Here are some figures for you (2016 data)
If foreign workers account for 25-40% of your company, and if you don’t have SPM, then the levy would be S$700. 10-25% would bring it to S$550, and those below 10% would be S$420. (With SPM, the amount would be cut by S$100, and so on) – according to Verna Ling, a Malaysian’s experience working in Singapore.

Image may contain: 1 person

How to Overcome it?

1. Well, if you really insist to be in the public sector@government servant, you only have once choice. Resit for whichever paper that you failed in your SPM (usually it is BM or Sejarah). My personal opinion, just forget about it. Be a freelancer, self made entrepreneur or join the private sector. Work harder in the field that you like, it should be more rewarding than being a ‘clean’ government servant.

2. This is the core of this website’s focus, skills/TVET education. Further study options if you fail SPM in BM version can be found here. So, what can you do if fail SPM?

a) Take up a skills/TVET program that you have interest/good at.
Eg. you may like cooking, repairing electronic items at home, heavy interest with cars and it’s mechanics. So naturally, courses that suits you could be culinary, industrial electronics and automotive technicians respectively. You could still have a good career, if not brighter than those academic graduates.

b) So what’s next after getting skills certificate@Sijil Kemahiran Malaysia (SKM)? Good news is that you can also further to an executive degree or academic Bachelor or Masters degree later in life.

c) With SKM, the world is yours. Not just Singapore, you will be surprised that it’s widely accepted worldwide, by countries like UAE, China, Australia (basically Commonwealth countries)

d) If you don’t intend or have the heart to study now, no problem. You may work for few years first to gain industry experience and when ready to further study, you may take up APEL A examination to gain entry to study Bachelors (21 yeas old and above) or Masters Degree (30 yeas old and above) at selected University.

Expect a recession in 4 to 6 months, says chief statistician

Recession 2020
Credit image: Forbes.com

Recession

A recession is a macroeconomic term that refers to a significant decline in general economic activity in a designated region. It had been typically recognized as two consecutive quarters of economic decline, as reflected by GDP in conjunction with monthly indicators such as a rise in unemployment.

SINGAPORE: The Malaysian economy is about to feel the full impact of the Covid-19 pandemic, according to the country’s top statistician.

After posting its slowest growth since the global financial crisis, the economy is set to slip into a recession in the next four to six months, according to a report by Mohd Uzir Mahidin, the chief statistician.

With its borders shut to foreigners and a standstill in commerce around the world, industries including tourism and aviation have been crippled, adding uncertainty to a rebound in trade in the first quarter.

The expected decline comes as the country’s gross domestic product grew marginally at 0.7% in the first three months of the year, the lowest since the third quarter of 2009, he said.

That growth rate is significantly less than the 3.9% to 4.2% expansion expected, with losses of RM22.8 billion (US$5.3 billion) in economic output because of a countrywide lockdown, he said.

Countries across the world began the “Great Lockdown” in March.

“From the early indications in April and May 2020, the economic environment is foreseen to be unfavourable for Malaysian businesses,” according to the report, entitled the Malaysian Economic Statistics Review.

With the global lockdown, “this unprecedented situation has caused a sharp contraction to the economy like never before.”

Source: Bloomberg.com

Comment: Is your job secured in this coming recession? This time around, things are a bit different. Even traditionally recession-proof career like early childhood educator might be at risk, due to the lockdown. Otherwise, it is relatively recession-proof. You should consider either upskilling or reskilling if your current skills are going to be less relevant or totally obsolete post-MCO/CMCO.

Among the skills that I highly recommend is to brush up your digital marketing skills as digitalisation is a must in the new norm.
And if you really hate to deal with screen and IT-related kinds of stuff, here are some other options:

Accounting course if you love numbers
– Industrial automation if you like robotics & machinery (great prospect especially in the glove manufacturing industry during this pandemic)
Baking & Culinary if you like baking & cooking (Just like early childhood industry, F&B industry may look bleak in this year or until a vaccine for Covid-19 is found).

There are many other TVET courses that lead to jobs/careers that are not only recession-proof but also in high demand.

So, what is your interest?
What course would you like to study?
If you’re unsure or know what you want to study but don’t know where, just state your interest here.

How to Make Bread – Without Breadmaker in 7 Easy Steps (Home Baking)

Baking bread (and bun) without breadmaker (video)

If you’re looking to learn a
full time bakery or pastry course, you may leave your details here
Here’s another version of baking bun without breadmaker -11 year old Malaysian girl

Baking bread at home is simple and fun, you can learn And if you/your children intend to make a career out of baking or pastry production, there are proper skills/TVET courses that you/they can consider to pursue.

Eg. Pastry production course provides students the contemporary skills and techniques to prepare and present a wide variety of baking and pastry items suitable for a bakeshop, café or patisserie kitchen.

Successful graduates have a proven track record of succeeding in various industries ranging in top dining outlets, hospitality and food production, to manufacturing, vocational education and retail businesses, and even international competitions!

Baking bread without breadmaker (Instructional steps)

How to Make Bread without breadmaker
How to Make Bread without Breadmaker

This is an easy, basic recipe for bread that does not require much skill.

There are many ways to make bread and this is one of them (and in my opinion, a very simple way). Remember, bread making is not an exact science.

Step 1: Baking bread – Tools, Equipments & Materials (TEM)

Baking bread - TEM

You will need:

  • Yeast – 2 Tbsp
  • Hot-ish* water – 2 cups
  • Bread flour – 5 cups total, 2 for the sponge and 3 for later. (NOT regular flour)
  • Sugar – 2 Tbsp.
  • Salt – 2 tsp.
  • Oil – 2 Tbsp.
  • 3 loaf pans
  • Quick-read thermometer
  • Oven pre-heated to 375

*Hot-ish means between 95 and 115 degrees F. much colder and it won’t activate, much warmer and it will kill the little guys.

Step 2: Make the Sponge

Baking bread - Make the Sponge
Baking bread - Make the Sponge

This recipe uses what I call a “sponge.” The sponge will activate the yeast and get things started; getting the yeast warm, happy, and ready to go

Start by mixing the hot water and the flour. Then, add 2 Tbsp. sugar, 2 Tbsp. oil, 2 Tbsp. yeast, and 2 tsp. salt.

Let this sit for about 8 or 10 minutes. Assuming your water was hot enough, it should be nice and bubbly.

Step 3: Add Some Flour and Knead It

Baking bread - Knead It

Now you need to add about 3 more cups of flour. I added a little less this time, it really depends on the humidity and how exact your measurements were in the sponge step.

Once it gets too tough to stir, flip it onto a clean floured surface. Now, knead away, adding flour as you do so.
Knead the dough for 8 or 9 minutes. As my Mother says, it should be the texture of your earlobe when it’s done kneading.

When you finish this part put it back in the bowl and cover it with a slightly damp towel.

Step 4: Let It Rise…

Baking bread - Let It Rise

let the dough rise in a warm place for about 45 minutes to an hour. the dough should be about doubled in size by the time it’s finished.

Step 5: Into the Pans

Baking bread - Into the Pans

Punch the dough down (Yes, punch it. Beat the heck out of it. Just don’t make a mess), then divide it into 3 parts. Spray the pans and put the dough in. Let it rise again in the pans (covered) until it looks like the second picture.

Step 6: Into the Oven

Baking bread - Into the Oven

Preheat your oven to 375 F and put the loaves in.
Bake them for about 25 minutes. Your quick read thermometer should read between 180 and 190 degrees. Pull the loaves out and place them on their sides on a rack, after a few seconds slide them out of the pans and onto the rack. Let them cool.

Step 7: Eat!

Credit: https://www.instructables.com/

Inspired to baking bread on your own? There are many instructional videos and articles on the web.

But if you/your children would like to take it up as a career, invest in a good program with a proper TVET college/institute.

Odacité GIF - Find & Share on GIPHY

Is TVET route better since more and more academic graduates are facing unemployment in Malaysia?

TVET route
Image credit: Unirazak

TVET route – Really better than academic?

Referring to the article published by NST on 3/3/2020, our 21 public-sector universities and 38 private-sector universities produce something like 51,000 graduates a year, but nearly 60% remain unemployed one year after graduation, according to a study in 2018 conducted by the Minstry of Education Malaysia’s Graduate Tracer Study.

There are many factors contributing to this, such as mismatch of skills (most academic programs are based on theory only but not practical in the real world), poor language skills (especially English), interpersonal & communication skills etc.

TVET Route

However, those who studies TVET courses may have a better chance of being employed @ high marketability. There’s also pathway for TVET graduates to further study to University level (despite failing/no credit for History or BM for SPM, whether for management related programs like those offered by Unirazak or pure technical degrees leading to Bac of Technology, offered by the 4 public universities collectively known as MTUN.

So, even if you excel academically, academic route may not be the best choice except for certain professional programs like law, medicine, pharmacy etc where academic pathway is the only option.

Under the TVET route, there are hundreds of TVET/skills programs for you to choose from. You may refer to the National Occupation Skills Standards (NOSS) Registry by downloading from the site, as a guide. However, not all programs are offered by the public & private TVET/skills centres, accredited by Department of Skills Development (DSD)@Jabatan Pembangunan Kemahiran (JPK).

More enquiries on TVET matters

If you need further counselling on what TVET/skills courses to pursue or consultation to set up a TVET/JPK accredited centre (make sure your program is at least 6 months – 1 year and available in the NOSS, feel free to contact us at various channels stated here.

Poor SPM Results? Here’s What You Can Do Next To Further Your Education, ALL The Way to DEGREE! (Updated from 2019)

Updated from 2019’s post

Poor SPM Results? What’s Next?

So, the day of reckoning is over and you’ve gotten your SPM results.

If your results aren’t as you expected, or if you fell short on some subjects that you thought you could have scored, it’s okay to feel gloomy or guilty that you didn’t utilise more of your time to study.

But after a week of being down in the dumps, it’s probably time for you to pick yourself up again. After all, SPM is just a small test in the grand scheme of things. Chances are, no one is going to harass you about it before the year ends.

So instead of crying about it, here are 5 things you can do if your SPM results are not as good as you anticipated.

#1. Appeal your grades

Poor spm result what to do next - 1 Appeal your grades

If you are seeking to meet the entry requirements for your desired pre-university course, or if you think your grades are right below the borderline to a higher grade, you can try getting your paper marked again.

With a fee to part with (RM100 per subject), you can have your papers remarked and hopefully (fingers crossed!), you will be able to attain a higher grade that will open doors to various opportunities.

To submit an appeal, you will need to fill up a form called Borang Permohonan Penyemakan Semula Keputusan Peperiksaan/Kes T, which is on the Board of Examination Malaysia (Lembaga Peperiksaan Malaysia) website. You can also find it at any of these places:

  • Your school
  • Assessment and Examination Unit / Sector (Sektor / Unit Penilaian dan Peperiksaan)
  • State Department of Education (Jabatan Pendidikan Negeri)
  • Examination review counter in the Board of Examination Malaysia in Putrajaya (Kaunter Semak Semula Lembaga Peperiksaan Putrajaya)

You need to make sure that your form reaches the Board of Examination Malaysia’s office within 30 days after SPM results are announced or else it will not be processed. Your reviewed results will be posted to you 2 months after the appeal deadline. Ensure that you attach the following required documents:

  • verified copy of your official SPM 2019 results
  • verified certificate or copy of your pentaksiran berdasarkan sekolah (PBS) or school-based assessments by your school principal or Pegawai Kerajaan Kumpulan A

*Incomplete forms will not be processed.

#2. Retake your subjects

Poor spm result what to do next - 2 Retake your subjects

If you are not confident that having your papers reviewed will improve your grades, or if you want to aim for a higher grade, perhaps you can choose to resit your papers.

For a step-by-step guide on repeating your SPM subjects, click here.

Do note that for SPM Ulangan in Junethere are only 3 subjects that you can register for. These include:

  • Mathematics
  • Bahasa Melayu
  • Sejarah

If you’d like to retake papers for other subjects, you will need to register as an SPM private candidate and sit for the papers with the rest of the present year SPM students in November / December.

You will need to consider this option thoroughly as it will take another year for you to obtain better grades. By then, your peers may have already completed a year of their pre-university studies so be sure to make it count!  

Resitting papers is usually for students who are looking to enter specific pre-university or degree courses. So if you are looking to study a foundation course and you’re just shy of one credit, this is an option you can consider!

#3. Pursue diploma or certificate courses

Poor spm result what to do next - 3 Pursue diploma or certificate courses

If you’re missing a couple of credits from your SPM slip, you can also consider other pathways, such as pursuing a diploma or certificate. After all, they can still lead you to selected degree courses.

For a start, a diploma only requires 3 credits at SPM. Upon completion, you can then progress to the second year of a relevant degree. This makes your total study duration similar to taking a foundation then a degree.

Certificate courses, on the other hand, typically require only 1 credit, as long as you pass Bahasa Melayu and History. Completing a certificate will allow you to progress to a diploma and subsequently a degree.

So if you think retaking your papers will not change your grades, you may consider these alternatives, provided that you meet the entry requirements.

#4. Pursue skills/TVET certificate & diploma courses

If you don’t have enough credits but intend to pursue an academic diploma, some University or University Colleges also accept Sijil Kemahiran Malaysia (SKM) as an entrance requirement.

No worries, if you don’t have any credit or worse still, failed in your SPM (parents force you to complete SPM despite your interest is in skills based programs), you can always pursue your interest in skills/TVET courses.

Remember, pursuing skills/TVET courses should not be your last resort but must be your interest. Studies has shown that graduates with skills are much more employable – 80 to 90 per cent of them are able to get a job after six months upon graduation (vs graduates from academic background. Those taking cert/diploma/degree in business studies, marketing, information technology, social science courses will find it hard to land a job, unlike those who take Technical and Vocational Education Training (TVET) courses.

#5. Contact us (Finding TVET course despite poor SPM results)

If you are undecided on what course or where to pursue your TVET/skills courses, you can get in touch with us here or call us at +6012 3123430. We will be happy to help!

At the end of the day, it doesn’t matter if your SPM results are good or bad because it’s not the end of the road yet. There are still plenty of things you can do to secure your future. Many have managed to become successful, even without a string of As.

Credit: https://eduadvisor.my (Points 1-3 are from them)

Youth and Sports Ministry enters agreement with TVET players

Youth and Sports Minister Syed Saddiq Syed Abdul Rahman speaks during the launch of SKIL'19 skill symposium in Putrajaya October 24, 2019. ― Picture by Shafwan Zaidon
Youth and Sports Minister Syed Saddiq Syed Abdul Rahman speaks during the launch of SKIL’19 skill symposium in Putrajaya October 24, 2019. ― Picture by Shafwan Zaidon
More skilled and high-paying jobs need to be created for TVET graduates, says minister

PUTRAJAYA, Oct 24 — The Youth and Sports Ministry today exchanged Statements of Understandings with five entities aimed at forging stronger cooperation between the public and private sectors in developing the Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) industry.

Witnessed by Youth and Sports Minister Syed Saddiq Abdul Rahman, the statements would see the entities play an active role in increasing career opportunities within the sector by offering spots for education and training, while offering technical advice to the ministry.

Among the signatories were Volvo Malaysia Sdn Bhd, Sapura Secured Technologies Companies, Malaysia Industry Association, the Malaysian Resources Corporation Berhad, with the cooperation of the Malaysian Prison Department.

Syed Saddiq later stressed the importance of offering former juveniles and minor crime offenders a second chance to reassimilate into society, saying one solution would be to retrain and up-skill them in opportunities within the TVET industry.

“For those who have been categorised as Individuals Under Observation, Henry Gurney leavers, we will give them a special route for them to be trained so in the end, despite them having a record, but they would be trained, re-skilled and up-skilled.

Henry Gurney Schools were set up under the Juvenile Courts Act 1947 to care for young offenders and provide formal education and rehabilitation for juvenile inmates.

“In the end they are able to be placed in companies that we share a relationship with for the TVET program,” he said after launching the SKIL 19’ Skills Symposium at the Youth and Sports Ministry Podium hall this morning.

Syed Saddiq said this and other efforts would be part of his ministry’s two pronged program, MyFuture Youth and MyFuture Youth Plus, aimed at offering reactive programs for former offenders, and proactive programs for youth who are classified within the risky category.

“For those who are in danger of falling into the group of high risk youths, we will put them through an early intervention program with special routes into TVET programmes.

“There will be long and short courses, and in the end they will be offered a job,” he explained.

He also mentioned the importance of the government’s willingness to accept former offenders into the public service, saying such steps have been brought to the attention of the Cabinet.

The Muar MP also revealed amendments to public service requirements are currently being worked out by the Chief Secretary that will see a leeway be added to consider former offenders to enter the civil service.

“This is important because if we see for those who have been jailed before, and those from Henry Gurney, about 50 to 60 per cent are youth, and a majority of them have committed minor crimes.

“But, because they don’t have targeted assistance, and if we forget or sideline them, they will go back into the community and society where their family also does not take them seriously, and not have a job, no direction in their life.

“If we (the government) are also not willing to help out, in the end they will reoffend and reenter into the same system,” he said.

Syed Saddiq stressed on the importance of breaking their cycle of crime and to offer them a second chance to assimilate back into and be a useful member of a developing society.

Additionally, the minister also added how the negative and derogatory perception towards the TVET industry should stop, and instead instil the culture of treating them as equals on par with graduates from public universities.

“If we see in Germany, the youth there are educated from a young age to understand that TVET is on par with those from public universities.

“In Malaysia, we have to instil this culture into the hearts and minds of the youth, and also the parents, as this is important to ensure that TVET will always be one of the most important growth sectors in the new Malaysia.

“But realising that dream would be impossible without the close cooperation between industry players,” he added.

Source: https://www.malaymail.com & https://www.staronline.com

Comment: Despite facts & figures showing that TVET graduates have high employability (Eg 83% for Kolej Vokasional graduates), it will still take very long time for the society to change their negative perception towards TVET.

Well, why is that so? Among them, not limited to:

1. Most of the those that took up
TVET courses are because they are academically poor & have no where to go (minority do have good academic grades too)
2. TVET jobs are generally low paying, especially in the initial years.
However, with
recognised certification, experience & good communication + people skills, income can reach 5 figures, eg like chefs, underwater welder, piping expert (O&G industry) or operating own business like dressmaking, hairdressing & beauty salon, automotive workshops.
3.
Lack of coordination between TVET institutions and industry on industrial needs also produced mismatch skills of TVET graduates, hence lower pay.

Solutions?

1. It’s ok if you, as a TVET graduate that doesn’t have SPM or fared poorly in academics, you’re now given a second chance to further to University for tertiary studies.
You may either pursue technical (Bachelor of Technology with Malaysian Technical University Network) or management related (Professional Diploma or Executive Bachelor) qualifications.
2. If you’re in the TVET industry without proper certification, you should consider to get your skills recognised via the Pengiktirafan Pencapaian Terdahulu (PPT/RPEL).
3. If you’re planning to study TVET courses, advisable to register at those that offers recognised certification like Sijil Kemahiran Malaysia (SKM), which are also warmly welcomed in many foreign countries for employment.

Dr M: TVET to be prioritised to enhance people’s income

Watch the video at Astro Awani‘s FB Page on Shared Prosperity Vision

Prime Minister Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad said the move was important to “upskill” the people to be more capable and efficient, and be able to do more “sophisticated work”. – NSTP/MOHD FADLI HAMZAH


PUTRAJAYA: The government will place priority on technical and vocational education and training (TVET), in efforts to increase the people’s income, under the Shared Prosperity Vision.

Prime Minister Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad said the move was important to “upskill” the people to be more capable and efficient, and be able to do more “sophisticated work”.

“The income gap between the rich and poor is too wide so we need to increase the people’s income.

“But we don’t want to do this by just increasing wages but (we want) to improve their capacity so that they are more productive, and give them training so that they are more capable and efficient.

“For example, we are already in the aerospace industry, and even some parts of airplane engines assembly are being done in Malaysia.” he said this after chairing a special cabinet meeting on the Shared Prosperity Vision here, yesterday.

Dr Mahathir said the cabinet has agreed that TVET played an important role in improving the skills of workers and that training must be made a priority.

“Our (2020) Budget would prioritise such areas. If there is not enough money for all, we would have to lessen the budget for other areas with lesser priority,” he added.

Dr Mahathir said the government would also give focus to poorer states, reducing wealth disparities from richer states.

He listed Kelantan, Perlis and Kedah as among the three poorest states in Malaysia.

“Another gap is between the urban and rural areas, where those living in urban areas are richer than those staying in the rural areas.

“So a programme must be created to increase the income of those living in the rural areas,” Dr Mahathir added.

In explaining further, Economic Affairs Minister Datuk Seri Mohamed Azmin Ali said the government would apply the spirit of shared prosperity in the 2020 Budget, and prioritise sectors such as TVET and skills training.

“This will be given consideration by the Finance Ministry to be refined in the 2020 Budget.”

The Shared Prosperity Vision was announced by Dr Mahathir at the tabling of the mid-term review of the 11th Malaysia Plan in October 2018 in Parliament.

Its framework was also explained by the prime minister in his May 9 speech earlier this year in conjunction with Pakatan Harapan’s one year in government.

The Shared Prosperity Vision will encompass the 12th and 13th Malaysia Plans, spanning 10 years from 2021 to 2031.

Source: https://www.nst.com.my/

Comment: Not sure how the government is going to prioritise the TVET sector. As Tun M mentioned that if budget is insufficient for all, then it has to be channeled to the priority sectors. So I would assume that more funds are to be allocated to the sector, such as more funds to PTPK to loan students, especially from the B40, which are mainly from rural areas & also the urban poor. Hopefully this would then enhance this group’s earning capability and reduce the income gap.

For the benefit/knowledge of those outside TVET industry, insufficient PTPK loan in the past 1-2 years has caused many students (esp B40 group) that is interested to pursue
TVET courses unable to continue their studies at private & government TVET institutions.

This has an economic & social impact:


1. Economic
Effect on TVET institutions – With the limited quota provided to TVET institutions, especially the private ones, many has folded up or
ready for sale as they couldn’t sustain the business due to over-reliance on loan to recruit students.

Effect on TVET trainers & supporting staffs – These trainers who have SKM in their field and
Vocational Training Operation (especially those that do not have industry experience but fresh from TVET institutions like CIAST) would probably be now jobless or work in non-related field that pays them nothing more than a SPM school leaver’s qualification.

Effect on students – As the students who may not even have SPM or poor SPM results, they have no where to upgrade themselves or learn a skills to uplift their economic livelihood.

2. Social
Since the students are not able to further their studies, they may have high probability of being unemployed or worse still, involved in petty crimes, become Mat Rempit, drug addicts, gangsterism and other illegal activities.

Occupations With The Highest Hiring Demand In Malaysia 2018/2019

If you are undecided on what skills/TVET program to study, you may want to consider jobs that employers are desperate to fill.
This also apply if you’re planning planning a change in your profession or simply starting out in your career.
Check out the Critical Occupations List 2018/2019 before you make your decision on which course to pursue or next career decision.

The Critical Occupations List (COL) shows occupations that are skilled, sought-after, and strategic across 18 sectors in Malaysia. The COL identifies shortages in occupations that are sought-after by employers. As a job seeker, this means that with the right skills, education and experience, you can increase your chances of getting hired by focusing on jobs on the COL list.

In the 2018/2019 list, a total of 59 skilled occupations were identified (Some of those in the list has a NOSS – National Occupational Skills Standard)

The COL was first put together in 2015/2016 and some occupations have been in demand since. Here are the jobs which have been on the list for three consecutive years.

  1. Finance Manager
  2. Policy and Planning Manager
  3. Business Services Manager
  4. Research and Development Manager
  5. Information and Communications Technology Manager
  6. Geologist and Geophysicist
  7. Mathematician, Actuary and Statistician
  8. Industrial and Production Engineer
  9. Mechanical Engineer
  10. Mining Engineer, Metallurgist and Related Professional
  11. Engineering Professional (Excluding Electrotechnology) Not Elsewhere Classified
  12. Electrical Engineer
  13. Electronic Engineer
  14. Telecommunications Engineer
  15. Manufacturing Professional
  16. Accountant
  17. Financial Analyst
  18. Systems Analyst
  19. Software Developer
  20. Applications Programmer
  21. Software and Applications Developer and Analyst Not Elsewhere Classified
  22. Database Designer and Administrator
  23. Systems Administrator
  24. Computer Network Professional
  25. Electronics Engineering Technician
  26. Mechanical Engineering Technician
  27. Insurance Agent

Source: Adapted from Critical Skills Monitoring Committee

If you want the FULL report, kindly email to tvetjob [at] gmail.com with your details as below:

1. Name
2. Age (To recommend courses suitable for you, if applicable)
3. HP no (in case there’s any job opening/business opportunity for you)
4. Highest Skills Qualification: Eg SKM3, DKM or DLKM
5. Highest Academic Qualification: Eg SRP, SPM, Bac of Electrical Engineering, MBA etc
6. Working experience (or resume – in case there’s any job opening)


Poor SPM Results? Here’s What You Can Do Next To Further Your Education

So, the day of reckoning is over and you’ve gotten your SPM results. Poor SPM results?

If your results aren’t as you expected, or if you fell short on some subjects that you thought you could have scored, it’s okay to feel gloomy or guilty that you didn’t utilise more of your time to study.

But after a week of being down in the dumps, it’s probably time for you to pick yourself up again. After all, SPM is just a small test in the grand scheme of things. Chances are, no one is going to harass you about it before the year ends.

So instead of crying about it, here are 5 things you can do if your SPM results are not as good as you anticipated.

#1. Appeal your grades

Poor spm result what to do next - 1 Appeal your grades

If you are seeking to meet the entry requirements for your desired pre-university course, or if you think your grades are right below the borderline to a higher grade, you can try getting your paper marked again.

With a fee to part with (RM100 per subject), you can have your papers remarked and hopefully (fingers crossed!), you will be able to attain a higher grade that will open doors to various opportunities.

To submit an appeal, you will need to fill up a form called Borang Permohonan Penyemakan Semula Keputusan Peperiksaan/Kes T, which is on the Board of Examination Malaysia (Lembaga Peperiksaan Malaysia) website. You can also find it at any of these places:

  • Your school
  • Assessment and Examination Unit / Sector (Sektor / Unit Penilaian dan Peperiksaan)
  • State Department of Education (Jabatan Pendidikan Negeri)
  • Examination review counter in the Board of Examination Malaysia in Putrajaya (Kaunter Semak Semula Lembaga Peperiksaan Putrajaya)

You need to make sure that your form reaches the Board of Examination Malaysia’s office within 30 days after SPM results are announced or else it will not be processed. Your reviewed results will be posted to you 2 months after the appeal deadline. Ensure that you attach the following required documents:

  • verified copy of your official SPM 2018 results
  • verified certificate or copy of your pentaksiran berdasarkan sekolah (PBS) or school-based assessments by your school principal or Pegawai Kerajaan Kumpulan A

*Incomplete forms will not be processed.

#2. Retake your subjects

Poor spm result what to do next - 2 Retake your subjects

If you are not confident that having your papers reviewed will improve your grades, or if you want to aim for a higher grade, perhaps you can choose to resit your papers.

For a step-by-step guide on repeating your SPM subjects, click here.

Do note that for SPM Ulangan in Junethere are only 3 subjects that you can register for. These include:

  • Mathematics
  • Bahasa Melayu
  • Sejarah

If you’d like to retake papers for other subjects, you will need to register as an SPM private candidate and sit for the papers with the rest of the present year SPM students in November / December.

You will need to consider this option thoroughly as it will take another year for you to obtain better grades. By then, your peers may have already completed a year of their pre-university studies so be sure to make it count!  

Resitting papers is usually for students who are looking to enter specific pre-university or degree courses. So if you are looking to study a foundation course and you’re just shy of one credit, this is an option you can consider!

#3. Pursue diploma or certificate courses

Poor spm result what to do next - 3 Pursue diploma or certificate courses

If you’re missing a couple of credits from your SPM slip, you can also consider other pathways, such as pursuing a diploma or certificate. After all, they can still lead you to selected degree courses.

For a start, a diploma only requires 3 credits at SPM. Upon completion, you can then progress to the second year of a relevant degree. This makes your total study duration similar to taking a foundation then a degree.

Certificate courses, on the other hand, typically require only 1 credit, as long as you pass Bahasa Melayu and History. Completing a certificate will allow you to progress to a diploma and subsequently a degree.

So if you think retaking your papers will not change your grades, you may consider these alternatives, provided that you meet the entry requirements.

#4. Pursue skills/TVET certificate & diploma courses

If you have poor SPM results (don’t have enough credits) but intend to pursue an academic diploma, some University or University Colleges also accept Sijil Kemahiran Malaysia (SKM) as an entrance requirement.

No worries, if you don’t have any credit or worse still, failed in your SPM (parents force you to complete SPM despite your interest is in skills based programs), you can always pursue your interest in skills/TVET courses.

Remember, pursuing skills/TVET courses should not be your last resort but must be your interest. Studies has shown that graduates with skills are much more employable – 80 to 90 per cent of them are able to get a job after six months upon graduation (vs graduates from academic background. Those taking cert/diploma/degree in business studies, marketing, information technology, social science courses will find it hard to land a job, unlike those who take Technical and Vocational Education Training (TVET) courses.

#5. Contact us

If you are undecided on what course or where to pursue your TVET/skills courses, you can get in touch with us here or call us at +6012 3123430. We will be happy to help!

At the end of the day, it doesn’t matter if you have poor SPM results because it’s not the end of the road yet. There are still plenty of things you can do to secure your future. Many have managed to become successful, even without a string of As.

Credit: https://eduadvisor.my (Points 1-3 are from them)